7 results for Anderson, Anneka

  • Migration and settlement in Indian, Korean and Chinese immigrant communities in Auckland: a perspective from the political ecology of health

    Anderson, Anneka (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Mark of Shame: Social stigma, tuberculosis and Asian immigrants to New Zealand

    Anderson, Anneka (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In many human societies secrecy and stigmatisation are associated with tuberculosis (TB). Disease-related stigmas have significant impacts upon the human experience of illness. Stigma can increase stress associated with illness, contribute to secondary psychological and social morbidity and affect quality of life and physical well-being (Fife and Wright 2000). ...

    View record details
  • Approaching Migrant Health in New Zealand through the Lens of Political Ecology: A Case of TB

    Anderson, Anneka (2009)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Northland District Health Board Research Report: Whānau experiences of the diagnosis and management of Acute Rheumatic Fever for tamariki in Te Tai Tokerau, Aotearoa

    Anderson, Anneka; Mills, C; Eggleton, Kyle; Henare-Toka, T; Palmer, J; Bay, B; Bickerton, Elizabeth (2015)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rates of Acute Rheumatic Fever (ARF), a preventable disease which can develop into Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD), are decreasing in most developed countries. In Aotearoa/New Zealand however, ARF remains a significant health problem with persistent ethnic, social and demographic inequities. Māori children between 5-15 years of age in Te Tai Tokerau (Northland) have some of the highest ARF rates nationally. Our study explored whānau experiences of ARF, including pathways to and through ARF diagnosis and treatment and aimed to support more appropriate and relevant interventions for Māori living in Te Tai Tokerau. The study applied a qualitative Kaupapa Māori research design that included participant observations, whānau interviews, and individual, semi-structured interviews with 10 whānau groups (36 participants) who resided in Te Tai Tokerau at the time of the research. ARF impacted on financial status, employment and education of whānau and resulted in whānau experiencing significant emotional, social and economic stressors. The principal pathways to reducing these stressors included the presence of whānau support, and good rapport, communication and continuity of care with healthcare professionals. Recent ARF health promotion campaigns, media coverage and discussions from health care professionals sometimes created cultural deficit explanations of ARF that were internalised by participants, eliciting additional anxiety and conflict for whānau. Within the primary care setting, inadequate throat swabbing and/or antibiotic prescribing in conjunction with experiences of health service-related discrimination and racism were barriers to improving ARF outcomes for whānau. Based on our findings we suggest that health services need to employ an integrated support service for ARF prevention and care that promotes youth and whānau centered approaches. We recommend the implementation and regular evaluation of cultural safety training and greater emphasis on whakawhanaugatanga/rapport building between health practitioners, clients and their whānau across the health sector. To avoid further stereotyping and to improve ARF interventions, we suggest that health promotion campaigns target the underlying structural causes of ARF rather than focusing solely on ethnicity and behaviour. Finally, we recommend that a quality of improvement process is implemented for the management and utilisation of sore throat guidelines within Northland’s primary health care services.

    View record details
  • Migration and settlement in Indian, Korean and Chinese immigrant communities in Auckland: a perspective from the political ecology of health

    Anderson, Anneka (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research used tuberculosis (TB) as a lens to elucidate how migration, settlement, local agency and support networks influence migrants’ health in New Zealand. The study also examined specific characteristics of TB such as delays in diagnosis and the stigma attached to the disease to gain a broader understanding of TB experience for migrants in New Zealand. The research addressed these aims through the analytical framework of political ecology and incorporation of interviews, participant observation and media analysis. Participants in the research included immigrants from Mainland China, South Korea, and India, and New Zealand health care professionals. The study found that immigration policies, social discrimination and isolation have created structural inequalities between dominant host populations and Asian migrants in New Zealand. These inequalities compounded settlement problems such as language difficulties and limited employment opportunities, resulting in low income levels and perceived stress for Indian, Korean and Chinese people, which has affected their health and well being. Transnational policies and experiences of health care systems in immigrants’ countries of origin and in New Zealand strongly influenced health seeking behaviour of migrants, along with structural barriers such as lack of Asian health care professionals and interpreting services. Local cultural and biological factors including health cultures and physical symptoms also affected these practices. In relation to TB, structural processes along with clinic doctor-patient relationships and social stigmas created barriers to diagnosis and treatment. Factors that facilitated access to health care in general, and TB diagnosis and treatment in particular, included the use of support networks, particularly local General Practitioners from countries of origin, and Public Health Nurses, along with flexible TB treatment programmes. This study shows that the incidence and experience of TB is shaped by migration and settlement processes. It also builds upon other medical anthropological studies that have employed political ecology by demonstrating its usefulness in application to developed as well as developing countries. In addition, the study contributes to the growing area of Asian migration research in New Zealand, illustrating that migration and settlement processes are complex and need to be understood as multidimensional, thus demonstrating advantages in approaching them from a political ecological framework.

    View record details
  • Understanding migrants' primary healthcare utilisation in New Zealand through an ethnographic approach

    Anderson, Anneka (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Health inequalities between migrants and host populations in many western countries, including New Zealand, have been associated with low healthcare utilisation. This research used an ethnographic approach based on participant observation and semistructured interviews to examine Asian migrants' use of primary health services in New Zealand. Participant observations were undertaken in migrant organisations, and clinical and domestic settings. In addition, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 migrants from India, South Korea and Mainland China, and six with New Zealand healthcare professionals. Migrants used a variety of strategies to negotiate New Zealand's healthcare system. These were influenced by their knowledge of it, their experience with healthcare systems in their home countries, language difficulties, structural barriers, divergent understandings of health and the extent of their local support networks. Social networks were found to play fundamental roles in migrants' healthcare strategies and, if promoted through community development, could increase the utilisation of primary health services and reduce health inequalities in New Zealand and other host countries.

    View record details
  • Migrants and tuberculosis: analysing epidemiological data with ethnography

    Littleton, Judith; Park, Juliet; Thornley, C; Anderson, Anneka; Lawrence, JF (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objective: Media portrayals of tuberculosis (TB) in New Zealand are of immigrants who enter the country with active disease and pose a threat to inhabitants, which fosters a popular perception that border control is the best and only response to disease control. This paper reviews both New Zealand and international data on TB rates, causes and transmission among migrant populations to elucidate the precise nature of the link between immigration and TB rates. Methods: Recent information from scholarly journals on immigration and TB was reviewed. Surveillance data from New Zealand and comparable information from other low-incidence countries were reviewed. Conclusions and Implications: The importation of active TB is only a minor part of the total TB burden. While effective border control is essential, equally, if not more important, are the circumstances that promote the reactivation of latent TB infection in migrant communities, including migrants’ experiences in transit and after arrival, structural conditions, and personal characteristics. For sound prevention strategies, attention needs to be paid to the existence of transnational communities and the conditions for migrants, rather than placing a singular focus on place of birth.

    View record details