2 results for Arnephy, J.

  • Environmental Sound Perception of Cochlear Implant Users

    Looi, V.; Arnephy, J.; O'Beirne, G.A. (2007)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Introduction Most current adult cochlear implant (CI) users achieve higher open-set speech perception scores post- surgery than pre- surgery, a factor which greatly improves their overall quality of life. There is little published research assessing the ability of CI users to identify environmental sounds, an important skill which also impacts upon a patient’s quality of life. This study compared adult CI users to normally hearing (NH) listeners in their ability to identify various environmental sounds. The Environmental Sounds Perception Test (ESPT) developed for this study was more difficult and more comprehensive than those used in current studies, in order to reduce the likelihood of any potential ceiling effect affecting the results. It was hypothesised that the CI users would score lower than similarly-aged NH listeners on the ESPT.

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  • Environmental Sound Perception of Cochlear Implant Users

    Looi, V.; Arnephy, J. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new test of environmental sound perception, The Environmental Sounds Perception Test (EST), and to both compare the performance of experienced cochlear implant (CI) recipients to age-equivalent normally hearing (NH) listeners using this new test, as well as pilot test its clinical use as a pre-to-post assessment tool. The closed-set EST consisted of 45 different sounds classified into 9 categories, with each sound being represented by two different tokens. The results showed that the NH participants scored significantly higher than the experienced CI users (p < 0.001). For the Pre-to-post CI group, higher scores were obtained post-surgery with the CI; this difference was approaching significance (p = 0.068). Overall these results suggest that CI recipients are poorer than NH participants, but better than hearing aid users with similar level of hearing loss, on the EST.

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