4 results for Archard, Sara

  • Pedagogical tools in an online teacher education programme: A sense of belonging and social presence

    Archard, Sara (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This thesis presents the findings from a study that explores in what ways the pedagogical tools in an online teacher education programme can facilitate a sense of belonging and social presence. In particular it explores the individual contribution of pedagogical online tools in relation to this. The research data was gathered using a mixed methodology. Qualitative data was gathered from questionnaires sent to six participants of the online teacher education programme that were then analysed to identify common themes, patterns and difference in participants perspectives. Quantitative data was collected by analysing the contributions of each of the six participants in specific computer mediated communication forums using Garrison and Anderson’s (2004) social presence and indicators framework across two papers of this online programme. There are two key findings evident in the data of this study. The first is that pedagogical online tools can facilitate a sense of belonging and afford social presence in an online community of learners. However, each tool has different affordances. The effectiveness of their use depends on the way they are supported and used by the lecturer. Secondly, each participant had a different perspective on the affordances of each individual tool in their usefulness for fostering a sense of belonging and social presence. This was of particular interest as it indicates that one tool can afford a diversity of factors that may have a particular resonance with individual participants. The findings highlight the importance of lecturers needing to take into account the different affordances of online tools and the different ways that students might use them. Therefore, this study is in a position to inform the development of this and other online teacher education programmes

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  • Jack's story: A need to know

    Archard, Sara; Archard, Simon (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article examines a recent case study exploring evidence that children in early childhood services can use ICT to direct their own inquiry learning. A qualitative case study involving an interview and the learning story tool of assessment was conducted to describe the experience of one child and his teacher. They engaged in sustained shared thinking using ICT as a tool to facilitate inquiry in an early childhood setting. The findings indicate that children in early childhood settings can use ICT to direct their own inquiry learning. Two key factors are identified that enable this. These factors are the child as an active learner, and a supportive well resourced learning environment. In this article we argue that these factors need to be acknowledged in teaching practice if ICT is to be used in meaningful and purposeful ways.

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  • Jessica connects: A case study focussing on one child’s use of information and communication technology (ICT) in an early childhood education setting

    Archard, Sara; Archard, Simon (2016)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is playing an ever increasing role in the lives of people which include young children; The role of ICT in early childhood educational services in Aotearoa New Zealand is still being argued despite curriculum, assessment and policy expectations that endorse and support its integration into practice. This chapter draws upon a small, qualitative case study involving young children and their uses of ICT in one early childhood education setting in Aotearoa New Zealand. A socio-cultural perspective has been used to recognise and examine the notion of children’s understanding and practices of ICT. In this chapter the focus is on Jessica, aged 4 years old, and the ways she uses ICT in her life as tool to document and share her learning and interests. These uses also reflect Jessica as a competent and confident learner using ICT as a cultural tool to mediate her learning in her home and early childhood education setting. The researchers examine the way ICT practices can contribute and fulfil curriculum and policy intentions that can support and endorse the competent, confident learner that reflects the curriculum principle of Empowerment. The chapter supports the view that ICT can be used to enhance the empowerment of the learner. We conclude that the early childhood curriculum and policy in Aotearoa New Zealand justifies the place of ICT in early childhood settings and should guide and inform teachers to use it as a valued learning and teaching tool. The researchers are of the opinion that the teachers have an active and collaborative role in responding to the needs of the 21st century learner to direct their own learning and that this can be guided by the curriculum aspirations in the principle of Empowerment.

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  • Podcasts as a conversational pedagogy

    Archard, Sara; Merry, Rosina (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The use of technology such as podcasts, social networking sites, wikis, and Google docs for communicating information which supports teaching and learning in tertiary institutions is well documented (Bates, 2005). These tools have been shown to enhance traditional lectures and tutorials (Salmon, 2007). Little attention, however, has been given to the use of conversational approaches when using these tools and their potential in developing alternative pedagogical approaches to teaching. This article examines the use of a conversational style podcast in an online pre-service early childhood teacher education programme. The podcasts were initially used to disseminate information and respond to the students’ needs, however, their conversational use revealed a number of unexpected outcomes. Analysis of the podcast conversations that occurred between the two lecturers, and the student feedback to these, were used to identify unexpected outcomes for students enrolled in the programme. These included the ‘humanising’ of the e-learning environment and the sense of community that emerged. This paper argues that the affordance of conversational podcasts personalises the e-learning environment, enhances students’ and lecturers’ motivation, and engenders a greater connectedness with the university context.

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