6 results for Al-Ubaydli, M

  • The Doctor's PDA and Smartphone Handbook

    Al-Ubaydli, M; Paton, Christopher (2006)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Doctor's PDA and Smartphone Handbook: Medical Records

    Paton, Christopher; Al-Ubaydli, M (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ability to store patient records on a handheld computer is perhaps the feature that clinicians want the most, yet it also is perhaps the hardest to provide. If you are buying a device for yourself simply so that you can use it for medical records, then you should abandon the purchase and save your money.

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  • The Doctor's PDA and Smartphone Handbook: Medical References

    Al-Ubaydli, M; Paton, Christopher (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    A handheld computer smaller than a paperback can carry the equivalent of several bookshelves of text, and you have whole libraries from which to choose. For many doctors, the ability to carry and refer to their own favourite books on a handheld computer is the best reason for investing in a device.

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  • The Doctor's PDA and Smartphone Handbook: The Task List

    Paton, Christopher; Al-Ubaydli, M (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    A good house officer is an organized house officer; and keeping track of the jobs to be done for each patient is arguably the most important skill for doctors beginning their career. Your handheld computer’s task list will not make you organized, but it will provide you with the tools you need to be organized.

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  • The Doctor's PDA and Smartphone Handbook: Personal Digital Assistant

    Paton, Christopher; Al-Ubaydli, M (2005)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    What do drug dealers and doctors have in common? From the 1980s onwards neither could do their job without a pager. Only by carrying a pager can junior doctors leave their wards, safe in the knowledge that they would be paged about their patients’ needs. The same junior doctors also feel safer knowing that they can page their senior at any time to get advice and support. And of course the code blue message on pagers is essential to the ability of the cardiac arrest team to respond quickly wherever its individual members are dispersed in the hospital. Handheld computers promise an even bigger qualitative contribution to clinical workflow. Not only can you use a handheld computer to do your clinical work faster and better than before, you can do some things that colleagues without these devices are simply incapable of doing.

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  • The Doctor's PDA and Smartphone Handbook: Databases

    Paton, Christopher; Al-Ubaydli, M (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    A database is the computer equivalent of a filing cabinet full of forms. Like a filing cabinet, a database can store a lot of information, and by using forms, the information is structured, which paves the way for statistical analysis and audits. A database on a handheld computer has many advantages over a filing cabinet. First, you can carry all the forms you need. This is great for audits, because you can enter data about patients at any time, including while you are with the patient during the ward round or when you can get hold of the patient's notes from the consultant's secretary. Second, you can carry all the information you have filled out in the past. Not only is the handheld device orders of magnitude smaller than a filing cabinet, the sorting and searching tools are very fast. For example, if you have a list of patients, it only takes a few seconds to sort it by each patient's name and then to sort it again by consultant's name. You can quickly search for a patient whose date of birth is before a certain year and whose blood results are within a certain range. Finally, you can share the information with colleagues. Beaming makes this quick and easy to do as you meet with colleagues during the day. It takes more effort and expertise to do this with synchronization, but it means you can get the information without needing a face-to-face meeting.

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