2 results for Aydal, Emine G.

  • A Comparison of State-Based Modelling Tools for Model Validation

    Aydal, Emine G.; Utting, Mark; Woodcock, Jim (2008)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    In model-based testing, one of the biggest decisions taken before modelling is the modelling language and the model analysis tool to be used to model the system under investigation. UML, Alloy and Z are examples of popular state-based modelling languages. In the literature, there has been research about the similarities and the differences between modelling languages. However, we believe that, in addition to recognising the expressive power of modelling languages, it is crucial to detect the capabilities and the weaknesses of analysis tools that parse and analyse models written in these languages. In order to explore this area, we have chosen four model analysis tools: USE, Alloy Analyzer, ZLive and ProZ and observed how modelling and validation stages of MBT are handled by these tools for the same system. Through this experiment, we not only concretise the tasks that form the modelling and validation stages of MBT process, but also reveal how efficiently these tasks are carried out in different tools.

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  • Putting formal specifications under the magnifying glass: Model-based testing for validation

    Aydal, Emine G.; Paige, Richard F.; Utting, Mark; Woodcock, Jim (2009)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    A software development process is effectively an abstract form of model transformation, starting from an end-user model of requirements, through to a system model for which code can be automatically generated. The success (or failure) of such a transformation depends substantially on obtaining a correct, well-formed initial model that captures user concerns. Model-based testing automates black box testing based on the model of the system under analysis. This paper proposes and evaluates a novel model-based testing technique that aims to reveal specification/requirement-related errors by generating test cases from a test model and exercising them on the design model. The case study outlined in the paper shows that a separate test model not only increases the level of objectivity of the requirements, but also supports the validation of the system under test through test case generation. The results obtained from the case study support the hypothesis that there may be discrepancies between the formal specification of the system modeled at developer end and the problem to be solved, and using solely formal verification methods may not be sufficient to reveal these. The approach presented in this paper aims at providing means to obtain greater confidence in the design model that is used as the basis for code generation.

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