2 results for Amuketi, Tamati

  • Claiming collective space: Kaupapa Maori in psychology

    Levy, Michelle Patricia; Amuketi, Tamati; Lane, Catherine (2008)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    From its inception, the Psychology Department at the University of Waikato has had a focus on issues of culture, particularly those of relevance for Maori, with these early foundations laid by Emeritus Professor James Ritchie, who in 1965 took up the founding chair of the Department. These foundations have continued to be built on, utilising a variety of different strategies. Drawing on a research base which has emerged primarily from within the Maori and Psychology Research Unit at Waikato University, this paper explores strategies which have served to carve out and claim space for Maori, both within the department, and within the wider discipline of psychology.

    View record details
  • Te Rau Puawai 2002-2004: An evaluation

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Rua, Mohi; Duirs, Andrew; Thompson, Keri; Amuketi, Tamati (2005-01-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Established in 1999 as a joint workforce initiative between the former Health Funding Authority and Massey University, Te Rau Puawai aimed to support 100 Maori students to graduate with mental health qualifications within a five year period. The goal of Te Rau Puawai is to contribute to the building of capacity for Maori in the mental health workforce. The programme exceeded its performance expectations in the first two years (1999-2001) with 56 bursars completing their qualifications. Bursars achieved an 80% pass rate compared with 65% for all students at Massey University as a whole. In 2004, this pass rate has continued, a significant achievement in light of increasing numbers of bursars being accepted and many without previously studying at the tertiary level. In 2001 the Maori & Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) at the University of Waikato undertook an evaluation of Te Rau Puawai reporting on the programme's success and identifying any barriers the programme needed to address. The 2002 evaluation report outlines critical success factors and recommendations for improvement. In 2003 Te Rau Puawai negotiated further funding from the Mental Health Directorate (MeHD) of the Ministry of Health under the Mental Health Workforce Development Strategy (2002). Workforce development is critical in building capacity and capability in the mental health workforce to increase appropriately skilled workers required to meet the mental health needs of Maori communities. In 2004 the Ministry of Health requested a follow-up evaluation to provide a descriptive record of programme activities and progress from April 2002 to December 2004. This report provides an overview of Te Rau Puawai activities between 2002 and 2004; the progress and contributions made by bursars to the mental health workforce; and a reassessment of the programme's critical success factors.

    View record details