2 results for Allen, W

  • Achieving more effective social marketing: Putting the social back into systems theory

    Conroy, Denise; Allen, W (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Abstract: Social systems have long been explored, researched and investigated in an effort to discern, amongst other things, how behaviour can be changed to encourage more sustainable practices. However, it is our contention that prior research has concentrated too heavily on the ‘systems’ part of this equation, thereby marginalising its social aspects. Our own research suggests that excellent work already exists which both teases out and models social behaviour; and yet these behaviour models are rarely applied to our understanding of sustainable behaviour change. We suggest that by considering such systems as primarily social, better outcomes are more likely to be achieved. In viewing systems as social, we differentiate between simple, complex, and complicated systems and we use this model to illustrate why interventions that are successful in one situation, are not necessarily successful in another. We conclude by offering insights with respect to what social science can offer change programmes in the area of sustainability and how social marketing can contribute to this effort.

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  • A sub-Saturn mass planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb

    Miyake, N; Sumi, T; Dong, S; Street, R; Mancini, L; Gould, A; Bennett, DP; Tsapras, Y; Yee, JC; Albrow, MD; Bond, IA; Fouqué, P; Browne, P; Han, C; Snodgrass, C; Finet, F; Furusawa, K; Harpsøe, K; Allen, W; Hundertmark, M; Freeman, M; Suzuk, D; Abe, F; Botzler, CS; Douchin, D; Fukui, A; Hayashi, F; Hearnshaw, JB; Hosaka, S; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, PM; Korpela, A; Lin, W; Ling, CH; Makita, S; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagayama, T; Nishimoto, K; Ohnishi, K; Perrott, YC; Rattenbury, Nicholas; Saito, To; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, DJ; Sweatman, WL; Tristram, PJ; Wada, K; Yock, Philip; Bolt, G; Bos, M; Christie, GW; Depoy, DL; Drummond, J; Gal-Yam, A; Gaudi, BS; Gorbikov, E; Higgins, D; Hwang, K-H; Janczak, J; Kaspi, S; Lee, C-U; Koo, J-R; Kozllowski, S; Lee, Y; Mallia, F; Maury, A; Maoz, D; McCormick, J; Monard, LAG; Moorhouse, D; Muñoz, JA; Natusch, T; Ofek, EO; Pogge, RW; Polishook, D; Santallo, R; Shporer, A; Spector, O; Thornley, G; Allan, A; Bramich, DM; Horne, K; Kains, N; Steele, I; Bozza, V; Burgdorf, MJ; Calchi Novati, S; Dominik, M; Dreizler, S; Glitrup, M; Hessman, FV; Hinse, TC; Jørgensen, UG; Liebig, C; Maier, G; Mathiasen, M; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Wambsganss, J; Zimmer, F; Batista, V; Beaulieu, JP; Brillant, S; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Corrales, E; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Menzies, J (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    We report the gravitational microlensing discovery of a sub-Saturn mass planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb, orbiting a K- or M-dwarf star in the inner Galactic disk or Galactic bulge. The high-cadence observations of the MOA-II survey discovered thismicrolensing event and enabled its identification as a high-magnification event approximately 24 hr prior to peak magnification. As a result, the planetary signal at the peak of this light curve was observed by 20 different telescopes, which is the largest number of telescopes to contribute to a planetary discovery to date. The microlensing model for this event indicates a planet–star mass ratio of q = (3.95 ± 0.02) × 10−4 and a separation of d = 0.97537 ± 0.00007 in units of the Einstein radius. A Bayesian analysis based on the measured Einstein radius crossing time, tE, and angular Einstein radius, θE, along with a standard Galactic model indicates a host star mass of ML = 0.38+0.34 −0.18M and a planet mass of Mp = 50+44 −24 M⊕, which is half the mass of Saturn. This analysis also yields a planet–star three-dimensional separation of a = 2.4+1.2 −0.6 AU and a distance to the planetary system of DL = 6.1+1.1 −1.2 kpc. This separation is ∼2 times the distance of the snow line, a separation similar to most of the other planets discovered by microlensing.

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