13 results for Anderson, Marc Howard

  • An examination of the relationship between absorptive capacity and organizational learning, and a proposed integration

    Sun, Peter Yih-Tong; Anderson, Marc Howard (2010)


    University of Waikato

    Since its inception, the concept of absorptive capacity has been closely linked with notions of organizational learning. Yet the precise nature of the relationship between these two concepts has never been established. This relationship is examined in a variety of ways, and it is suggested that the literature on these two concepts shares a conceptual affinity which needs to be delineated. It is suggested that absorptive capacity (a dynamic capability) is a concrete example of organizational learning that concerns an organization's relationship with new external knowledge. Using the 4I Model for organizational learning (Crossan, M.M., Lane, H.W. and White, R.E. (1999). An organizational learning framework: from intuition to institution. Academy of Management Review, 24, 522–537) and Zahra and George's conceptualization of absorptive capacity (Zahra, S.A. and George, G. (2002). Absorptive capacity: a review, reconceptualization, and extension. Academy of Management Review, 27, 185–203), this paper proposes an integration of the two concepts.

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  • What have scholars retrieved from Walsh and Ungson (1991)? A citation context study

    Anderson, Marc Howard; Sun, Peter Yih-Tong (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Organizational memory is fundamentally important to organizational learning. The seminal work on organizational memory is Walsh and Ungson’s article published in the Academy of Management Review in 1991. More than 300 articles have cited this classic work, but a simple citation count reveals nothing about the nature of what has been retrieved. We examine this issue through a citation context analysis (i.e. content analysis) of the citations that citing authors have made to this classic article. Our analysis provides a richer understanding of which knowledge claims made by Walsh and Ungson have been retrieved and have had the greatest impact on later work in the area of organizational memory, and also what criticisms have been leveled against their claims. Through this analysis and a review of the citing articles that contain the largest number of citations to Walsh and Ungson, we identify several important directions for future research.

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  • Information gathering and changes in threat and opportunity perceptions

    Anderson, Marc Howard; Nichols, Mary (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Managers need to make sense of emerging strategic issues that could significantly impact their businesses. While models of this sensemaking process suggest that information gathering affects interpretations (which affect action and performance), researchers have argued that our understanding of the role of information in changing interpretations is underdeveloped. This paper investigates the role of the time managers spend searching for information and the diversity of the information they find in changing managers' perceptions that an equivocal, strategic issue represents a threat and opportunity for their businesses. The methodology involves a longitudinal research design in which managers recorded multiple, process-oriented measures of their information gathering activity. Results suggest that time spent searching for information leads to changes towards seeing the issue as more of a threat, while the diversity of information found leads to changes towards seeing it as less of a threat. We found no effect of information gathering on opportunity perceptions.

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  • Personality trait inferences about organizations and organizational attraction: An organizational-level analysis based on a multi-cultural sample

    Anderson, Marc Howard; Haar, Jarrod M.; Gibb, Jenny L. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Research has shown that people make inferences about the personality traits organizations possess, and that these inferences affect their perceptions of organizational attraction. The nature of the relationship between personality trait inferences and organizational attraction is unclear, however, as the results of prior studies have been somewhat inconsistent, have had several distinct limitations, and have only been conducted using US samples. We present new evidence regarding the nature of this relationship, with data on a much larger number of firms, using a multi-cultural sample. Our exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses find a seven-factor structure of personality trait inferences that includes the five factors identified by previous researchers, suggesting that while the five factors have some generalizability outside the US, there may also be important differences. Our results also provide additional support that personality trait inferences are related to perceptions of organizational attraction.

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  • Discovering your personality: A group exercise in personal sensemaking

    Anderson, Marc Howard (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Personality affects a wide variety of issues in organizational behavior, human resource management, and strategic management. Instructors teaching personality often have students take personality tests and then give them their scores. This passive approach to giving test feedback suffers from several weaknesses dealing with distinct perceptual biases. The author presents an experiential group exercise that helps overcome these problems and that has a broad range of applications in management and social science courses that discuss personality.

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  • Civic capacity: Building on transformational leadership to explain successful integrative public leadership

    Sun, Peter Yih-Tong; Anderson, Marc Howard (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    An emerging stream of work has been investigating the leadership processes necessary to guide public multi-sector collaborations. This stream of work argues that new leadership theory about integrative public leadership is needed because the context is different from that traditionally investigated by leadership researchers. In this paper, we advance the study of integrative public leadership by arguing that transformational leadership theory does apply to multi-sector collaborations, but needs to be augmented with an additional construct called “civic capacity.” We elaborate on this construct and suggest that it consists of three components: civic drive, civic connections, and civic pragmatism.

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  • How can we know what we think until we see what we said? A citation and citation context analysis of Karl Wieck's , 'The Social Psychology of Organizing'

    Anderson, Marc Howard (2006)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A substantial portion of Karl Weick’s influence on organization studies is based upon his classic book The Social Psychology of Organizing (abbreviated as Organizing). A citation analysis shows the magnitude of this influence compared to five other organization studies classics, and reveals that Organizing continues to be highly cited. A citation context analysis (i.e. content analysis) of all citations to Weick (1979) in three top organization studies journals (Academy of Management Review, Administrative Science Quarterly, and Organization Studies) shows that 12 concepts account for 67.6% of citations to Organizing, but that the book is cited for a remarkable diversity of additional content as well. Furthermore, a consideration of differences between the concepts cited in the US journals versus Organization Studies reveals several regional differences. Finally, very few citations are critical of Organizing or involve empirical tests. These results hold a variety of implications for future research.

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  • A general dynamic capability: Does it propagate business and social competencies in the retail food industry?

    Marcus, Alfred A.; Anderson, Marc Howard (2006)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Given that firms have both business and social goals, an important unanswered question is whether a general dynamic capability breeds competencies in both these areas. In studies of the US retail food industry, we find that while a general dynamic capability affects firms' competence in supply chain management (a business competency), it does not affect their competence in environmental management (a social competency). Firm mission and the extent to which firms obtain technical assistance are found to affect the acquisition of this latter competency. These findings offer insights into the resource-based view (RBV) of the firm and provide lessons for corporate social responsibility. They reveal more precisely what a general dynamic capability yields and how far its reach extends, suggesting that the factors that drive competitive advantage are not the same as those that drive social responsibility.

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  • The Importance of Attributional Complexity for Transformational Leadership Studies

    Sun, Peter Yih-Tong; Anderson, Marc Howard (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Attributional complexity refers to the capability of discriminating and integrating dimensions related to social judgment in order to understand social behaviour. While previous leadership research has examined the role of leader attributions, it has neglected the role of attributional complexity. We theorize and find support for a relationship between higher attributional complexity and transformational leadership behaviours, based on a sample of 100 leaders and their direct reports. Leaders who were more complex in their social judgments, attributing complex external and internal causes to others' behaviours and actions, were seen as more transformational by their direct reports. Our findings suggest that attributional complexity is a construct that warrants consideration in future research on both transformational leadership and leadership attributions.

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  • Social networks and the cognitive motivation to realise network opportunities: a study of managers' information gathering behaviors

    Anderson, Marc Howard (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Information gathering is central to a variety of organizational behavior theories, but researchers have suggested that our understanding of the actual information gathering behaviors of managers is underdeveloped. Social network characteristics are theorized to be a key determinant of information gathering behaviors, but social network research has been criticized for: (1) not measuring the intervening mechanisms by which network characteristics are theorized to have their effects and (2) not considering how actors' motivation affects what network benefits are realized. This article addresses these concerns through an empirical study of the actual information gathering behaviors of managers. It posits that individual differences in a personality variable called need for cognition capture differences in actors' cognitive motivation to realize the potential information benefits that exist in their social networks. Results show that network characteristics do affect information benefits, but these effects are stronger for managers motivated to take advantage of them. These findings both support social capital theory and suggest the important role that personality can play in augmenting social network analyses. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • The combined influence of top and middle management leadership styles on absorptive capacity

    Sun, Peter Yih-Tong; Anderson, Marc Howard (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Absorptive capacity is an important organizational capability constituted by exploratory, transformative, and exploitative learning processes. Leadership has been shown to affect such processes, but little is known about how the combined leadership styles of top and middle management influence absorptive capacity. This theory-building, exploratory qualitative case study discusses the need for top and middle management to be ambidextrous and to change their styles to better facilitate the three different learning processes. We found that an exploratory learning process was facilitated when both top and middle management used a transformational style, a transformative learning process was facilitated when top management used a transformational style while middle management used a transactional style, and an exploitative learning process was facilitated when both top and middle management used a transactional style. Furthermore, for each of the three learning processes, the leadership styles of top and middle management operated more effectively when certain attributes of the organizational context were emphasized.

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  • Longitudinal mediation effects of strain on the relationships between role stressors and employees' withdrawal responses

    Idris, Mohd Kamel; O’Driscoll, Michael P.; Anderson, Marc Howard (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Previous studies have found that role stressors are related to employee withdrawal responses, although the relationships have been rather indirect. The present study examined the mediation effect of strain on the relationships between role stressors and three withdrawal responses (i.e. cynicism, reduced professional efficacy and diminished organizational commitment) among a sample of Malaysian public university academics. We collected data from 357 academics and additional data 6 months later from 210 of these academics. Results showed that role stressors were associated with withdrawal behaviours via strain. Strain mediated the relationships between role ambiguity and all three withdrawal responses and the relationship between role conflict and cynicism. These results suggest that academic managers should focus on resolving role ambiguity to enhance academics' well-being, commitment and professional efficacy.

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  • Job demands and work-related psychological responses among Malaysian technical workers: The moderating effects of self-efficacy

    Panatik, Siti A.; O’Driscoll, Michael P.; Anderson, Marc Howard (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Job design has long been found to affect the work-related psychological responses of employees, such as psychological strain, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions, but scholars have begun to question whether established theoretical relations regarding job design continue to hold given the enormous changes in the nature of work during the past two decades. It is also increasingly recognized that individual differences affect work behaviours in substantial ways, but few studies on work design have investigated these differences. We addressed these concerns with a two-wave longitudinal study among 245 technical workers at a telecommunications company in Malaysia, a country that has a collectivist culture and a high power distance between managers and subordinates. We examined the moderating effects of job control and self-efficacy on the relationships between job demands and employee responses. The results failed to support the job demands-control model, as job control variables did not moderate the impact of demands on employee work-related psychological responses. However, self-efficacy moderated their impact on psychological strain (although not on job satisfaction or turnover intentions). Our findings provide insight into the moderating effect of self-efficacy, and suggest that practitioners interested in reducing psychological strain should consider making efforts to increase self-efficacy among employees.

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