3 results for Arendt, J

  • Melatonin in older people with age-related sleep maintenance problems: A comparison with age matched normal sleepers

    Baskett, JJ; Wood, Philip; Broad, Joanna; Duncan, JR; English, J; Arendt, J (2001)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Study Objectives: To determine whether older people with age-related sleep maintenance problems have significantly lower melatonin levels than comparable normal sleepers. Design: Case-control study. Setting A largely urban population, Auckland, New Zealand. Participants: People over the age of 65 years, who either slept normally, or had age-related sleep maintenance problems. Participants were recruited through media advertising, and local interest groups. Initial screening was by mail (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), followed by interviews at a hospital day clinic. Exclusions included those with depression, cognitive impairment, medical and/or environmental problems which might impair sleep. Interventions: N/A Measurements & Results: A metabolite of plasma melatonin, 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) was measured in the urine of 57 normal sleepers, and 53 people with age-related problems over 24 hours in three aliquots: 12:00-19:00h, 19:00-07:00h, 07:00-12:00h. There were clear differences in self reported quality of sleep but no difference in mean aMT6s 24 hour or total night excretory levels, or night/day ratios. Conclusions: Older people with age-related sleep maintenance problems do not have lower melatonin levels than older people reporting normal sleep.

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  • Does melatonin improve sleep in older people? A randomised crossover trial

    Baskett, Jonathan; Broad, Joanna; Wood, Philip; Duncan, John; Pledger, Megan; English, J; Arendt, J (2003)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Study objective: to determine whether melatonin will improve quality of sleep in healthy older people with age‐related sleep maintenance problems. Design: a double blind randomised placebo controlled crossover trial in healthy older volunteers. Setting: a largely urban population, Auckland, New Zealand. Participants: participants were part of the larger Possible Role of Melatonin in Sleep of Elders study. People 65 years or more of age were recruited through widespread advertising. We screened 414 potential participants by mail using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and selected 194 for clinic interview. Exclusions included depression, cognitive impairment, hypnosedative medications, sleep phase abnormalities, medical and/or environmental problems that might impair sleep. Twenty normal and 20 problem sleepers were randomly allocated for this study from a larger sample of 60 normal and 60 problem sleepers. Measurements and results: 24‐hour urine 6‐sulphatoxymelatonin was measured to estimate melatonin secretion in each participant. Five milligrams of melatonin, or matching placebo were each taken at bedtime for 4 weeks, separated by a 4‐week washout period. Sleep quality was measured using sleep diaries, the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire, and actigraphy. There was a significant difference between the groups in self‐reported sleep quality indicators at entry, but no difference in melatonin secretion. Melatonin did not significantly improve any sleep parameter measured in either group. Conclusion: 5 mg of fast release melatonin taken at bedtime does not improve the quality of sleep in older people with age‐related sleep maintenance problems.

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  • Circadian-related sleep disorders and sleep medication use in the New Zealand blind population: an observational prevalence survey.

    Warman, Guy; Pawley, Matthew; Bolton, C; Cheeseman, James; Fernando, Antonio; Arendt, J; Wirz-Justice, A (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Study Objectives: To determine the prevalence of self-reported circadian-related sleep disorders, sleep medication and melatonin use in the New Zealand blind population. Design: A telephone survey incorporating 62 questions on sleep habits and medication together with validated questionnaires on sleep quality, chronotype and seasonality. Participants: Participants were grouped into: (i) 157 with reduced conscious perception of light (RLP); (ii) 156 visually impaired with no reduction in light perception (LP) matched for age, sex and socioeconomic status, and (iii) 156 matched fully-sighted controls (FS). Sleep Habits and Disturbances: The incidence of sleep disorders, daytime somnolence, insomnia and sleep timing problems was significantly higher in RLP and LP compared to the FS controls (p,0.001). The RLP group had the highest incidence (55%) of sleep timing problems, and 26% showed drifting sleep patterns (vs. 4% FS). Odds ratios for unconventional sleep timing were 2.41 (RLP) and 1.63 (LP) compared to FS controls. For drifting sleep patterns, they were 7.3 (RLP) and 6.0 (LP). Medication Use: Zopiclone was the most frequently prescribed sleep medication. Melatonin was used by only 4% in the RLP group and 2% in the LP group. Conclusions: Extrapolations from the current study suggest that 3,000 blind and visually impaired New Zealanders may suffer from circadian-related sleep problems, and that of these, fewer than 15% have been prescribed melatonin. This may represent a therapeutic gap in the treatment of circadian-related sleep disorders in New Zealand, findings that may generalize to other countries.

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