4 results for Ali, R

  • Results from the Australian arm of an international RCT of a Brief Intervention for Illicit drug use linked to the scores on the Alcohol, SMoking abn Substance Involvement ScreeningTest (ASSIST)

    Dennington, V; Humeniuk, RE; Newcombe, David; Ali, R; Vial, R (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report presents the findings from the Australian component of the international World Health Organisation ASSIST (Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test) Phase III Screening and Brief Intervention study. Abbreviated

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  • Pharmacy students: Personality Types, Professionalism and Decision Making

    Jensen, Maree; Ram, Sanyogita; Dhana, A; Ali, R; Goh, S; Sherif, B; Kwon, S; Elsedfy, Y; Russell, Bruce (2014-06-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Facebook© use has become increasingly popular for pharmacy students. Recent debate about the ethical and professional principles pharmacy students possess when social networking online prompted this study. We aimed to identify links between personality types within the University of Auckland (UoA) pharmacy cohort, their activity on Facebook©, and their professional decision making skills.

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  • Mood disturbance and withdrawal severity in substitution treatment for opioid dependence: Their association and impact on continued illicit drug use

    Kettler, L; Nikic, M; Newcombe, David; Ali, R (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objectives: This study explored the relationship between withdrawal severity and mood disturbance, and their links with continued illicit drug use during the first 3 months of opioid substitution treatment (ST). Methods: Sixteen participants undergoing opioid ST with methadone (n=7) or buprenorphine (n=9) were recruited through outpatient units in South Australia. In a within-groups repeated measures design, the Opiate Treatment Index was administered at baseline and again at 3 months. Participants also completed the Methadone Symptoms Checklist and the Profile of Mood States at baseline and fortnightly throughout the 3-month measurement period. Results: Withdrawal severity and mood disturbance were observed to co-vary over the 3 months. Statistically significant reductions in both withdrawal severity and mood disturbance were observed. The direction of association between withdrawal severity and mood disturbance was positive and was statistically significant at all measurement points. Continued use of illicit drugs was associated with higher levels of both mood disturbance and withdrawal severity. Conclusions: Withdrawal severity and mood disturbance co-vary over time and have important implications for treatment outcomes in ST.

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  • Key findings from the WHO collaborative study on substitution therapy for opioid dependence and HIV/AIDS

    Lawrinson, P; Ali, R; Buavirat, A; Chiamwonpaet, S; Dvoryak, S; Habrat, B; Jie, S; Mardiati, R; Mokri, A; Moskalewicz, J; Newcombe, David; Pozynak, V; Subata, E; Uchtenhagen, A; Utami, D; Vial, R; Zhao, C (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aims Opioid substitution treatment has been studied extensively in industrialized countries, but there are relatively few studies in developing/transitional countries. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of opioid substitution treatment (OST) in less resourced countries. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Purposively selected OST sites in Asia (China, Indonesia, Thailand), Eastern Europe (Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine), the Middle East (Iran) and Australia. Participants Seven hundred and twenty-six OST entrants. Measurements Participants were interviewed at treatment entry, 3 and 6 months. Standardized instruments assessed drug use, treatment history, physical and psychological health, quality of life, criminal involvement, blood-borne virus (BBV) risk behaviours and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C. Findings Participants were predominantly male, aged in their early 30s and had attained similar levels of education. Seroprevalence rates for HIV were highest in Thailand (52%), followed by Indonesia (28%) and Iran (26%), and lowest in Australia (2.6%). Treatment retention at 6 months was uniformly high, averaging approximately 70%. All countries demonstrated significant and marked reductions in reported heroin and other illicit opioid use; HIV (and other BBV) exposure risk behaviours associated with injection drug users (IDU) and criminal activity, and demonstrated substantial improvement in their physical and mental health and general wellbeing over the course of the study. Conclusions OST can achieve similar outcomes consistently in a culturally diverse range of settings in low- and middle-income countries to those reported widely in high-income countries. It is associated with a substantial reduction in HIV exposure risk associated with IDU across nearly all the countries. Results support the expansion of opioid substitution treatment.

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