3 results for Ataman, M. Berk

  • Building brands

    Ataman, M. Berk; Mela, Carl F.; van Heerde, Harald J. (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Which marketing strategies are most effective for introducing new brands? This paper sheds light on this question by ascribing growth performance to firms' postlaunch marketing choices. We decompose the success of a new brand into its ultimate market potential and the rate at which it achieves this potential. To achieve this aim we formulate a Bayesian dynamic linear model (DLM) of repeat purchase diffusion wherein growth and market potential are directly linked to the new brand's long-term advertising, promotion, distribution, and product strategy. We perform the analysis on 225 new-brand introductions across 22 repeat-purchase product categories over five years to develop generalized findings about the correlates of new-brand success. We find that access to distribution breadth plays the greatest role in the success of a new brand, and that investments in distribution and product innovation lead to greater marginal increases in sales for new brands than either discounting, feature/display, or advertising. Moreover, distribution interacts with other strategies to enhance their effectiveness. These findings underscore the utility of extending marketing mix models of new-brand performance to include product and distribution decisions.

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  • The long-term effect of marketing strategy on brand sales.

    Ataman, M. Berk; van Heerde, Harald J.; Mela, Carl F. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Few studies have considered the relative role of the integrated marketing mix (advertising, price promotion, product, and place) on the long-term performance of mature brands, instead emphasizing advertising and price promotion. Thus, little guidance is available to firms regarding the relative efficacy of their various marketing expenditures over the long run. To investigate this issue, the authors apply a multivariate dynamic linear transfer function model to five years of advertising and scanner data for 25 product categories and 70 brands in France. The findings indicate that the total (short-term plus long-term) sales elasticity is 1.37 for product and .74 for distribution. Conversely, the total elasticities for advertising and discounting are only .13 and .04, respectively. This result stands in marked contrast to the previous emphasis in the literature on price promotions and advertising. The authors further find that the long-term effects of discounting are one-third the magnitude of the short-term effects. The ratio is reversed from other aspects of the mix (in which long-term effects exceed four times the short-term effects), underscoring the strategic role of these tools in brand sales.

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  • Consumer packaged goods in France: National brands, regional chains and local branding

    Ataman, M. Berk; Mela, Carl F.; van Heerde, Harald J. (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The authors document several striking general geographic patterns in the performance of national brands using a large longitudinal scanner database that spans many consumer packaged goods categories and U.S. regional markets. Across markets, they observe that for a typical national brand, the geographic variation in market shares, perceived quality levels, and local dominance is so large that it questions the concept and relevance of a “national brand.” Across time, the authors find that the geographic differences in market shares for national brands are persistent and thus are attributed to “long-term” outcomes. The objective of this article is to open a discussion on these surprising stylized findings related to geography in the food and beverage industries. The authors argue that geographically indexed consumer packaged goods data contain rich information about long-term marketing outcomes that offer several new directions for further research.

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