7 results for Ali, A

  • Effect of Mouth Rinsing and Ingestion of Carbohydrate Solutions on Mood and Perceptual Responses During Exercise

    Ali, A; Moss, C; Yoo, MJY; Wilkinson, A; Breier, BH

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether mouth rinsing or ingesting carbohydrate (CHO) solutions impact on perceptual responses during exercise. Methods: Nine moderately trained male cyclists underwent a 90-min glycogen-reducing exercise, and consumed a low CHO meal, prior to completing an overnight fast. A 1-h cycle time trial was performed the following morning. Four trials, each separated by 7days, were conducted in a randomized, counterbalanced study design: 15% CHO mouth rinse (CHOR), 7.5% CHO ingestion (CHOI), placebo mouth rinse (PLAR) and placebo ingestion (PLAI). Solution volumes (1.5ml·g-1 ingestion trials and 0.33ml·kg-1 rinsing trials) were provided after every 12.5% of completed exercise. Perceptual scales were used to assess affective valence (feeling scale, FS), arousal (felt arousal scale, FAS), exertion (ratings of perceived exertion, RPE) and mood (profile of mood states, POMS) before, during and immediately after exercise. Results: There was no difference in RPE (CHOI, 14.0±9; CHOR, 14.2±.7; PLAI, 14.6±1.8; PLAR, 14.6±2.0; P=0.35), FS (CHOI, 0.0±1.7; CHOR, -0.2±1.5; PLAI, -0.8±1.4; PLAR, -0.8±1.6; P0.15), or FAS (CHOI, 3.6±1.1; CHOR, 3.5±1.0; PLAI, 3.4±1.4; PLAR, 3.3±1.3; P=725) scores between trials. While overall POMS score did not appear to differ between trials, the 'vigour' subscale indicated that CHOI may facilitate the maintenance of 'vigour' scores over time, in comparison to the steady decline witnessed in other trials (P=0.04). There was no difference in time trial performance between trials (CHOI, 65.3±4.8min; CHOR, 68.4±3.9min; PLAI, 68.7±5.3min; PLAR, 68.3±5.2min; P=0.21) but power output was higher in CHOI (231.0±33.2 W) relative to other trials (221-223.6 W; Plt0.01). Conclusions: In a CHO-reduced state, mouth rinsing with a CHO solution did not impact on perceptual responses during high-intensity exercise in trained cyclists and triathletes. On the other hand CHO ingestion improved perceived ratings of vigour and increased power output during exercise.

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  • Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing Has No Effect on Power Output During Cycling in a Glycogen-reduced State

    Ali, A; Yoo, M; Moss, C; Breier, B

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: The effect of mouth rinsing with a carbohydrate (CHO) solution on exercise performance is inconclusive with no benefits observed in the fed state. This study examined the effect of CHO mouth rinse or CHO ingestion on performance in 9 moderately trained male cyclists. Methods: Four trials were undertaken, separated by 7 days, in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Each trial included a 90-min glycogen-reducing exercise protocol, immediately followed by a low CHO meal and subsequent overnight fast; the following morning a 1-h cycling time trial was conducted. The trials included 15 % CHO mouth rinse (CHOR), 7.5 % CHO ingestion (CHOI), placebo mouth rinse and placebo ingestion. Solutions were provided after every 12.5 % of completed exercise: 1.5 mL · kg−1 and 0.33 mL · kg−1 body mass during ingestion and rinse trials, respectively. During rinse trials participants swirled the solution for 8 s before expectorating. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals before and during exercise. Results: Performance time was not different between trials (P = 0.21) but the 4.5-5.2 % difference between CHOI and other trials showed moderate practical significance (Cohen’s d 0.57-0.65). Power output was higher in CHOI relative to other trials (P < 0.01). There were no differences between CHOR and placebo groups for any performance variables. Plasma glucose, insulin and lactate concentrations were higher in CHOI relative to other groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In a fasted and glycogen-reduced state ingestion of a CHO solution during high-intensity exercise enhanced performance through stimulation of insulin-mediated glucose uptake. The CHO mouth rinsing had neither ergogenic effects nor changes in endocrine or metabolic responses relative to placebo.

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  • Caffeine Enhances Cognitive Function and Skill Performance during Simulated Soccer Activity

    Foskett, A; Ali, A; Gant, Nicholas (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is little evidence regarding the benefits of caffeine ingestion on cognitive function and skillful actions during sporting performance, especially in sports that are multifaceted in their physiological, skill, and cognitive demands. Purpose: To examine the influence of caffeine on performance during simulated soccer activity. Methods: Twelve male soccer players completed two 90-min soccer-specific intermittent running trials interspersed with tests of soccer skill (LSPT). The trials were separated by 7 days and adhered to a randomized crossover design. On each occasion participants ingested 6 mg/kg body mass (BM) of caffeine (CAF) or a placebo (PLA) in a double-blind fashion 60 min before exercise. Movement time, penalties accrued, and total time were recorded for the LSPT. Physiological and performance markers were measured throughout the protocol. Water (3 ml/kg BM) was ingested every 15 min. Results: Participants accrued significantly less penalty time in the CAF trial (9.7 ± 6.6 s vs. PLA 11.6 ± 7.4 s; p = .02), leading to a significantly lower total time in this trial (CAF 51.6 ± 7.7 s vs. PLA 53.9 ± 8.5 s; p = .02). This decrease in penalty time was probably attributable to an increased passing accuracy in the CAF trial (p = .06). Jump height was 2.7% (± 1.1%) higher in the CAF trial (57.1 ± 5.1 cm vs. PLA 55.6 ± 5.1 cm; p = .01). Conclusions: Caffeine ingestion before simulated soccer activity improved players’ passing accuracy and jump performance without any detrimental effects on other performance parameters.

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  • Fluid balance, thermoregulation and sprint and passing skill performance in female soccer players

    Ali, A; Gardner, R; Foskett, A; Gant, Nicholas (2011-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Ten females performed 90 min of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) on two occasions separated by 7 days. Water [3 mL/kg body mass (BM)] was provided every 15 min during exercise (FL); no fluid was given in the other trial (NF). Participants performed the Loughborough Soccer Passing Test (LSPT) before and every 15 min during the LIST. Core temperature (Tc) was measured throughout using ingestible temperature sensors. Heart rate (HR), blood lactate ([La−]) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were collected at regular intervals during exercise. Participants experienced greater BM loss in NF (2.2 ± 0.4%) than FL (1.0 ± 0.4%; P<0.01) and RPE (P=0.009) were higher during exercise in NF. Ingesting water during a 90-min match simulation reduces the mild dehydration seen in female soccer players when no fluid is consumed. However, there was no effect of fluid ingestion on soccer passing skill or sprint performance.

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  • The influence of caffeine and carbohydrate co-ingestion on performance

    Gant, Nicholas; Ali, A; Foskett, A (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Carbohydrate and caffeine are known to independently improve certain aspects of athletic performance. However,less is understood about physiological and performance outcomes when these compounds are coingested in a rehydration and carbohydrate-replacement strategy. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of adding a moderate dose of caffeine to a carbohydrate solution during prolonged soccer activity. Fifteen male soccer players performed two 90-min intermittent shuttle-running trials. They ingested a carbohydrate electrolyte solution (CON) providing a total of 1.8 g/kg body mass (BM) of carbohydrate or a similar solution with added caffeine (CAF; 3.7 mg/kg BM). Solutions were ingested 1 hr before exercise and every 15 min during the protocol. Soccer passing skill and countermovement-jump height (CMJ) were quantified before exercise and regularly during exercise. Sprinting performance, heart rate, blood lactate concentration (La) and the subjective experiences of participants were measured routinely. Mean 15-m sprint time was faster during CAF (p = .04); over the final 15 min of exercise mean sprint times were CAF 2.48 ± 0.15 s vs. CON 2.59 ±0.2 s. Explosive leg power (CMJ) was improved during CAF (52.9 ± 5.8 vs. CON 51.7 ± 5.7 cm, p = .03). Heart rate was elevated throughout CAF, and ratings of pleasure were significantly enhanced. There were nosignificant differences in passing skill, rating of perceived exertion, La, or body-mass losses between trials.The addition of caffeine to the carbohydrate-electrolyte solution improved sprinting performance, countermovement jumping, and the subjective experiences of players. Caffeine appeared to offset the fatigue-induced decline in self-selected components of performance.

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  • Validation of a soccer skill test for use with females.

    Ali, A; Foskett, A; Gant, Nicholas (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The aim of this study was to validate the Loughborough Soccer Passing Test (LSPT) for use with female players. Nineteen Premier Division (elite) and 16 Reserve team players (nonelite) volunteered for this study. The LSPT requires players to complete 16 passes against coloured target areas as fast and as accurately as possible. Participants completed an initial familiarisation trial followed by two main trials, each separated by at least one week. During both trials participants were given two practice efforts before recording the mean of the next two attempts as the performance score. All trials were performed inside a sports hall, using an indoor soccer ball, and following a standardised 10-min warm-up. The mean time taken (54.6 ± 5.3 s vs. 61.6 ± 6.5 s, p = 0.002), added penalty time (22.8 ± 7.2 s vs. 35.9 ± 11.5 s, p < 0.001) were lower for elite players. Due to the lower agreement ratio, LSPT performance was more repeatable in the elite (×/÷1.39) relative to nonelite (×/÷1.45) group. In conclusion, the LSPT is a valid and reliable protocol to assess differences in soccer skill performance using female players.

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  • Impact on Patient Outcomes: Evaluation of Waitemata DHB's Medicine Use Review Service.

    Bye, Lynne; Ali, A; Clark, T; Davis, K; Hong, Y; Crump, K; Harrison, J (2010-12-08)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Medicine Use Review (MUR) is a medication counselling and adherence support service involving an initial consultation with an accredited pharmacist and two follow-ups over one year which is funded by the Waitemata District Health Board (WDHB) in NZ. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of the WDHB MUR service on the outcomes of care for enrolled patients. METHOD: The study population was 493 patients enrolled into the WDHB MUR service from October 2007 to August 2010. Service documentation, EuroQol questionnaire (1), pharmacist interview and hospital admission data were evaluated. Medicine related problems (MRPs) identified, interventions recommended and reported outcomes were collated and coded using a modification of the PCNE (Drug Related Problem classification) (2). The interview data was analysed using a general inductive theme analysis. RESULTS: From a sample of 477 patients, 1595 MRPS were identified with the majority being fully resolved. Quality of life (QOL) scores increased from the initial consultation to follow-up two. Hospital admissions and length of stay decreased between the year before MUR and two years following. Themes from the interview included; increased adherence, improved ability to self-manage medicines and decreased General Practice visits. DISCUSSION: The WDHB MUR service has been shown to resolve MRPs, improve QOL and reduce hospitalisations. 1. Brooks R. EuroQol: The current state of play. Health policy. 1996;37. 2. Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe Foundation. The PCNE Classification V 5.01. 2006.

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