4 results for Allan, S.

  • Collaborate and connect, optimise your digital presence in a dynamic environment

    Dawson, R. G.; Tritt, S. L.; Ash, M.; Allan, S.

    Conference Contribution - Unpublished
    Lincoln University

    Professional and social media provide an assortment of overlapping and competing opportunities for developing your online identity in a collective and dynamic setting. Optimise the value of your achievements by presenting your research profile, associated scholarship and research outputs, collected in a mutual and reciprocal environment. Enable collaborations and establish your place among colleagues by using digital tools that authenticate and promote your research impact, to amplify and enhance your discoverability. Your digital interactions create an indelible online record, so clarity of identity is essential to be able to collaborate sustainably and successfully, benefit cumulatively and credibly, and avoid dilution of your profile. Using several tools is encouraged to develop and maintain a singular professional profile in harmony with the ongoing evolution of the media.

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  • Focus your ideas and identity: Enhance your research profile and progress your career

    Dawson, R. G.; Tritt, S. L.; Ash, M.; Allan, S.

    Conference Contribution - Unpublished
    Lincoln University

    Engaging with the services offered by Library, Teaching and Learning will enhance your readiness for transforming opportunities into actions. Anticipate the barriers, mitigate the risks, and avoid the pitfalls ahead. Refine your profile with an ORCID and build your fluency with scholarly communication, raise your awareness and increase your responsiveness to the issues related to copyright, publishing and open access. Realise the long term potential of your digital outputs by depositing them in either the Research Archive or the Community Archive on an open access basis using a Creative Commons licence. Ensure you create and maintain a professional profile that has currency, authenticity and relevance, and maps to the dynamic global environment. Familiarise yourself with ResearchGate, Academia, LinkedIn, and other web services that have the potential to impact on your reputation and influence your peer esteem. Be reflective and continue to shape your identity as you develop your professional presence. Benefit from acknowledged employment services using CareerHub, and network with other graduates through AlumniLinc. Maximise your choices throughout your career by maintaining durable links with peers, colleagues and alumni.

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  • Truth in a War Zone: The Role of Warblogs in Iraq

    Matheson, D.; Allan, S. (2007)

    Chapters
    University of Canterbury Library

    This chapter proposes to examine the emergent forms and practices of blogging as an augmentation of – and at times challenge to – war reporting. As will soon become apparent, however, we have not attempted the difficult task of comprehensively surveying the multiplicity of warblogs concerned with the invasion and its aftermath. Rather, we have chosen to investigate a small number, grouping them into three broad categories: warblogs associated with major news organizations; warblogs produced by freelance or ‘sojo’ reporters, as well as ‘personal’ or ‘amateur’ journalists; and warblogs posted by Iraqi citizens. In the course of our analysis, we draw upon insights provided by bloggers themselves, both from interviews conducted by ourselves as well as from other sources. We suggest that these writers valued the use of blogging as journalism – characterized as it is by informality, subjectivity and eyewitness experience – for the ways in which it cuts across the fundamentals of ostensibly impartial news reporting. In this chapter’s evaluation of warblogging’s relative strengths and limitations, then, care will be taken to discern the extent to which it represents a challenge to certain longstanding tenets of war reporting.

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  • Online Journalism in the Information Age

    Allan, S.; Matheson, D. (2004)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    The use of information by the powerful and privileged as a means to reinforce, even exacerbate, the structures of the ‘digital divide’ is well documented. In our view, however, insufficient attention has been devoted to examining the evolving forms, practices and epistemologies of online journalism in this context, especially with regard to its potential for shaping democratic deliberation and debate across what are ever more globalised public spheres. At stake for this article’s discussion, then, is the need to help establish the basis for a critical mode of enquiry into the ways in which journalism’s status in an online environment is being transformed by the informational dynamics of the network society.

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