13 results for Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.

  • Service in practice, practice in service, negotiating a path to the future

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Hudson, M.; Baker, V.; Hepi, M.; Mika, C.; Tiakiwai, S.J. (2008)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    The sustainability of cultural knowledge and practices, and environments to support these are subject to the pressures of a globalising western society. Traditional Maori healers find themselves at the centre of such impacts and experience a unique set of tensions in working to sustain a healing tradition dependent on maintaining the integrity of both the environment and matauranga Maori (Maori knowledge). In addition to balancing their existing relationships between the environment and traditional knowledge, they must also forge new relationships and practices in the development of health services. The practice of traditional healing is founded on the notion of service to the community where practitioners respond to a ‘calling’ and commonly have a gift for the work. The practices of traditional healers evolve from serving the people and notions of koha (gift, donation) and reciprocity permeate this relationship. However within the health system concepts of practice and service are substantially different. Services are delivered to clients and rely on consistent application of skills by professionals organized around particular specialties. This alters the nature of the therapeutic relationship and the expectations of both the healer and the community. Transitioning from a ‘practice’ based approach to one of ‘service’ delivery requires careful negotiation of challenges in terms of changing relationships, expectations of quality, and maintenance of capacity. Research and evaluation have a distinct role to play in developing a pathway to the future in both the retention and development of indigenous health knowledge that informs traditional healing, and in producing the type of evidence necessary to support the development of rongoa (medicine, cure) services within mainstream health systems.

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  • Where the rubber hits the road less travelled: bridging technical and cultural understandings of marae on-site wastewater treatment and disposal

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Foote, J.; Hepi, M.; Leonard, M.; Rogers-Koroheke, M.; Taimona, H. (2008)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    Te Riu o Hokianga is a Maori community development research project involving the Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR) Ltd and Hokianga Health Enterprise Trust (HHET) working in partnership with Hokianga hapu and iwi to improve marae-based sewage treatment and disposal systems. Multi-agency hui were held with representatives from district and regional councils, independent engineers, funders and hapu. These hui surfaced the idea of a ‘roadmap’ as a tool to assist hapu navigate through the wastewater management area. The roadmap sets out a tikanga-based kaupapa Maori process associated with activities for upgrading marae on-site wastewater systems. In supporting hapu wastewater ‘literacy’, the roadmap represents an attempt to bridge the divide between hapu and local government approaches to on-site systems problems/issues. This work revealed the extent of differences between technical and cultural perspectives, including divergent understandings of wastewater discharge and its effects, where the authority to determine land use and the acceptability of discharges lies, and the role/legitimacy of marae in this regard. This paper outlines the strengths and weaknesses of the roadmap in mediating hapu and council worldviews and creating understanding between parties. Broader implications for mana whenua and local authority partnership and excellence in wastewater management are also discussed.

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  • Nga Tohu o te Ora: traditional Maori healing and wellness outcomes

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Hudson, M.; Bishara, I.; Milne, M.; Stewart, M. (2012)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Enacting kaitiakitanga: challenges and complexities in the governance and ownership of rongoa research information

    Boulton, A.; Hudson, M.; Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Stewart, A. (2014)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article explores the tensions one research team has faced in securing appropriate governance or stewardship (which we refer to as kaitiakitanga) of research data. Whilst ethical and regulatory frameworks exist which provide a minimum standard for researchers to meet when working with Maori, what our experience has highlighted is there is currently a “governance” gap in terms of who should hold stewardship of research data collected from Maori individuals or collectives. In the case of a project undertaken in the traditional healing space, the organisation best placed to fulfil this governance role receives no funding or support to take on such a responsibility; consequently by default, this role is being borne by the research team until such time as capacity can be built and adequate resourcing secured. In addition, we have realised that the tensions played out in this research project have implications for the broader issue of how we protect traditional knowledge in a modern intellectual property law context, and once again how we adequately support those, often community-based organisations, who work at the interface between Indigenous knowledge and the Western world.

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  • The future of rongoa Maori: wellbeing and sustainability.

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Baker, V.; Hepi, M.; Hudson, M.; Mika, C.; Tiakiwai, S (2008)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Rongoa Maori is a holistic system of healing that has developed out of Maori cultural traditions. It has a long history of usage and credibility among Maori, and increased interest in its revival and sustainability has prompted calls for its formalisation within the New Zealand public health system. Objective and methods The objectives of the research project were to: - Examine the contribution of rongoa Maori to indigenous wellbeing, and - Identify issues for the ongoing sustainability of traditional Maori healing in New Zealand. The research process was lead by Maori researchers in collaboration with Maori healers and stakeholders. Two literature reviews were undertaken; one to provide understanding of international developments in traditional medicine, and a second to review national policy/literature related to rongoa Maori. Four focus groups and five workshops were held with groups in five communities to explore current rongoa practice and service delivery and drivers/barriers to its ongoing utilisation. The participant groups were healers and their associates, and health and local authority stakeholders.

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  • Developing services in te rohe o Ngai Tahu for Maori with gambling related problems

    Robertson, P.; Pitama, S.; Huriwai, T.; Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Larsen, J.; Uta’i, S.; Haitana, T (2005)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Although Maori, like other indigenous populations, have been identified as being disproportionately at risk of gambling related problems, there has been limited progress with strategies to address issues in this area. The purpose of the current study was to contribute to the advancement of problem gambling services for Maori living in te rohe o Ngai Tahu by identifying the capacity and willingness of existing services to engage with such development. Following a review of the relevant literature, information was gathered through a phone survey of local Maori health providers and several non-Maori gambling services. The survey identified a number of salient issues, many not surprisingly relating to recruitment and retention of appropriately skilled staff, A need for increased training of both Maori and non-Maori gambling treatment workers was highlighted, however the presence of some current capacity and a broad willingness to contribute to development of Maori responsive interventions was clearly indicated. The results of the survey along with information from the literature provided the basis for constructing a framework to guide problem gambling service development in te rohe o Ngai Tahu, While the current study was focused on this specific region, it is likely that many of the issues identified would be pertinent to developments in other tribal areas.

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  • Mental health services for older people: a critical appraisal of the literature. New Zealand Health Technology Assessment Report Vol. 7(2)

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Rasmussen, P.; Day, P (2004)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Genetic research, population health and Maori

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Hudson, M.; Macartney-Coxson, D. (2009)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Early genetic research focused on identifying single genes responsible for specific familial disorders. However, radical technological advancements such as high throughput testing and genome-wide scanning techniques have made it possible to examine complex conditions influenced by multiple genes and environmental factors to determine population susceptibility. Genetic epidemiology studies the distribution of genetic traits and variation within families and populations, risk factors associated with the frequency of genetic traits, and the role of genetic factors in disease aetiology (Khoury, Beaty & Cohen, 19931). This enables the impact of a specific genetic variation on disease risk in an individual or in a population to be estimated (Kaprio, 20002). As the contribution of a single gene variant to disease can be relatively small, it is important to understand not only the contribution of other genetic factors but how these interact with environmental factors to modulate disease risk.

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  • A model of hapu development

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Foote, J.; Hepi, M.; Rogers-Koroheke, M.; Taimona, H.; Broodkoorn, M. (2008)

    Discussion / Working Papers
    University of Canterbury Library

    Included in the 2008 coursebook for Otago University, Christchurch postgraduate course PUBH 709 (Maori Health Issues)

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  • Community involvement in decision-making for the beneficial re-use of biosolids: biosolids case study final report. Client Report FW09086

    Baker, V.; Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Foote, J.; Hepi, M.; Winstanley, A (2009)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The future of rongoa Maori: wellbeing and sustainability. A summary

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Baker, V.; Hepi, M.; Hudson, M.; Mika, C.; Tiakiwai, S (2008)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Aound 80% of the developing world’s rural population depends on traditional medicines for its primary healthcare needs (World Health Organization (WHO) 2003). Since the late 1970s, the WHO has promoted traditional medicines internationally. Now the popularity of traditional medicines is increasing, and their use is spreading among urban populations in many industrialised countries. The growth in interest in, and utilisation of, traditional medicine and healing practices has led to varying degrees of integration with the dominant westernised approach to medicine. However, scepticism remains among indigenous peoples about whether successful integration and acceptance within modern health systems is possible. In New Zealand, traditional healing has a long history of usage and credibility among Maori. Recently, a research project was completed that looked into the current status of traditional Maori healing and its contribution to wellbeing, and the integration of rongoa Maori with mainstream healthcare to sustain the practice. A Maori research/inquiry paradigm guided the research. The project was informed by a national literature review, and focus groups and workshops with traditional healers and rongoa Maori stakeholders. This work provided direction about the research required to support the integration of rongoa Maori with mainstream healthcare. This report summarises the findings of the research project and is based on the report ‘The future of rongoa Maori: wellbeing and sustainability’, prepared for Te Kete Hauora (Ministry of Health) by the Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR) Ltd. and Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi, in partnership with Nga Ringa Whakahaere o te Iwi Maori.

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  • Health policy, health inequalities and Maori

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A. (2016)

    Chapters
    University of Canterbury Library

    Health policy has the very important role of guiding the efforts of the health sector towards population health, navigating the ‘choppy waters’ or dynamic contexts within which health is impacted and promoted. As the whakataukī (proverb/s) above caution, there are inherent dangers in being misguided, or in not coordinating efforts. In relation to Māori health, policy in Aotearoa New Zealand is marked by fluctuations between policies of assimilation and policies that support the retention and development of Māori interests (Durie, 2005, p. 4). Policy changes have been subtle but at times profound, moving gradually closer to a Māori worldview within a sectorally based public sector (Cunningham & Durie, 2005, p. 211). With reference primarily to public policy, this chapter will outline the broad dimensions of health policy in New Zealand, how health policy has, and has not, addressed the needs of Māori with particular reference to the health disparities that characterise Māori health in New Zealand.

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  • Windows, wheels and wai: public policy, environmental health action and Maori community development - implications for (eco)social work

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A.; Foote, J. (2016)

    Chapters
    University of Canterbury Library

    Many New Zealanders take access to safe drinking-water for granted, yet approximately 20 percent of Aotearoa New Zealand’s population is supplied with water that does not comply with drinking-water standards. Non-compliant drinking-water supplies place communities at increased risk of contracting waterborne pathogens such as hepatitis A, Campylobacter and Giardia (Ministry of Health, 2013). These pathogens contribute significantly to the burden of illness in rural communities. For example, monitoring undertaken by Northland Health (Project Waiora) in the late 1990s found persistent faecal coliform (Escherichia coli) transgressions in many Northland schools and marae (Auckland Regional Public Health Service, 2005). In 1998 a hepatitis A outbreak at a Hokianga marae, caused by contaminated drinking-water, required the vaccination of 800 people (New Zealand Public Health Report, 1999). Despite the urgent public health need, no action was taken. There are several possible reasons for this: a lack of drinking-water treatment expertise in the local public health unit; safe drinking-water not being accorded priority, or funding by the Ministry of Health, due to its non-regulated nature (Mistry, 2012); a lack of political will to remedy the situation; and/or funding constraints being used to justify inaction (Jellie et al., 2003). For Hokianga hapū (sub-tribes), access to safe drinking-water is a community priority. A clean and healthy environment, and the ability to fulfill kaitiaki (environmental stewardship) responsibilities, is critical to whānau, hapū and iwi (family, sub-tribe and tribe) identity and wellbeing. For the past two decades, in the face of local authority inaction, local health provider Hokianga Health Enterprise Trust (HHET)/Hauora Hokianga has supported (ultimately successful) hapū efforts to improve community drinking-water supplies. These developments have shaped public policy, environmental health practice and understanding of community development throughout the country. In this chapter the case of small water-supply management in the Hokianga region will be explored, firstly to demonstrate the ways in which policy can be utilised by communities for gains unforeseen by policy-makers, and secondly to offer insights into the social policy/social work interface.

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