3 results for Awio, Godwin

  • Alternative accountability in the Ugandan community-led HIV/AIDS programme

    Awio, Godwin (2007-10-25)

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Internationally, many public sector reform initiatives have been undertaken over the last three decades under the label New Public Management (NPM), with improvements in accountability and management among their main objectives. This thesis draws on social capital theory to examine the potential of a Ugandan community-led HIV/AIDS programme to supplement NPM approaches to public service delivery and accountability. Hermeneutics methodology is used to guide the research design and the interpretation of evidence.The findings of this study suggest that Uganda's community-led HIV/AIDS initiatives operate within a "bottom-up" accountability framework, characterized by the community taking a role in budgeting, program implementation, reporting, project-oversight, and audit activities. In regard to accounting practices, this study reveals that Ugandan community projects use basic and simple accounting procedures. The findings suggest that simple communal accountability mechanisms can compensate for the types of formal control mechanisms typically promoted within NPM-style reforms. The findings also suggest that multiple accountability relationships can operate in the form of both hierarchical and lateral accountability practices and that these multiple accountability relationships lead to tighter control and accurate accountability, even though formal accountability mechanisms may be weak.This study identified some challenges for community-led service delivery initiatives, including the potential for corrupt practices in some community groups and variations in the level of participation of group members in the execution of various tasks. Further, several areas for further research have been identified. These include the measurement of social capital within community groups and the establishment of measures of group capacities.This study has revealed the latent accountability technology of a "bottom-up" communitarian accountability framework and demonstrated its potential as a complement to NPM models of service delivery and accountability. As an accountability innovation, it needs to be keenly watched as further field experiences emerge over time and reveal more of its potential in developing countries, and perhaps beyond.

    View record details
  • Social capital and accountability in grass-roots NGOs: The case of the Ugandan community-led HIV/AIDS initiative

    Awio, Godwin; Northcott, Deryl; Lawrence, Stewart R. (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Purpose – This paper aims to examine how small, grass-roots non-governmental organisations (NGOs) account for their actions and expenditures and how this accountability is discharged to, and benefits, the citizens they serve. Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on social capital theory to inform an interpretive analysis of documentary and interview evidence. The empirical material is derived from CHAI policy and project documents, coupled with interviews with 75 participants at the national, district and community levels of the CHAI programme. An illustrative case study is presented of an NGO that delivers welfare services to a Ugandan community affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Findings – The research finds that, by harnessing the attributes of social capital, grass-roots NGOs can supplement formal accountability obligations to funders with effective “bottom-up” accountability to an often overlooked NGO stakeholder group – the service beneficiaries, with positive outcomes for social services delivery. Research limitations/implications – The research examines a single community-led public welfare initiative (the Ugandan CHAI), with a particular focus on one illustrative grass-roots NGO within that programme. Nevertheless, it offers insights into how accountability mechanisms can be reconceptualised to suit the context of developing countries where smaller NGOs increasingly operate. Practical implications – The potential for less formal, “bottom-up” accountability mechanisms is illustrated using the case of the Ugandan community-led HIV/AIDS initiative (CHAI), a programme for delivering social services to communities ravaged by the effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Originality/value – This research addresses the lack of empirical studies of smaller, grass-roots NGOs in the accounting literature. It also contributes to the under-researched area of how NGOs can appropriately discharge their accountability obligations to beneficiaries. The use of social capital theory to inform the study is also a novel contribution of this paper.

    View record details
  • Community-led initiatives: reforms for better accountability?

    Awio, Godwin; Lawrence, Stewart R.; Northcott, Deryl (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Purpose – This paper sets out to contrast the ubiquitous, globalizing influence of new public management (NPM) with an alternative approach more attuned to the local needs of communities, especially those with health and economic problems in less-developed countries. The Ugandan Community-led HIV/AIDS Initiative is drawn on to contrast the operation of “bottom-up” accountability – whereby the deliverers of public services are accountable primarily to the communities they serve – with the usual expectations of an NPM model, which instead focuses on holding public sector managers accountable to their political masters. Design/methodology/approach – A hermeneutics approach is adopted to interpret evidence from: government policy documents; interactions and interviews with public sector actors at national, district and community levels; and one author's own pre-understanding from his role with the Uganda AIDS Commission. Findings – This Ugandan illustration suggests potential benefits from importing workable aspects of NPM reforms while at the same time exploring other service delivery and accountability options that fit the needs of target communities in less-developed countries. Research limitations/implications – Uganda's adoption of the outlined community-led approach has important implications for the (ir)relevance debate around NPM reforms in developing countries. However, as this paper is based on a single initiative in one country, it represents only a first step towards understanding the potential for innovative public sector models to add value in developing countries. Practical implications – The findings point to community-led approaches, such as those adopted in Uganda, as a promising alternative to NPM models for improving public service delivery and financial accountability in less-developed countries. Originality/value – Communitarian and social capital theoretical perspectives are drawn on to analyse novel public sector management and accountability mechanisms and compare the findings with dominant NPM perspectives. The research context contributes new understanding of how NPM reforms might be adapted and supplemented to benefit developing nations.

    View record details