2 results for Agnew, S.

  • Assigning Grades During an Earthquake - Shaken or Stirred?

    Hickson, S.; Agnew, S. (2011)

    Discussion / Working Papers
    University of Canterbury Library

    In the event of an unanticipated disruption to normal life, universities tend to shift to an online environment in both delivery and assessment. Course instructors still need to assign grades despite not having the full set of planned assessments. This paper examines how grades are disrupted when an increased reliance is placed on online assessments.  We find substantial grade disruption and grade inflation as the weighting on online assessments rises relative to invigilated assessments. Grade inflation can be moderated by scaling to an historical distribution of grades; however such scaling can lead to substantial grade disruption where the quality of the cohort is different than the historical average. We also find evidence that time limited online assessments produce lower grade disruptions as weighting on the online component increases.

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  • Using Online Assessment to Replace Invigilated Assessment in Times of a Natural Disaster - Are Some Online Assessment Conditions Better than Others?

    Agnew, S.; Hickson, S.M. (2011)

    Discussion / Working Papers
    University of Canterbury Library

    As the result of the September 4th 2010 Canterbury earthquake and associated aftershocks on February 22nd 2011 and June 13th 2011, final examinations in the two 100 level economics papers at Canterbury University were cancelled at short notice in semester one 2011. The final examination weightings were spread over the remaining assessments to obtain a final grade for students. This paper attempts to establish how different online assessment conditions affect final grade distributions when online assessments are substituted for an invigilated final examination. Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank order correlation coefficients are used to show that there is a greater correlation between online quizzes and invigilated assessments when those quizzes are only available for a restricted period of time, compared to the whole semester. We find that online quizzes are more closely correlated with invigilated assessments when the first attempt at a quiz is recorded, as opposed to the highest of two attempts. We also find that using the first attempt leads to less grade disruption when compared to a “normal” semester that includes a final examination. Finally, the actual impact on student grades when online quizzes are substituted for a final examination is discussed.

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