8 results for Anae, Melani

  • Pacific peoples and tertiary education: issues of participation

    Benseman, John; Anae, Melani; Anderson, Helen; Coxon, Eve (2002)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The purpose of this research study was, therefore, to gather qualitative information on the actual and perceived barriers to participation in tertiary education and training for Pacific peoples. The study had a particular mission to develop an understanding of the experiences and perceptions of Pacific communities, in order to inform future policies aimed at addressing barriers to Pacific people’s participation in tertiary education and training. Specific areas for the project to investigate included: • current participation patterns and steps taken in different tertiary education institutions to identify and remove barriers; • the views of Pacific peoples who have participated successfully in tertiary education, those who have participated but not completed their studies, and those who have not participated in tertiary education; and • the views of a range of Pacific community members, including the families of potential students as to why some have succeeded and the barriers to students’ participation. The following assumptions were made in designing the research: • that ‘tertiary education’ includes universities, polytechnics, colleges of education and private training establishments (PTEs); • that Pacific peoples can enter tertiary education both as school-leavers and as mature-age adults, and that the research needs to address these groups as taking different routes with different accompanying issues; • that the term ‘Pacific peoples’ contains considerable cultural and historical diversity which will need to be addressed in appropriate ways by the researchers; and • that there are already in existence successful programmes and strategies in this area and that it is important to document and analyse these success stories as part of this project

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  • The Polynesian Panthers 1971-1974: The Crucible Years

    Anae, Melani (2006)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • TEU LE VA - Relationships across research and policy in Pasifika education A collective approach to knowledge generation & policy development for action towards Pasifika education success

    Airini; Anae, Melani; Mila-Schaaf, K (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    By drawing on community knowledge, research, and focus group data Teu le Va is about bringing researchers and policy makers together within a shared agenda and common processes to help improve education outcomes for and with Pasifika learners.

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  • Teu Le Va — Relationships across research and policy in Pasifika education: A collective approach to knowledge generation & policy development for action towards Pasifika education success

    Airini; Anae, Melani; Mila-Schaaf, K (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    In November 2007, a partnership between the Pasifika Caucus of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) and the Ministry of Education’s Pasifika and Research and Evaluation teams formed to sponsor the symposium Is Your Research Making a Difference to Pasifika Education? The symposium sought to grow the pool of researchers able and motivated to undertake quality research on improving Pasifika student outcomes; to identify good practice that has enhanced Pasifika education research/policy linkages; and to share ideas for and about Pasifika education research methodologies, in order to improve the quality and quantity of evidence informing Pasifika education policy. A wide group of people who have a stake in Pasifika education research came to the symposium to think about, debate and advise on the formation of guidelines to translate Pasifika education research into policy. The group included associates from the Ministry of Education and other government agencies, universities, the Private Training Establishment (PTE) sector, independent researchers, and community members.

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  • Fofoa-i-vao-'ese : the identity journeys of NZ-born Samoans

    Anae, Melani (1998)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This thesis constitutes a site for New Zealand-born Samoans to explore issues of ethnic identity. The emphasis is on the process of the Samoanising of christianity, and hegemonic identity discourses of not only the dominant society but of island-born Samoans and elders, and how this contributes to New Zealand-born Samoan self perceptions. A socio-historical overview provides an understanding of the process in which New Zealand born Samoans have been positioned. The stories and narratives of a group of New Zealandborn Samoans concerning their life experiences provide valuable insights into their 'identity journeys'--the construction of ethnic identity through experimenting with subject positions over time, as a result of challenges to their percieved self-identities. For some, this journey ends with a secured identity--a self-satisfying ethnic identity as a New Zealand-born Samoan--others remain in a perpetual state of conscious or subconscious identity confusion. More specifically the thesis seeks to provide an understanding and an interpretation of the way fa'aSamoa, church, and life in New Zealand impacts on life choices and on the construction of the self, and secured identities. The identity journey is analysed as a ritual and a series of rites of passage in order to expose the structure of identity confusion, and to examine the dichotomy of chaos and conflict within an apparently ordered society, experienced by New Zealand-born Samoans during their identity journeys.The thesis is therefore underpinned by Samoan conceptual frameworks involved in this identity journey, and aims to consciousness-raise and emancipate by exposing, understanding and reclaiming the links between fa'aSamoa, church, and a New Zealand born Samoan identity.The thesis represents an 'ie toga, because like a fine mat being woven, the strands of Samoan history, fa'aSamoa and Samoan contemporary lifeways, and their interaction with 'others' interconnect to inform Samoan identity. It is thus presented with respect, gratitude, deference, recognition and obligation, a tangible symbol of an alliance and an exchange with all Samoans and others. As the wellspring of my Samoan identity, in its creativity in design and fineness of weave, I hope that this 'ie toga will be received as a source of identity, history and wealth.

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  • Research for better Pacific Schooling in New Zealand: Teu le va - a Samoan perspective

    Anae, Melani (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The tendency of much research on Pacific communities in New Zealand to gloss multi-ethnic and intra-ethnic complexities limits the possibility of real change for these marginalised communities. In place of the existing proliferation and fragmentation of Pacific research methodologies, frameworks and models, I offer the Samoan cultural reference of ‘teu le va’, a Pacific indigenous methodology for directive action in negotiating research relationships, as a philosophical and methodological turning point in education research praxis. ‘Teu le va’ is aligned with a cultural ecology research approach in its focus on the significance of context in understanding the domains of social relationships for all stakeholders in Pacific education research. Various relational contexts in which ‘teu le va’ should be valued and acted on are identified. By reconciling connections within and between these contexts, the possibility of a transformative education agenda for Pacific communities will be advanced.

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  • Retaining non-traditional students: lessons learnt from Pasifika students in New Zealand

    Benseman, J; Coxon, Evelyn; Anderson, H; Anae, Melani (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    As New Zealand tertiary education has undergone extensive review processes, debate has centred not only on the need to extend the participation rates of groups previously under‐represented, but also how to retain these under‐represented groups once they are recruited into tertiary programmes. This paper draws on a large‐scale study of the factors that influence successful completion of tertiary qualifications for Pasifika students. Using a diverse range of data sources throughout New Zealand, the study identified a range of factors that impede retention, as well as positive factors that help increase retention. Its findings support the contention that the capacity of educational facilities to retain students is a function of the interface between student and institution, and the institution and the community.

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  • Teu le va: toward a 'native' antrhopology

    Anae, Melani (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Samoan word va tapuia, includes the tenn «tapu," within. The term literally refers to the sacred (tapu-ia) relationship (va) between man and all things, animate and inanimate. It implies that in our relationships with all things, living and dead, there exists a sacred essence, a life force beyond human reckoning. The distinction here between what is living and what is dead is premised not so much on whether a «life force," i.e. a nwuli or fatu nwnava exists in the thing (i.e. whether a "life-breath" of "heart beat" exudes from it), but whether that thing, living or dead, has a genealogy (in an evolutionary rather than human procreation sense) that connects to a life force. The va tapuia, the sacred relations, between all things, extends in the Samoan indigenous reference to all things living or dead, where a genealogical relationship can be traced. (His Excellency Tui Atua Tupua Tamosese Efi 2007, 3)

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