21 results for Dalziel, P., Book

  • Improving learning outcomes by seeing “vision”: teaching economics to resource students

    Dalziel, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This paper describes an innovative approach to teaching introductory economics to students enrolled in resource degrees. A new course was designed to help these students engage with the subject by incorporating their “vision” into the study of economic principles. Quantitative evidence supported the hypothesis that first-year resource students have a different vision of economics than commerce students, and suggested that the new course improved learning outcomes for this group of students.

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  • Forecast of skills demand in the high tech sector in Canterbury : phase two

    Dalziel, P.; Saunders, C.; Zellman, E.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the results of a second survey carried out by the AERU research unit to map skills demand in the Canterbury ICT sector. This research was commissioned the Electrotechnology Industry Training Organisation (ETITO) Growth Pilot, funded by the Tertiary Education Commission, to develop mechanisms to ensure the timely delivery of an appropriate number of suitably qualified individuals required by enterprises in the Canterbury ICT sector. It builds on a similar survey in 2004.

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  • Leveraging training skills development in SMEs

    Dalziel, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

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  • Sustainable development and cultural capital

    Dalziel, P.; Saunders, C.; Fyfe, R.; Newton, B.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    It has become common for countries to create a framework of sustainable development indicators (SDI) to measure progress in raising the social, economic and environmental well-being of their regional and national communities. Standard practice is to focus on changes in stock measures of physical capital, financial capital, human capital, natural capital and social capital. An unusual feature of New Zealand’s approach is that it pays explicit attention to cultural well-being alongside social, economic and environmental well-being. This practice raises important issues about how measures related to cultural well-being can be incorporated into a national SDI framework. The research for this report explored whether cultural capital is best conceptualised as a component of social capital, or whether it warrants treatment as a separate category. In arguing for the latter the report proposes that cultural capital be defined as a community’s embodied cultural skills and values, in all their community-defined forms, inherited from the community’s previous generation, undergoing adaptation and extension by current members of the community, and desired by the community to be passed on to its next generation.

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  • Sustainable development and equity

    Dalziel, P.; Saunders, C.; Fyfe, R.; Newton, B.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report draws on the New Zealand experience to explore how intra-generational equity might relate to sustainable development in a New Zealand context. After a summary of different approaches to equity found in the international literature, the report considers Article 3 of the Treaty of Waitangi, which imparted to Māori all the rights and privileges of British subjects. The report then discusses how this Article’s widely accepted interpretation as implying that the Crown must equally protect the social rights of all New Zealand citizens, has been applied in the creation of a system of social security to protect New Zealand citizens against poverty and social exclusion. This discussion focuses on the central roles of employment, income support, housing, health and education. This is followed by a survey of a recent debate in New Zealand that focused specifically on pay and employment equity. This approach is adopted as the basis for the proposals towards an equity indicator made in the report. It takes the core elements of New Zealand’s social security – employment; income; housing; health and education – and defines standards for what would be meant by equity for each element. The chapter proposes a statistical series for measuring departures from each standard and then combines these statistics into a proposed equity index. The index is illustrated using New Zealand data in 1996, 2001 and 2006. Data for 2006 record almost no disparity between the male and female populations, but a substantial difference between the European/Pākehā and Māori opulations.

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  • Valuing sport and recreation in New Zealand

    Dalziel, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Sport and recreation are highly valued in New Zealand, indicated by the time and financial resources devoted to sport and recreation activities. This paper reports on a study of the value of sport and recreation, commissioned by Sport and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC). It has produced value-added estimates consistent with New Zealand’s System of National Accounts to suggest that in 2008/09 the contribution of the sector to gross domestic product was between 2.1 and 2.8 per cent (depending on the sector’s definition) and the total value to New Zealanders (including personal benefits from participation) was $12.2 billion.

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  • Integrating employment, skills and economic development: New Zealand

    Dalziel, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The Integrating Employment, Skills and Economic Development (IESED) report to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) follows a study to identify existing co-ordination between labour market policy, skills and vocational training policy and economic development strategies at both regional and national levels. It includes a case study on the Bay of Plenty. The report is comprised of six parts. Part 1 describes the New Zealand government’s policies and programmes in the areas of regional economic development, labour market assistance, and skills and training. Part 2 describes the Bay of Plenty case study. There is an outline of the economic and social context of this region, followed by an introduction to the local agencies that are implementing programmes in regional economic development, labour market assistance, and skills and training. Part 3 analyses the degree of policy integration at the regional level, drawing on interviews of national policymakers and regional actors in the Bay of Plenty. Part 4 draws on the same interviews to identify enabling factors and obstacles to policy integration at the regional level. Part 5 outlines possible future trends, paying particular attention to recent announcements by the Tertiary Education Commission about skills and training policy. The report concludes in Part 6 with some recommendations.

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  • Selwyn District Council

    Cross, T. A.; Dalziel, P.; Saunders, C.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report provides an economic baseline report of the current level of resources in the Selwyn District and how they have changed over recent times. This includes the overall macro economic and policy context; the business sector and employment; population and how this is changing; as well as the natural resources and the infrastructure in the district.

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  • The high-tech sector in Canterbury : a study of its potential and constraints

    Saunders, C.; Dalziel, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This research report was commissioned by New Zealand Trade and Industry to identify and assess factors that would enable high-tech industries in Canterbury to achieve their full potential. The research was comprised of two components. The first involved analysing the direct and indirect contributions of the electronics and software industries in Christchurch, to the Canterbury and the New Zealand economies. The second component involved interviews with senior managers in the Canterbury high-tech sector, including key support agencies, to determine what could help the sector develop to its full potential. Further discussion and recommendations are put forward on possible models for developing the high-tech sector, drawing on the local interviews and some overseas examples.

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  • North Canterbury : an analysis of the current economic base of the region

    Cross, T. A.; Dalziel, P.; Saunders, C.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This Report was commissioned by Enterprise North Canterbury (formally known as North Canterbury Economic Development Trust). It looks at the economic background, area demographics, natural resources of North Canterbury and physical infrastructure of the area. The report concludes with sector analysis including agriculture/horticulture, forestry, wine, tourism, and a detailed breakdown of employment data by sector.

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  • Leveraging training and skills development in SMEs: a regional skills ecosystem case study

    Dalziel, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

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  • Economic policy and cultural well-being: the New Zealand experience

    Dalziel, P.; Maclean, G.; Saunders, C.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    In 2002, the New Zealand government identified three sectors that would be the focus of public policy under its Growth and Innovation Framework. One of these three sectors was the creative industries, selected on the basis that ‘the creative industries can leverage New Zealand’s unique culture and as a knowledge based sector, it has the potential to generate wealth on a sustained basis and reposition New Zealand as a nation of new ideas and new thinking’. Also in 2002, New Zealand reformed its Local Government Act so that one of the two purposes of local government is to promote the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities, in the present and for the future. This paper draws on New Zealand’s experiences under these policies to examine the links between economic policy and cultural well-being, highlighting the underlying principle that the use of cultural capital for economic benefit may damage cultural well-being if the cultural capital is not kept connected to its cultural context.

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  • Consumer attitudes to New Zealand food product attributes and technology use in key international markets

    Saunders, C.; Guenther, M.; Driver, T.; Tait, P.; Dalziel, P.; Rutherford, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The study described in this paper builds on the research above. It is a pilot survey of 100 consumers each in the United Kingdom (UK), India, China, Indonesia, Japan and Korea. The survey gathers information on attitudes and preferences of consumers for attributes in food products in these countries. The first part of the survey assessed the importance of key attributes in food products in these markets. These attributes were selected based on prior research examining international consumer trends (Saunders et al. 2010, Driver et al. 2011, Saunders et al. 2013, Miller et al. 2014). This study expanded previous research by including more countries, by increasing the number of attributes considered, and by assessing important factors underpinning these key attributes in food products. The survey then explores how consumers in these markets were using new personal technologies in relation to food information and purchase intentions. The results from this study 1 are aimed to better inform New Zealand’s export industries, allowing for enhanced value garnered throughout the value chain. A full survey will take place in 2015. This study is also part of a wider research programme “Maximising Export Returns (MER)”, a Ministry of Business, Innovation and Enterprise (MBIE) funded three-year project undertaken by the Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit (AERU) at Lincoln University. This project aims to explore how export firms can capture price premiums by including and communicating credence attributes in products for overseas markets.

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  • Maximising export returns: consumer attitudes towards attributes of food and beverages in export markets relevant to New Zealand

    Guenther, M.; Saunders, C.; Dalziel, P.; Rutherford, P.; Driver, T.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The aim of this study is to explore consumer preferences towards selected key attributes in food, beverage, and other products in China, India, Indonesia, Japan and the United Kingdom (UK). The targeted consumer groups are the middle and upper class consumers in each country who are expected to be more likely to be willing to pay premium for these attributes in food and beverages, hence informing the New Zealand industries of possible opportunities for maximising their export returns. This study is part of a wider research project ‘Maximising Export Returns (MER)’, a three year project undertaken by the Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit (AERU) at Lincoln University funded by the New Zealand Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). This project aims to explore how export firms can obtain price premiums by considering credence attributes in their products for overseas markets. This research builds on previous work of the AERU which showed that overseas consumers (including those in the UK, China, and India) value different attributes in food products (Saunders et al. 2013). The study assessed consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) and preferences for the certification of certain attributes in lamb and dairy products; results showed that food safety was the most important attribute. Not surprisingly, India and China rated food safety certification as more important than respondents from the UK. However, more surprisingly, in most cases Indian and Chinese consumers valued other credence attributes more than consumers in the UK, including organic, environmental quality, animal welfare and recyclability (Saunders et al. 2013). In a pilot study, further surveying expanded the research to firstly include more countries such as Indonesia, Japan and Korea and secondly to assess in more detail the importance of factors affecting key credence attributes in food products and the relationships between them. The pilot survey explored consumer attitudes towards seven attributes in food products and then selected four of them for more detailed analysis; these were animal welfare, environmental quality, health food and food safety. Survey participants were asked to rate the importance of a range of factors underpinning these four attributes, which suggested some associations between them. Environmental quality, for example, was listed in the three developing countries as one of the top five factors associated with food safety (Saunders et al. 2015). The information gained from the pilot survey assisted the development of the scope of this study. In this study, the selection of credence attributes is expanded to ten key attributes in food and beverages that are important to consumers in five New Zealand exports markets, then six of these attributes are selected to assess underpinning factors in more detail as the pilot study showed that the factors influencing these key credence attributes differed across markets. The six key attributes are food safety, environmental condition, animal welfare & health, human health enhancing foods, social responsibility and the role of traditional cultures. The method of this study included a structured and self-administered online survey. Primary data was collected using Qualtrics™, a web-based survey system. Five surveys were conducted in March/April 2015 to assess consumers’ attitudes towards attributes in food and beverage products. The surveys were distributed in two developed countries (Japan and the UK) and three developing countries (China, India and Indonesia) and had a sample size of 1,000 consumers in each country. The survey also included a choice experiment to assess consumers’ willingness –to – pay (WTP) for attributes in different types of food and beverages, however these results are not in the focus of this report. Additionally, the WTP results will be used to estimate the potential benefits to New Zealand through modelling different scenarios using the Lincoln Trade and Environment model LTEM; a partial equilibrium trade model which forecasts the international trade, production and consumption of agricultural commodities.

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  • Forecast of skills demand in the high tech sector in Canterbury

    Dalziel, P.; Saunders, C.; Taylor, G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the results of a survey carried out by the AERU research unit to map skills demand in the Canterbury ICT sector. This completes the first stream of the Electrotechnology Industry Training Organisation (ETITO) Growth Pilot funded by the Tertiary Education Commission to develop a model and mechanisms to ensure the timely delivery of an appropriate number of suitably qualified individuals across the range of competence required by enterprises in the Canterbury ICT sector.

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  • The Land and the Brand

    Saunders, C.; Dalziel, P.; Guenther, M.; Saunders, J.; Rutherford, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit at Lincoln University was commissioned to prepare this report assessing the contributions that the agri‐food sector has made to the wellbeing of New Zealanders over the decades and in the present day. The purpose of this research is to indicate how industry‐led initiatives and private‐public partnerships might build on the sector’s historical successes for ongoing economic prosperity into the future. The agri‐food sector continues to dominate the country’s merchandise exports. The dairy sector in 2013/14 generated export revenue of just over $18 billion, followed by meat and wool (more than $8 billion), forestry (more than $5.1 billion), horticulture (nearly $3.8 billion) and seafood (more than $1.7 billion).

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  • Maximising export returns: the use of digital media and smart technology in shopping and information gathering for food and beverages in markets relevant to New Zealand

    Driver, T.; Saunders, C.; Guenther, M.; Dalziel, P.; Rutherford, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The aim of this study is to inform New Zealand businesses of possible opportunities for increasing their export returns by improving their market access through digital media and smart technologies. This study explores the use of digital media and smart technologies by middle and upper class consumers of food and beverage products in China, India, Indonesia and compares this with consumers in Japan and the United Kingdom (UK). This study is part of a wider research project ‘Maximising Export Returns (MER)’, a three year project undertaken by the Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit (AERU) at Lincoln University funded by the New Zealand Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). This project aims to explore how export firms can obtain price premiums from the credence attributes of their products and place these in overseas markets. The new technologies include online shopping (e-commerce), social media and mobile devices (such as smartphones and tablets). The use of such technologies has increased internationally, with growing broadband internet use, online shopping, mobile social media and mobile device use (e.g. smartphone use). These technologies provide mechanisms for the effective marketing and sales of New Zealand food and beverage products overseas.

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  • Regional skill ecosystems to assist young people making education employment linkages in transition from school to work

    Dalziel, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    For the last five years the author has been involved in a five-year trans-disciplinary research program funded by the New Zealand government on education employment linkages for young people. His research has focused on employer-led channels at the regional level, investigating how opportunities and requirements of employers in a region are communicated to young people as they make key education choices. This paper summarises the major findings of this part of the research programme, paying particular attention to the role of careers offices in post-school education institutions. The work draws on the skill ecosystem metaphor introduced initially by David Finegold (1999) and developed more recently by the NSW Board of Vocational Education and Training in Australia in collaboration with a research team led by John Buchanan at the University of Sydney

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  • Market-oriented skills development in SMEs: the skills ecosystem in Canterbury, New Zealand

    Dalziel, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    New Zealand public policy aims to increase skill levels in the labour force, taking into account that businesses are predominantly small and medium-sized enterprises, or SMEs; two-thirds of New Zealand enterprises have zero employees, and almost two thirds of businesses that do employ staff have no more than five employees. There is considerable evidence that small and medium-sized enterprises generally face significant barriers to engagement with formal training programmes. Consequently, the LEED programme of the OECD initiated a project to identify ways of overcoming barriers to workforce development in SMEs. New Zealand participated in that project, submitting a case study on the Canterbury region. This paper explains the study’s conceptual framework and presents the major research results. It finishes with an analysis of differences in the data between highly innovative and less innovative SMEs. The large differences between the high and low innovation firms were in their participation in: marketing and promotion training; business planning training; research and development training; and job-specific technical skills (formal training). This suggests the innovative firms may be more driven by the search for new market opportunities.

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  • Education employment linkages: perspectives from employer-led channels

    Dalziel, P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report presents results from a series of key informant interviews carried out in 2009 about employer-led channels for helping young New Zealanders make effective educationemployment linkages during their transition years. Employers have become more connected to education institutions, motivated in part by serious skills shortages that emerged over the last decade. Career Services is recognised as a superb source of reliable career information, advice and guidance, whose services could be more widely used. The interviews revealed a concern that large numbers of young New Zealanders undervalue the positive benefits that can be achieved with good quality career guidance. There was wide support for further development of careers education in secondary and in tertiary education institutions. Another theme concerned finding ways to better manage relationships between educators and employers, including the greater use of specialist brokers. Finally, participants emphasised again and again the importance of supporting effective systems for helping young people to imagine different possibilities for their career development, and for helping them to develop skills for exploring and assessing a full range of opportunities as they construct their own career pathways.

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