10 results for Benseman, John, Unclassified

  • Research-informed teaching of adults : a worthy alternative to old habits and hearsay?

    Benseman, John (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    How and why teachers teach the way they do is central to understanding the impact of education on learners. While many professions have integrated research findings into their practitioners’ practice, education’s record is less consistent in this respect. This paper outlines the case for teachers to become research-informed in their teaching (RIT). It firstly considers what is involved in being research-informed, what types of research are most relevant, why it warrants consideration as well as issues associated with it. It then reviews RIT in the New Zealand context and particularly in relation to teaching adults. Finally, the paper looks at how an RIT approach might be implemented.

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  • Working in the light of evidence, as well as commitment. A literature review of the best available evidence about effective adult literacy, numeracy and language teaching

    Benseman, John; Sutton, Alison; Lander, J. (2005)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The purpose of this literature review is to provide a critical evaluation of the available research evidence about effective practices in literacy, numeracy and language (LNL) teaching and programme provision in order to inform policy development within the broader arena of foundation learning. Despite the growing recognition of the importance of LNL, there is still a dearth of specific research relating to this area in New Zealand and the situation is only marginally better overseas. It is noteworthy however that in the process of undertaking this review, we have become aware of a considerable number of substantial, intervention studies that are currently underway or due for completion in 2005-2006. The results of these studies are likely to be very useful to us in future.

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  • Case study : United States

    Benseman, John; Comings, J. (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    As with many other OECD countries, the United States of America (U.S.) estimated the literacy skills of its adult population as part of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS). The U.S. published the results of its National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS), which employed what became the English version of the IALS test, in 1994 (citation1), and then published the results of a second estimate in 2006 after the completion of the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL), which employed the same test. The NAAL (citation2) changed the familiar five levels of skill identified in the IALS to four levels, labelled below basic, basic, intermediate, and proficient. In addition, it dropped several million adults from the sample because they could not answer any of the test questions. The score range in below basic is slightly below that of IALS Level 1, and the score range in basic is slightly below that of IALS Level 2. Though the reporting of NAAL levels is different, any particular score on the NAAL is equivalent to that score on the IALS and NALS.

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  • Foundation learning in New Zealand: an overview

    Benseman, John (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This book comes at a timely point in the development of the foundation skills sector in New Zealand. The purpose of this first chapter is to provide an overall context, by reviewing what is meant by the term foundation skills and its various synonyms before moving on to a brief history of the sector in New Zealand and in particular, the significance of the 1996 International Adult Literacy Survey that proved to be a turning-point in its development. Following a discussion of the broader significance of research and evaluation, the chapter then reviews where we stand at present in terms of policy, the range of provision operating and the learners that it serves. Finally, an outline is provided of the book’s chapters and what they cover.

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  • "I'm a different person now" : an evaluation of the Manukau Family Literacy Program (MFLP)

    Benseman, John (2004)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Manukau Family Literacy Programmes (MFLP) The MFLP grew out of an initiative by the Literacy Taskforce of the City of Manukau Education Trust (COMET). The initial planning for the programmes was undertaken during 2002, culminating in two pilot sites starting operation in 2003 at Bairds Otara and Rowandale in Manurewa. Four sites are planned for 2004.

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  • OECD/CERI Formative assessment project background report : New Zealand

    Benseman, John (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    While there had been a community-based adult literacy movement active in New Zealand since the late 1970s (Hill, 1990), the sector’s provision and political presence was marginal at best. Its advocates struggled to establish a secure funding source without a research base, within an educational system that had long prided itself on its child literacy achievements and therefore had scepticism about the existence of adult literacy issues. The results from the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) in 1996 proved to be a turning-point, as it provided the first substantial evidence of the levels of New Zealand adults’ basic skills. Like a lot of comparable countries such as Canada, the US and Australia, the IALS results (OECD, 1997) showed that approximately one quarter of New Zealand adults were operating at Level 1 and a similar proportion at Level 2. While all groups were represented to some degree in the lower skill categories, there were disproportionately higher numbers of Pacific Islanders,1 Maori2, those who have a first language other than English, those with minimal secondary education, older people and those not in employment. Further analyses (Ministry of Education, 2004; Workbase, 1998) showed concentrations of low skill populations in some rural areas (especially the Far North and the eastern North Island) and the Auckland metropolitan area and in blue-collar occupations, the manufacturing, agricultural, hunting and fishing industries. These results are reasonably akin to other countries with which New Zealand traditionally compares itself such as Australia, Canada and the US, but behind others like Sweden and the Netherlands.

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  • Family literacy – a case study in how to develop policy

    Benseman, John; Sutton, Alison (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    'Adult learning makes a difference - to the economy of course, to health, well-being, confidence and to our ability to help our children. Alan Tuckett - 4 December 2006 Alan has steadfastly believed that the inherent power of adult learning has been to change adults’ self-perceptions and subsequently their worlds through learning what they needed relevant to their particular interests and issues. Intergenerational family literacy epitomises relevant adult learning. Family literacy programmes engage adults in their role as parents, providing learning opportunities for them to enhance their literacy and, also their parenting skills, particularly in relation to their children’s emerging literacy skills. The programmes recognise adults as learners in their own right, but also as powerful influences on those around them in their homes and communities.

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  • Pacific peoples and tertiary education: issues of participation

    Benseman, John; Anae, Melani; Anderson, Helen; Coxon, Eve (2002)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The purpose of this research study was, therefore, to gather qualitative information on the actual and perceived barriers to participation in tertiary education and training for Pacific peoples. The study had a particular mission to develop an understanding of the experiences and perceptions of Pacific communities, in order to inform future policies aimed at addressing barriers to Pacific people’s participation in tertiary education and training. Specific areas for the project to investigate included: • current participation patterns and steps taken in different tertiary education institutions to identify and remove barriers; • the views of Pacific peoples who have participated successfully in tertiary education, those who have participated but not completed their studies, and those who have not participated in tertiary education; and • the views of a range of Pacific community members, including the families of potential students as to why some have succeeded and the barriers to students’ participation. The following assumptions were made in designing the research: • that ‘tertiary education’ includes universities, polytechnics, colleges of education and private training establishments (PTEs); • that Pacific peoples can enter tertiary education both as school-leavers and as mature-age adults, and that the research needs to address these groups as taking different routes with different accompanying issues; • that the term ‘Pacific peoples’ contains considerable cultural and historical diversity which will need to be addressed in appropriate ways by the researchers; and • that there are already in existence successful programmes and strategies in this area and that it is important to document and analyse these success stories as part of this project

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  • Adult education : New Zealand, to 2012

    Benseman, John (2013-11-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Adult education, New Zealand, to 2012. In its broadest sense, adult education refers to the education of anyone beyond school-age. Historically, the sector has constantly evolved as elements of its provision have matured into autonomous sectors in their own right, leaving adult education to constantly re-invent itself on the boundaries of the educational mainstream in its mission of meeting adult learner needs. Maori education, Colonial adult education, Workers’ Educational Association (WEA), After World War I, Depression and World War II, Council of Adult Education, Including new populations in adult education - Maori, Women, From the mid-twentieth century, Reorganisation from the 1970s, Challenges of neoliberal policy and Global Financial Crisis, Significance of adult education in New Zealand.

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  • Pedagogy in practice : an observational study of literacy, numeracy and language teachers.

    Benseman, John; Lander, J.; Sutton, Alison (2005)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of this study was to gain an overview of how teachers teach literacy, numeracy and language (LNL) in New Zealand, by observing 15 literacy, language and numeracy teachers from tertiary institutions, community organisations, workplaces and private training establishments. The teachers were observed for an average of 167 minutes over two sessions; they were also interviewed after the first observation session. The sample included 1:1 teachers, as well as those who teach in small groups and classes. Data from the observations was recorded on specially designed data sheets; notes were taken by the observers and both the sessions and interviews were recorded wherever possible.

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