5 results for Amis, J

  • Translating institutional logics: A sensemaking perspective on policy implementation.

    Vardaman, J; Amis, J; Gondo, M; Wright, P; Dyson, Benedict; Ferry, H (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This article investigates how organizational actors implement change in situations where multiple competing logics are present. We identified competing logics (academic achievement and holistic development) in public education that were grounded in differing perspectives on the proper role of public schools. Our study centers around an examination of how organizational actors at four public schools in Mississippi cope with organizational challenges brought about by legislation intended to reduce childhood obesity. The examination took place at three levels of analysis, societal, organizational, and individual, and our findings suggest that the sensemaking of local actors in the face of competing logics impacted policy enactment. By taking a situated sensemaking perspective, we direct attention away from the passive construction of institutions, and instead toward the actions of individuals as they accomplish the established, organized procedures that are necessary for the reproduction of institutions over time.

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  • Using Qualitative Research to Inform the Policy Making Process.

    Dyson, Benedict; Wright, P; Amis, J; Vardaman, J; Ferry, H (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although qualitative research offers unique contributions to the policy process, its influence is often limited. This presentation will address a central question of this conference, “How can qualitative research inform the policy-making process?” In response to the current obesity epidemic, federal and state policies have been passed related to the quality and quantity of physical education provision within schools. While such initiatives appear logical, evidence indicates these policies have frequently proved ineffective. We are conducting a two-year funded project that builds in-depth case studies and develops a detailed, multilevel understanding of how policy is developed, enacted and implemented at state, district and school levels. Through an engaged discussion, we will highlight issues related to research design, access, representation and standards of quality. We will also address strategies to maximize the influence qualitative research might have on the policy-making process.

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  • Are Physical Educators Responsible for Teaching Responsibility?

    Dyson, BP; Wright, P; Ferry, H; Vardaman, J; Amis, J (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This session will examine the place of personal and social responsibility in physical education. The presenters will share findings from a longitudinal study of high school physical education in the Southern US. Recommendations for teacher preparation, policy formation, and future research on this topic will be discussed with the audience.

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  • Physical Education Policy, Teacher Development, and Student Empowerment

    Dyson, Benedict; Wright, P; Amis, J; Ferry, H; Vardaman, J (2009-04-14)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of this study was to examine the development of new PE policy initiatives and their subsequent implementation in four Mississippi and four Tennessee high schools. A comparative case study approach (Yin, 2003) was adopted in which policy developments and implementation were analyzed and compared across eight high schools. Data collection involved 30 observations of PE classes and 72 interviews with lobbyists, legislators, state and district officials, principals, PE teachers, classroom teachers, guidance counselors, and students. Six themes emerged: Problematic policy enactment, Inadequate facilities, Overcrowding, Narrow PE curriculum, Standardized testing, and Bureaucracy. This work is well positioned to offer insight into attempts to bring about major change through new PE, and other, policy initiatives.

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  • The Production, Communication, and Contestation of Physical Education Policy: The Cases of Mississippi and Tennessee.

    Dyson, Benedict; Wright, P; Amis, J; Ferry, H; Vardaman, J (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of this study was to explore the production, communication, interpretation and contestation of new physical education (PE) and physical activity (PA) policy initiatives introduced in Mississippi and Tennessee for the academic year 2006?2007. These states provide a relevant context to study such issues, since Mississippi has the highest and Tennessee has the fifth-highest rate of childhood obesity in the United States (Trust for America’s Health, 2009). The social-ecological model was used as a theoretical framework to interpret the social, economic, temporal, and political interactions that shaped the development, interpretation, and implementation of these policies (Stokols, 1992). A multiple-level case study design (Yin, 2003) was adopted in which the policy process was analyzed and compared across eight high schools. Four high schools were purposefully selected in each state that provided a broad range of contextual differences and collected data in real-time during a one-year period. We conducted 73 interviews with key stakeholders, including policymakers, school administrators, teachers and students, and observed PE lessons and school-based activities. The researchers identified themes from the data: Policy process; Expectation of compliance; Unfunded mandate; Problematic policy enactment; Academic pressure; Marginalized status of PE; Narrow PE curriculum; and Dislike of PE. Even though new PE and PA legislation had been passed in both states, no substantive change occurred in any of the schools during our study. This work moves beyond a superficial understanding of how policy initiatives impact PA and PE provisions within schools, particularly at the secondary level. We recommend the development of support systems within the school through the creation of clear goals, strategic plans, and professional development to implement new policy initiatives.

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