6 results for Anderson, H

  • Firm size and the political cycle premium

    Malone, CB; Anderson, H; Chen, P (2015)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    We investigate the role of firm size in generating political cycle outcomes. Like in the U.S., New Zealand’s political cycle premium is driven by small firms; however, the results are opposite. In New Zealand, periods governed by the right of the political spectrum produce significantly higher stock returns than those from the left and this finding is primarily driven by small firms who perform particularly poorly under left-of-centre governments. We identify several explanations for the poor performance in small firms. These firms were relatively heavily affected by the move to an open, deregulated economy; they were also less able to cope with tight monetary conditions, and periods of sharply falling inflation.

    View record details
  • China and International Housing Price Growth

    Chang, Y; Anderson, H; Shi, S (2017-04-04)

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    We document the Chinese effects on international residential property price growth. We show housing prices grow faster following decline in growth of China’s gross domestic product, increases in China’s savings rate, or rise in China’s risks. These results are consistent with the notion of Chinese investing in overseas property markets when faced with less promising investment opportunities at home and when they have the means to invest offshore. These effects are stronger for countries where English is the primary spoken language, with better tertiary education quality, and that exhibit lower correlations between local property market price growth and China’s interest rate.

    View record details
  • Retaining non-traditional students: lessons learnt from Pasifika students in New Zealand

    Benseman, J; Coxon, Evelyn; Anderson, H; Anae, Melani (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    As New Zealand tertiary education has undergone extensive review processes, debate has centred not only on the need to extend the participation rates of groups previously under‐represented, but also how to retain these under‐represented groups once they are recruited into tertiary programmes. This paper draws on a large‐scale study of the factors that influence successful completion of tertiary qualifications for Pasifika students. Using a diverse range of data sources throughout New Zealand, the study identified a range of factors that impede retention, as well as positive factors that help increase retention. Its findings support the contention that the capacity of educational facilities to retain students is a function of the interface between student and institution, and the institution and the community.

    View record details
  • Voices from Manukau: recruitment and success of traditionally under represented undergraduate groups in New Zealand

    Millward, P; Stephenson, MS; Rio, N; Anderson, H (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper describes a research project, ‘‘Voices from Manukau’’, that investigated the impact of a joint initiative by a university and an institute of technology in New Zealand. The purpose of the initiative was to increase the participation of students traditionally under represented at tertiary-level study, particularly Ma¯ori (indigenous people) and individuals from Pacific Island nations. Many of the participants were adults who had not experienced high levels of success during their compulsory period of education and they lived in low socio-economic areas. We found that participation of under-represented groups increased. The ‘‘Manukau’’ students were as successful as other undergraduate students studying at the university. Of particular interest was the high level of success of Ma¯ori and Pacific Island students.

    View record details
  • Cultural Globalization and Teacher Education: A Local Perspective

    Stephenson, Maxine; Rio, Nane; Anderson, H; Millward, Pamela (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This article examines the nature of cultural globalization and its effects as experienced and confronted in a teacher education program that is located in New Zealand's most ethnically diverse and fastest growing city. The students in the program bring a wide range of cultural, social, and experiential perspectives to their tertiary study, and are a crucial future teaching resource for the community within which their educational institution is situated. Through interviews, the students examine the importance of their educational environment, and acknowledge the wealth of resource they have found within their pre-service group in preparing them for teaching careers in which cultural identity and intercultural awareness will be central. Their interpretations of their interactions and activities enable the exploration of how this occurs, as cultural dynamics are played out on a daily basis often at a conscious level in a multicultural context where relations among indigenous, colonizer, and migrant populations interconnect.

    View record details
  • [2010] New Zealand Law Review, Part I

    Anderson, H; Bigwood, R; Buckingham, J; November, J; Rendell, J; Wilberg, H; Beck, A (2010)

    Scholarly Text
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details