8 results for Anderson, N

  • Organizational socialization: A new theoretical model and recommendations for future research and HRM practices in organizations

    Cooper Thomas, Helena; Anderson, N (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is threefold: to provide an overview of organizational socialization (OS) research; to present a new model of OS focusing on successful outcomes; and finally to draw from both of these to suggest practical steps for both organizations aiming to socialize newcomers, and for newcomers themselves. Design/methodology/approach – A summary literature review of the OS literature post-entry, focusing on organizational, insider and newcomer actions. Findings – The literature is used to develop and propose a new model of OS success, with five OS success indicators. Testable relationships are proposed between these indicators and both five learning domains and five learning sources. Research limitations/implications – The research model has not been tested empirically. Further, the fifth success indicator, external representation, is a new and untested concept in the OS literature. Practical implications – The paper provides a model that managers and newcomers may find useful to successfully negotiate the OS process. Further, the third section of the manuscript extensively discusses practical implications from the model and more broadly from the initial literature review. Originality/value – The model proposed is novel and raises the important issue of appropriate OS success indicators. New propositions are made regarding relationships between learning sources and domains with these success indicators. This testable model is a valuable resource for researchers. Further, for managers, whether newcomers themselves or responsible for newcomers, the model provides a framework for considering what they are aiming to achieve and how they might get there.

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  • Investigating organizational socialization: A fresh look at newcomer adjustment strategies

    Cooper Thomas, Helena; Anderson, N; Cash, ML (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose – The majority of organizational newcomers have prior work experience. Organizational socialization tactics are less effective for such "experienced newcomers", relative to graduate newcomers. Hence experienced newcomers tend to rely on their own actions to become socialized. The aim of this article is to assess and potentially extend the range of adjustment strategies identified as being used by experienced newcomers themselves to achieve positive adjustment. Design/ methodology/ approach – Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 86 experienced newcomers entering a professional services organization. Findings – Nineteen strategies emerged, with seven newly identified in this research. These are compared with strategies found in past research. Practical implications – HR, and the managers and colleagues of newcomers can use the strategies identified and categorized here to encourage newcomers to use organizationally-appropriate behaviors. Newcomers can use these strategies to help themselves achieve their own adjustment goals. Originality/ value – There is an increasing focus on newcomer proactive behavior in organizational socialization research, yet there are few empirically grounded developments of newcomer adjustment strategies. To our knowledge, this is the first paper to focus on what experienced newcomers report doing to help themselves adjust.

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  • An investigation into the validity of two measures of work engagement

    Viljevac, A; Cooper Thomas, Helena; Anderson, N (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study investigated the validity of two measures of work engagement (the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) and the May, Gilson and Harter scale) that have emerged in the academic literature. Data were collected using surveys with 139 employees in the Auckland-based call centers of two finance organizations, to assess the validity of the two measures. Some evidence for convergent, discriminant and predictive validity was found for both scales, although neither showed discriminant validity with regard to job satisfaction. Overall, the three factors of the UWES (vigor, dedication and absorption) performed slightly better across analyses than the three factors from the May, Gilson and Harter (2004) measure (cognitive, emotional and physical). There are some important differences between the two scales, raising questions about how we should be measuring work engagement. The current use of different descriptions and measures means that findings will be specific to each of these. This limits generalizability across studies, which will both slow theoretical progress and reduce the ability of science to contribute to practice.

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  • Organizational Socialization: A Field Study into Socialization Success and Rate

    Cooper Thomas, Helena; Anderson, N (2005)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The last decade has witnessed a resurgence of organizational socialization research. However, a critical question has been neglected: Is there a common underlying pattern to organizational socialization? We investigated newcomer learning, job satisfaction and intent to quit as common indicators of socialization, in research with 222 newcomers at two organizations during the crucial post-entry period. The results support a learning-dependent model of newcomer adjustment, with learning in specific domains related to improved attitudinal outcomes. Some aspects of organizational socialization were not uniform across the two organizations, suggesting a need for further development of socialization models and greater accounting for this in organizational socialization research.

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  • Newcomer adjustment: The relationship between organizational socialization tactics, information acquisition, and attitudes

    Cooper Thomas, Helena; Anderson, N (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    A longitudinal study was designed to investigate relationships between socialization tactics, information acquisition, and attitudinal outcomes associated with successful organizational socialization, The research was conducted over three measurements with British Army recruits during their first 8 weeks of training. The key finding is the confirmation that information acquisition mediates the relationship between organizational socialization tactics and key socialization outcomes in terms of newcomer attitudes. These results strengthen the conception of organizational socialization as primarily a learning process. In addition, these results importantly show the rapidity with which newcomers can adjust during organizational socialization.

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  • Changes in person-organization fit: The impact of socialization tactics on perceived and actual P-O fit

    Cooper Thomas, Helena; Van Vianen, A; Anderson, N (2004)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study examines the impact of socially oriented socialization tactics on changes in newcomer perceived and actual value-based person – organization (P – O) fit, and on the relations between these two measures of fit. Newcomers' fit was measured at entry (T1) and again after 4 months (T2) using the organizational culture profile (OCP; Chatman, 1991). The results show that socialization tactics influence perceived fit, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment, but not actual fit. As hypothesized, perceived and actual fit become more congruent over time, suggesting a shift in newcomers' perceptions of the organization. Additional analyses were conducted to investigate the mediating influence of perceived fit on the relationship of investiture with job satisfaction and with organizational commitment and, for both outcomes, this was found to be significant. We discuss the implications for organization socialization procedures, research into newcomer entry using measures of actual and perceived fit, and HRM practices during the initial few months of organizational entry.

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  • Changes in newcomers' psychological contracts during organizational socialization: a study of recruits entering the British Army

    Cooper Thomas, Helena; Anderson, N (1998)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    A study into changes in the psychological contracts held by newcomer recruits into the British Army is reported. Following a review of the disparate literatures on organizational socialization and the psychological contract, the need for integrative research which examines changes in perceived expectations during the organizational entry process is asserted. Four specific hypotheses are derived from this review. A sample of 880 recruits completed questionnaire measures on day one and 314 subsequently eight weeks into training. Responses were compared against a sample of 1157 experienced ‘insider’ soldiers. It was found that newcomers' expectations of the Army increased significantly on several dimensions; that these changes were predicted by learning about Army life; that perceived importance of dimensions of Army life increased; and most importantly, that these changes were generally toward the insider norms of experienced soldiers. The implications of the developing nature of the psychological contract are discussed.

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  • The Power of Momentum: A New Model of Dynamic Relationships between Job Satisfaction Change and Turnover Intentions

    Chen, G; Ployhart, RE; Cooper Thomas, Helena; Anderson, N; Bliese, PD (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study offers a new theoretical perspective on the unique nature and function of job satisfaction change, or systematic improvement or decline in job satisfaction over time. Using four diverse samples, we show that differences in the extent to which job satisfaction systematically improves or declines account for change in employees' “turnover intentions” left unexplained by absolute (average) levels of job satisfaction. Further, we show that future-oriented work expectations partially mediate this relationship, and organizational tenure moderates the relationship between job satisfaction change and future-oriented work expectations. These findings provide new insights into the dynamic processes leading to turnover decisions.

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