6 results for Allen, W.

  • Conservation and sustainable use of New Zealand flora: on non-conservation land

    Cullen, R.; Hughey, K. F. D.; Booth, K.; Crawford, K.; Allen, W.; Kilvington, M. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

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  • Hey! What's your footprint?

    Baldwin, C.; Becken, S.; Allen, W.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Ecological footprint calculators are an effective communication and educational tool to measure the impact of humanity on our planet (Barrett et al., 2004). This project’s aim was to design and then trial a footprint tool for children using a format that was engaging, purposeful and childspecific. A further objective was to test whether, through specific information and dialogue, pupils could then modify their own behaviour to reduce their footprint through action strategies in a collaborative environment. The method used involved scoping a group of three children to develop specific parameters and then trialling the footprint tool’s design and programme in four Canterbury schools. The results suggest that footprint tools can be effective in changing behaviour. The developmental process was critical to encourage planning, actions and reflection in a supportive setting (Allen et al., 2002; Bosch et al., 2007; Whitehead & McNiff, 2006). We further posit that the process used to motivate environmental behaviour change could be used effectively in other educational programmes in either schools or the wider community. It was not just the footprint tool used in isolation that effected behaviour change in over 70 percent of pupils; rather the tool was seen as a catalyst within this environmental education programme (Law, 2004; Ministry of Education, 2007). It was the process used to engage pupils – enhance their values for a sustainable future in a supportive landscape – that facilitated effective teaching and also learning processes in young people. This project uses the process of Action Research to trial a purpose-designed footprint tool on children to help them reduce their impact on the environment. The institutions involved in this project were: The Royal Society of New Zealand, Lincoln University, and Landcare Research. The Canterbury schools participating were: Lincoln High School, Christchurch South Intermediate School, Addington School, and Beckenham School.

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  • From 'dialogue' to 'engagement'? Learning beyond cases

    Winstanley, A.; Tipene-Matua, B.; Kilvington, M.; Allen, W.; Du Plessis, R. (2005)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Cross Case Study Learning Group

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  • Involving the public in science and technology decision-making: A review of national and international initiatives

    Allen, W.; Du Plessis, R.; Kilvington, M.; Tipene-Matua, B.; Winstanley, A. (2003)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Working Paper produced by the Cross Case Study Learning Group

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  • Reanalyses of anomalous gravitational microlensing events in the OGLE-III early warning system database with combined data

    Jeong, J.; Park, H.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M.K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D.P.; Bond, I.A.; Botzler, C.S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D.J.; Sweatman, W.L.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P.J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P.C.M.; Yonehara, A.; Albrow, M.D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J-P.; Caldwell, J.A.R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hoffman, M.; Huber, M.; Jørgensen, U.G.; Kane, S.R.; Kubas, D.; Martin, R.; Marquette, J.B.; Menzies, J.; Pitrou, C.; Pollard, K.; Sahu, K.C.; Vinter, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Allen, W.; Bolt, G.; Choi, J.Y.; Christie, G.W.; DePoy, D.L.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B.S.; Hwang, K-H.; Jung, Y.K.; Lee, C-U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L.A.G.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ofek, E.O.; Park, B-G.; Pogge, R.W.; Santallo, R.; Shin, I.G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J.C.; Bramich, D.M.; Burgdorf, M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y. (2015)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) lensing survey conducted during the 2004–2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of eight events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of five events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG- 491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for six events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006- BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein radii of three events for which multi-band data are available. These events are OGLE-2006- BLG-238, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. For OGLE-2008-BLG-143, we detect higher-order effects induced by the changes of the observer’s position caused by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we present degenerate solutions resulting from the known close/wide or ecliptic degeneracy. Finally, we note that the masses of the binary companions of the lenses of OGLE-2006-BLG-450 and OGLE-2008-BLG- 210 are in the brown-dwarf regime.

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  • Understanding adaptation and transformation through indigenous practice: The case of the Guna of Panama

    Apgar, M. J.; Allen, W.; Moore, Kevin; Ataria, James M.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    © 2015 by the author(s).Resilience is emerging as a promising vehicle for improving management of social-ecological systems that can potentially lead to more sustainable arrangements between environmental and social spheres. Central to an understanding of how to support resilience is the need to understand social change and its links with adaptation and transformation. Our aim is to contribute to insights about and understanding of underlying social dynamics at play in social-ecological systems. We argue that longstanding indigenous practices provide opportunities for investigating processes of adaptation and transformation. We use in-depth analysis of adaptation and transformation through engagement in participatory action research, focusing on the role of cultural and social practices among the Guna indigenous peoples in Panama. Our findings reveal that cultural practices facilitating leadership development, personhood development, and social networking are critical for enabling both adaptation and transformation. Further, we argue that Guna ritual practice builds additional skills, such as critical self-reflection and creative innovation, that are important for supporting the deeper changes required by transformation.

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