3 results for Arksey, H

  • Caregiver assessment of support need, reaction to care, and assessment of depression

    Jorgensen, Diane; Arksey, H; Parsons, Matthew; Jacobs, Stephen (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Like governments worldwide, New Zealand has concerns about the future provision of long term care. Deinstitutionalisation for younger people and 'ageing-in-place' initiatives supporting older people in their own homes, have increased the need for family members to provide support. However, the New Zealand government has now started to address informal carers’ needs by launching the Carers' Strategy and Five-year Action Plan and introducing the right to request flexible working arrangements for people with caring responsibilities. This article presents empirical evidence from 300 telephone interviews with carers conducted between December 2007 and August 2008. Data were collected using two well validated scales: Centre for Epidemiologic Short Depression (CES-D10) and Caregivers Reaction Assessment (CRA). Carers were also asked open-ended questions regarding their support and additional help needed. Analysis of participants’ scores on CES-D10 and CRA, showed significant correlation (p=s chosen field and usually at lower pay. Overall, findings show New Zealand carers experience similar difficulties faced by carers in other countries. If the government wishes to successfully pursue initiatives like ageing-in-place, more resources are needed to adequately support carers. At present, this important sector of the population is undervalued and under provided for.

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  • The New Zealand informal caregivers and their unmet needs

    Jorgensen, Diane; Parsons, Matthew; Jacobs, Stephen; Arksey, H (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim. To identify the characteristics and demographics of the New Zealand caregiver and their unmet support needs. Method. During December 2007 -August 2008, 300 caregivers were recruited to participate throughout New Zealand. Mixed methods data were collected by telephone, using two well validated scales: Centre for Epidemiology Studies Depression and Caregivers Reaction Assessment. Caregivers were also asked open-ended questions regarding their support and additional help needed. Analysis was by descriptive statistics and General Inductive approach Results. Caregivers aged 30-39 had the highest depression, while a larger group shared the highest stress (ages 30-59). Caregivers commonly discussed adverse effects of caregiving on lifestyle, health and financial situations. Lack of information and assistance were concerns and respite was inadequate. Overall, less than one percent of caregivers of people under the age of 65 and four percent of caregivers of older people were happy with the support received. Caregivers wanted more financial assistance, information, reliable support workers, flexible respite, and recognition for their caregiving role. Conclusion. If the government wishes to have more people with disabilities or chronic illness living at home, greater resources are needed to adequately support caregivers. At present this important sector of the population is undervalued and under provided for.

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  • Why Do Older People in New Zealand Enter Residential Care Rather than Choosing to Remain at Home, and Who Makes that Decision?

    Jorgensen, Diane; Arksey, H; Parsons, Matthew; Senior, H; Thomas, David (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objectives: To investigate why older people with high support needs entered residential care and who made that decision. Methods: Longitudinal study in three New Zealand cities. Participants: older people (n=144); (unpaid) caregivers (n=47); service co-ordinators (n=12); multidisciplinary team members (n=4). Questionnaires: InterRAI Minimum Data Set Assessments Home Care; Caregiver Reaction Assessment; Mastery and control. Semi-structured interview questions focussing on decision-making, and concerns that might result in residential care entry. Interviews were at baseline and six months, or on entering residential care. Results: Significant factors were found, which increased the likelihood of residential care entry for older people. These included: high scoring dependency on the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) scale, and an adult child living some distance away. The evidence from the study participant groups highlighted contrasting views about who was important in the decision making about entry to residential care. Older people who had moved into residential care generally thought that doctors had played a key role, whereas family members and professionals tended to consider the move was the caregiver’s decision. Older people with good levels of knowledge about services and support, and good housing, were more likely to continue to live in the community. Conclusions: Policy makers and funders need to understand the importance of clear communication, information and appropriate support services for older people who wish to remain at home, and their caregivers.

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