3 results for Aumua, Linda

  • The Waitakere Pacific community and tertiary education institute relationships

    Aumua, Linda (2008)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research examined the relationship between a Tertiary Education Institution (TEI) other Tertiary Education providers and the Pacific community in Waitakere City, West Auckland. The research identified issues that have arisen from the mutual desire of providers of tertiary education and the Pacific communities’ to engage but failing to do so. It centres on their inability to identify what is required to establish effective relationships. Tertiary education polices that have been developed have called for community engagement and consultation under a Pacific responsiveness strategy specified and upheld by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC). The TEC established a process of mandatory consultation requiring a TEI (local Polytechnic) to manage and co ordinate Regional Facilitation Forums in Waitakere City, West Auckland. These forums in particular were considered vital vehicles for the TEC to connect with the community. However, the Waitakere Pacific community had not participated in these forums. Invitations to participate received little response and Pacific attendance was extraordinarily low. This research examined some of the reasons for the lack of response and subsequent lack engagement between the TEI and the Pacific community. It examines policy and policymaking processes, infrastructure, power imbalances, and issues of trust and student success. The type of relationship established also sheds light on factors that influence participation, delivery, outcomes and acceptance of providers of tertiary education within this community. The research utilises a qualitative methodology, included Pacific and Reflexivity methodology to examine the relationships and to identify issues surrounding the community and the providers. A case study approach enables insight through examining other examples of relationships that Pacific communities and organisations have created, maintained and in some cases ended. The case studies also revealed the complexities in relationships between community, government agencies, local government and schools, identifying some of the issues and concerns experienced through inclusiveness and the incorporation of Pacific peoples into mainstream western structures. The research identifies the gap between the TEC policy makers and the Pacific community and the controversial relationship that reflects the issues and TEI positions in relation to the Pacific community. Furthermore, the study demonstrates the complexities around engagement and inclusiveness for a growing Pacific community that has a strong aspiration for its members to achieve success through education and in particular tertiary education.

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  • Akoaga : efficacy, agency, achievement and success in the tertiary sector : focus on students and parents from Pasifika communities

    Marat, Deepa; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Latu, Savae; Aumua, Linda; Talakai, Malia; Sun, Kang (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The term akoaga has a pan-Polynesian origin and meaning. In the Samoan language, the term can be broken into two root words, ako and aga. Ako or ato means basket and aga means measurements associated with weaving.

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  • Whaia te iti kahurangi: Efficacy, agency, achievement and success in the tertiary sector: Focus on students and parents from Pasifika communities

    Marat, Deepa; Latu, Savae; Aumua, Linda; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Talakai, Malia; Sun, Kang (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The present study is situated in Unitec Institute of Technology, a dynamic tertiary institution in New Zealand, catering to the needs of a large and diverse student population enrolled in courses ranging from certificate level to doctoral programmes. Annual summative evaluations of achievement of students reveal ethnicity based disparities in the rate of success and retention of undergraduate students, with Pasifika students positioned in the lower levels as compared to mainstream and Maori students in both Unitec campuses. In this research project, the reasons underpinning this disparity is assessed from the context of efficacy and agency of students, two constructs which correlate with academic achievement. Led by a research design underpinned by Kaupapa Maori, Pasifika, mainstream methodologies, and ancient philosophies, the findings are reported mainly from the perspectives of student and parent participants from Pasifika communities. Although an inclusive approach of inviting tertiary students across all ethnicities that had enrolled for a qualification programme to participate was the norm, the central aim was to unravel some of the challenges faced by participants from the Pasifika community which precluded optimal achievement. Unitec Centre for Pacific approved Tertiary Education Commission funding for this research. Pasifika parents with teenagers enrolled in secondary schools or/ and with children in the tertiary sector were also invited to participate in focus groups to share their perspectives on higher education, and how they coped with emerging challenges. A mixed-methods approach was used to assess self-efficacy, agency, and perceptions of success. Findings reveal students in the tertiary sector reporting high levels of efficacy. Agency and perception of success seems to be more collective in nature, with a sense of responsibility towards oneself and one’s family acting as agentic forces to succeed in the tertiary sector. Students are intent upon setting goals, using learning strategies, taking responsibility for their learning and attaining them. Teacher participation in this research was almost non-existent, despite being part of the research design. This was a major limitation of the study, since there is no empirical data on culturally sensitive teaching strategies in use. The findings also capture the critical role of family, teachers, support staff, and peers in student achievement and success in bicultural and multi-cultural tertiary education context.

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