4 results for Anderson, HR

  • Global map of the prevalence of symptoms of rhinoconjunctivitis in children: The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase Three

    Aït-Khaled, N; Pearce, N; Anderson, HR; Ellwood, Philippa; Montefort, S; and the ISAAC Phase Three Study Group; Shah, J; Clayton, Tadd; Mitchell, Edwin; Stewart, AW; Asher, Monica Innes (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Phase One of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) measured the global patterns of prevalence and severity of symptoms of rhinoconjunctivitis in children in 1993–1997. Methods: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase Three was a cross-sectional survey performed 5–10 years after Phase One using the same methodology. Phase Three covered all of the major regions of the world and involved 1 059 053 children of 2 age groups from 236 centres in 98 countries. Results: The average overall prevalence of current rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms was 14.6% for the 13- to 14-year old children (range 1.0–45%). Variation in the prevalence of severe rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms was observed between centres (range 0.0–5.1%) and regions (range 0.4% in western Europe to 2.3% in Africa), with the highest prevalence being observed mainly in the centres from middle and low income countries, particularly in Africa and Latin America. Co-morbidity with asthma and eczema varied from 1.6% in the Indian sub-continent to 4.7% in North America. For 6- to 7-year old children, the average prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms was 8.5%, and large variations in symptom prevalence were also observed between regions, countries and centres. Conclusions: Wide global variations exist in the prevalence of current rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms, being higher in high vs low income countries, but the prevalence of severe symptoms was greater in less affluent countries. Co-morbidity with asthma is high particularly in Africa, North America and Oceania. This global map of symptom prevalence is of clinical importance for health professionals.

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  • Is eczema really on the increase worldwide?

    Williams, H; Stewart, Alistair; von Mutius, E; Cookson, WO; Anderson, HR; and the ISAAC Phase One and Three Study Groups; Clayton, Tadd; Mitchell, Edwin; Asher, Monica Innes; Ellwood, Philippa (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: It is unclear whether eczema prevalence is truly increasing worldwide. Objective: We sought to investigate worldwide secular trends in childhood eczema. Methods: Children (n 5 302,159) aged 13 to 14 years in 105 centers from 55 countries and children aged 6 to 7 years (n5187,943) in 64 centers from 35 countries were surveyed from the same study centers taking part in Phase One and Three of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood by using identical validated and translated questionnaires. Eczema was defined as an itchy, relapsing, flexural skin rash in the last 12 months, and it was termed severe eczema when it was associated with 1 or more disturbed nights per week. Results: Annual prevalence changes in relation to average prevalence across Phase One and Three were generally small and differed in direction according to the age of the participants and world region. For children 13 to 14 years old, eczema symptom prevalence decreased in some previously highprevalence centers from the developed world, such as the United Kingdom and New Zealand, whereas centers with previously high prevalence rates from developing countries continued to increase. In the children 6 to 7 years old, most centers showed an increase in current eczema symptoms. Similar patterns to these were present for severe eczema at both ages. Conclusion: The epidemic of eczema seems to be leveling or decreasing in some countries with previously high prevalence rates. The picture elsewhere is mixed, with many formerly low-prevalence developing countries experiencing substantial increases, especially in the younger age group.

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  • Self-Reported Truck Traffic on the Street of Residence and Symptoms of Asthma and Allergic Disease: A Global Relationship in ISAAC Phase 3

    Brunekreef, B; Stewart, Alistair; Anderson, HR; Lai, CKW; Strachan, DP; and the ISAAC Phase Three Study Group; Pearce, N; Mitchell, Edwin; Clayton, Tadd; Asher, Monica Innes; Ellwood, Philippa (2009-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND: Associations between traffic pollution on the street of residence and a range of respiratory and allergic outcomes in children have been reported in developed countries, but little is known about such associations in developing countries.METHODS: The third phase of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) was carried out in 13- to 14-year-old and 6- to 7-year-old children across the world. A question about frequency of truck traffic on the street of residence was included in an additional questionnaire. We investigated the association between self-reported truck traffic on the street of residence and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema with logistic regression. Adjustments were made for sex, region of the world, language, gross national income, and 10 other subject-specific covariates.RESULTS: Frequency of truck traffic on the street of residence was positively associated with the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema with an exposure-response relationship. Odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for "current wheeze" and "almost the whole day" versus "never" truck traffic were 1.35 (1.23-1.49) for 13- to 14-year-olds and 1.35 (1.22-1.48) for 6- to 7-year-olds.CONCLUSIONS: Higher exposure to self-reported truck traffic on the street of residence is associated with increased reports of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema in many locations in the world. These findings require further investigation in view of increasing exposure of the world's children to traffic.

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  • Global analysis of breast feeding and risk of symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in 6-7 year old children: ISAAC Phase Three

    Björkstén, B; Aït-Khaled, N; Asher, Monica Innes; Clayton, TO; Robertson, C; Anderson, HR; Beasley, R; Brunekreef, B; Crane, J; Flohr, C; Foliaki, S; Forastiere, F; García-Marcos, L; Keil, U; Lai, CKW; Mallol, J; Mitchell, EA; Odhiambo, J; Montefort, S; Pearce, N; Stewart, AW; Strachan, D; von Mutius, E; Weiland, SK; Williams, H; Wong, G; Howitt, ME; Weyler, J; de Freitas Souza, L; Rennie, D; Aguilar, P; Aristizábal, G; Cepeda, AM; Riikjärv, MA; sigmond, GZ; Awasthi, S; Bhave, S; Hanumante, NM; Jain, KC; Joshi, MK; Mantri, SN; Pherwani, AV; Rego, S; Salvi, S; Sharma, SK; Singh, V; Sukumaran, U; Suresh Babu, PS; Kartasasmita, CB; Masjedi, MR; Odajima, H; Imanalieva, C; Kudzyte, J; Quah, BS; Teh, KH; Baeza-Bacab, M; Barragán-Meijueiro, M; Del-Río-Navarro, BE; García-Almaráz, R; González-Díaz, SN; Linares-Zapién, FJ; Merida-Palacio, JV; Romero-Tapia, S; Romieu, I; MacKay, R; Moyes, C; Pattemore, P; Onadeko, BO; Cukier, G; Brêborowicz, A; Lis, G; Câmara, R; Lopes dos Santos, JM; Nunes, C; Rosado Pinto, JE; Lee, HB; Busquets, RM; Carvajal-Urueña, I; García-Hernández, G; González Díaz, C; López-Silvarrey Varela, A; Morales-Suárez-Varela, MM; Al-Rawas, O; Mohammad, S; Huang, JL; Kao, CC; Trakultivakorn, M; Vichyanond, P; Lapides, MC; Sears, M; Shah, J; Baratawidjaja, K; Lee, BW; Ellwood, Philippa (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background In Phase Three of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), we investigated the relationship between breast feeding in infancy and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in 6–7 year old children. Methods Parents or guardians of 6–7 year old children completed written questionnaires on current symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema, and on a range of possible asthma risk factors including a history of breast feeding ever. Prevalence odds ratios were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for gender, region of the world, language, per capita gross national income, and other risk factors.

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