4 results for Aspin, Clive

  • Mouri matters Contextualizing mouri in Māori health discourse

    Penehira, Mera; Smith, Linda Tuhiwai; Green, Alison; Aspin, Clive (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The vision statement of Te Reo o Taranaki, “Tuku reo, tuku mouri: language, culture, crossing generations”, embodies the essence of an understanding of mouri which goes beyond the simple dictionary translations of “life force” or “life essence”. Indeed, there are numerous oral narratives—whakataukī (proverbs), waiata (songs), haka (dance), karanga (ceremonial call), whaikōrero (formal speech), karakia (prayers and incantations)—from the present day to our earliest records of Māori history that engage the notion of mouri. The purpose of this paper is to examine current understandings of mouri and, by linking the concept with linguistic, cultural and intergenerational terms—as in the Taranaki example—it will be argued that mouri is something of significance to our “being” and to our wellbeing.

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  • Māori and indigenous views on R and R: Resistance and Resilience

    Penehira, Mera; Green, Alison; Smith, Linda Tuhiwai; Aspin, Clive (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article explores the development of Mäori and Indigenous frameworks of resilience, considering the impact of engaging with largely State- led notions of resilience on Mäori development. We highlight the closely linked notion of resistance, asserting the necessity of a fi rm political analysis from Indigenous researchers engaged in this discourse. One of the Indigenous criticisms of resilience theories is that by defi nition they assume an acceptance of responsibility for our position as disadvantaged individuals. That is, by examining and developing theories and models of resilience we buy into the idea that this is the way it is and we need simply to get better at bouncing back and being resilient. Resistance, however, represents an approach of collective fi ght- back, exposing the inequitable distribution of power, and actively opposing negative social, political and economic infl uences. This article represents a Mäori Indigenous political response to the resilience discourse.

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  • HIV diagnoses in indigenous peoples: comparison of Australia, Canada and New Zealand

    Shea, Beverley; Aspin, Clive; Ward, James; Archibald, Chris; Dickson, Nigel; McDonald, Ann; Penehira, Mera; Halverson, Jessica; Masching, Renee; McAllister, Sue; Smith, Linda Tuhiwai; Kaldor, John M.; Andersson, Neil (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In industrial countries, a number of factors put indigenous peoples at increased risk of HIV infection. National surveillance data between 1999 and 2008 provided diagnoses for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (Australia), First Nations, Inuit and Métis (Canada excluding Ontario and Quebec) and Māori (New Zealand). Each country provided similar data for a non-indigenous comparison population. Direct standardisation used the 2001 Canadian Aboriginal male population for comparison of five-year diagnosis rates in 1999–2003 and 2004–2008. Using the general population as denominators, we report diagnosis ratios for presumed heterosexual transmission, men who have sex with men (MSM) and intravenous drug users (IDU). Age standardised HIV diagnosis rates in indigenous peoples in Canada in 2004–2008 (178.1 and 178.4/100 000 for men and women respectively) were higher than in Australia (48.5 and 12.9/100 000) and New Zealand (41.9 and 4.3/100 000). Higher HIV diagnosis rates related to heterosexual contact among Aboriginal peoples, especially women, in Canada confirm a widening epidemic beyond the conventional risk groups. This potential of a generalised epidemic requires urgent attention in Aboriginal communities; available evidence can inform policy and action by all stakeholders. Although less striking in Australia and New Zealand, these findings may be relevant to indigenous peoples in other countries.

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  • Sexual Coercion among Gay Men, Bisexual Men and Takatāpui Tāne in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    Fenaughty, John; Braun, Virginia; Gavey, Nicola; Aspin, Clive; Reynolds, Paul; Schmidt, Johanna (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background • The existence of sexual assault, sexual coercion and unwanted sex among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men is seldom acknowledged — within gay communities, society at large, or in policy. • Although prevalence is difficult to determine, international research has established that sexual assault, sexual coercion and unwanted sex are experienced by a significant number of gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men. Our project • This project consisted of two separate, but related, studies: a broader project, and a Kaupapa Māori project. • The broader project was designed to explore the phenomenon of sexual coercion among gay and bisexual men in Aotearoa/New Zealand. • It did not set out to investigate the broader issue of sexual assault against gay and bisexual men by men who do not identify as gay or bisexual (i.e., sexual violence which could more easily be categorised as hate crime). • Twenty-three key informants were interviewed about their observations and views on sexual coercion among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men. • Eighteen gay and bisexual men were interviewed about their experiences of sexual coercion. • Six focus groups were held with gay and bisexual men in order to generate accounts about how sexuality is understood and negotiated in gay communities. • Five takatāpui tāne were interviewed for the Kaupapa Māori project on Māori men’s experiences of sexual coercion.

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