72 results for Fairweather, J. R., Book

  • Evolving role of local government in promoting sustainable tourism development on the West Coast

    Cameron, A. M.; Memon, A.; Simmons, D. G.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The objective of this study is to examine the perspectives West Coast tourism stakeholders hold about the local government's emerging roles and responsibilities for tourism planning in the region. Local government authorities examined include the Buller, Grey and Westland District Councils, the West Coast Regional Council and Tourism West Coast, (the Regional Tourism Organisation, which forms the promotional 'arm' of the three District Councils). 'Tourism stakeholders' includes tourism-related businesses and NGOs as well as local government staff.

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  • The Q method and subjective perceptions of food in the 1990s

    Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Results of a study of people's perception of food are presented in this report. The Q method was used to factor analyse the data from 59 subjects who sorted statements about food. Four types are described and labelled the Gregarious Gourmet, the Virtuous Vegetarian, the Tradition Meat Eater and the Selective Connoisseur. These types account for the main variations in perception of food and each type has a distinctive subjective experience of food. The results have implications for marketing, dietary and nutrition practitioners, and for the sociology of food and eating.

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  • Tourism in Westland : challenges for planning and recommendations for management

    Simmons, D. G.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report provides a synthesis of nine separate reports on key aspects of tourism in Westland, and makes recommendations for the future management of the sector.

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  • New Zealanders and biotechnology : reactions to novel developments in medicine, farming and food

    Cook, A. J.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The aim of this research was to predict and understand public reactions to biotechnology, and in particular to estimate recent change over time in acceptability of examples of biotechnology. A further objective was to assess public reactions to realisable future developments in biotechnology. These developments were: using nanoparticles in gene replacement therapy, bio-pharming and using nanoparticles in the production of lamb or beef.

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  • Visitors’ and locals’ views of environmental management in Christchurch, New Zealand

    Fairweather, J. R.; Maslin, C.; Swaffield, S. R.; Simmons, D. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The objective of the research presented in this report was to develop an understanding of visitors' and locals' views of environmental management in Christchurch. A total of 63 people were selected in a diverse, non-random sample with roughly equal proportions of men and women, and including 21 overseas visitors, 33 domestic visitors and 22 local people. Each subject sorted a pre selected set of structured photographs into nine piles, ranging from those that represented good environmental management to those that represented poor environmental management, to create their own Q sort. All Q sorts were factor analysed to identify three factors or views on environmental management. Subjects' attitudes, beliefs and expectations in making their selections were recorded in interviews and provide an additional basis for interpreting the three different factors. The themes distinctive to the factors, and the themes that are common to the factors, are discussed to develop some theoretical implications. Finally, a number of implications for policy are considered, in particular the need to retain a breadth of approaches to environmental management.

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  • The values associated with Maori-centred tourism in Canterbury

    Zygadlo, F. K.; McIntosh, A. J.; Matunga, H. P.; Fairweather, J. R.; Simmons, D. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The overall aim of this study was to analyse Maori tourism development in the Canterbury region according to values of Maori-centred tourism. The objectives to achieve this aim were to validate the relevance of the values of Maori-centred tourism to Maori tourism business practices in Canterbury and to identify the strategies for achieving Maori-centred tourism business ethics in Canterbury. A Kaupapa Maori research approach was used to achieve the objectives. This approach was seen appropriate given the need for a culturally relevant perspective. This included employing Maori values derived from a Maori epistemology as measures to analyse Maori tourism development.

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  • Nanotechnology : ethical and social issues : results from a New Zealand survey

    Cook, A. J.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The general aim of this research was to determine and understand New Zealand public reactions to nanotechnology. An objective was to assess the generalisability of focus group research in a national survey. A further objective was to investigate the role of values, beliefs and emotion in shaping attitudes towards nanotechnology.

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  • Public drinking and social organisation in Methven and Mt. Somers

    Fairweather, J. R.; Campbell, H.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The results from an ethnographic study of two South Island rural towns, Methven and Mt. Somers, are presented in this report along with a selected review of the literature on pubs. An argument is developed that integrated ethnography is necessary to fully understand public drinking, and that practice theory is appropriate for integrating interactions with such factors as gender and occupation. We conclude that the findings from the ethnography can be best explained in terms of status, exclusion, and control over both work and identity. The findings are similar to those from overseas studies suggesting that the interactions found in Methven and Mt. Somers occur in a similar form in other rural locations.

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  • Investigating community : imperatives for but constraints against land use change in the Mackenzie / Waitaki Basin

    Morris, C.; Fairweather, J. R.; Swaffield, S. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report uses an ethnographic approach to provide a description and analysis of the social context of land use change in the Mackenzie/Waitaki Basin. In order to understand current land use dynamics it begins by reviewing the history of land use change, identifying land user groups, and describing the environmental and political factors that influence land use. The report then accounts for landholders' attitudes to farming and current trends in intensification and diversification, using first-hand quotations to illustrate points of view. The main findings are centred on land use dynamics, showing how these are based on specific landholder values and regional distinctions. Further, landholders perceive that they are in conflict with a number of groups but notably bureaucracy and government, and environmentalists. The use of the words 'community' and 'sustainability' among landholders in the Basin is examined. The report concludes by considering the policy implications of the findings, especially those policy issues that rest upon the questionable premise that there is, or can be, a consensus implied by the term 'community'.

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  • Smallholders in Canterbury : characteristics, motivations, land use and intentions to move

    Fairweather, J. R.; Robertson, N. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The AERU published its first report on smallholdings in Canterbury in 1993. The present report extends that research by using a random sample survey and thereby updates our understanding of this very important phenomenon. The report covers basic descriptive information, land use, general attitudes and motivation. It also compares lifestylers with farming-oriented smallholders. Results will be of interest to people involved directly in smallholding by showing them what people are doing on their land. The report will also be of interest to policy makers responding to the planning implications of the effects of the growing number of smallholdings.

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  • Causal mapping of ARGOS high country farms and comparisons to sheep/beef and dairy farms

    Fairweather, J. R.; Hunt, L. M.; Lucock, D.; Rosin, C.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The Agriculture Research Group On Sustainability (ARGOS) is investigating the social, environmental and economic consequences of different management systems in different farming sectors in New Zealand (for more information visit www.argos.org.nz). The sectors being studied include kiwifruit, sheep/beef and dairy, and the systems being studied include conventional, integrated and organic management. Twelve farms under each system are being studied. As part of the ARGOS social objective, causal mapping was used to document how the participating dairy farmers described and explained the factors involved in their farming systems, broadly defined to include economic, social and environmental factors. Participants identified which factors in the 41 provided were important to the management and performance of their farms and linked these together in the form of a map.

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  • New Zealand agricultural policy reform and impacts on the farm sector : detailed historical analysis addressing the issue of the specificity of the farm sector

    Jean, N.; Fairweather, J. R.; Gouin, D. M.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This research analyses the effects on the farm sector of the reform of New Zealand agricultural policy undertaken in 1985. This analysis is placed within a discussion of the larger issue of the specificity of the farm sector and whether this specificity requires special support from the state in most of the developed countries. This study describes the crisis of the New Zealand economy at the beginning of the deregulation process and explains why the farm sector was at the centre of the reform. The removal of state support to agriculture and the transition measures set in place are documented. The research also analyses the effects of the reform on farms both at the structural level and in terms of farm incomes. The sheep and the dairy sectors are analysed in detail. The analysis concludes that the farm sector has maintained its level of economic activity despite important reductions in state support. Finally, this study discusses some lessons that can be obtained from the New Zealand experience, notably in relation with the specificity of the farm sector.

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  • Sketch maps: features and issues important for the management of ARGOS orchards and farms

    Read, M.; Hunt, L. M.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The primary objective of this research was to analyse sketch maps completed by ARGOS kiwifruit orchardists and sheep/beef farmers to find out what was important to their management of their properties, and compare production systems and sectors. The analysis was exploratory with no firm ideas about what the maps might show. The purpose of the sketch maps in the interview was to provide an avenue for orchardists and farmers to tell us by drawing a sketch map of their property, about what they saw as important to their management of that property, as an introduction and a supplement to the remainder of the interview.

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  • Visitors to Rotorua : characteristics, activities and decision-making

    Moore, K.; Fairweather, J. R.; Simmons, D. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report presents results from two surveys of visitors to Rotorua, New Zealand, which investigated visitors' general characteristics (e.g., age, gender, origin country, accommodation, group type and size, length of stay, etc.) and their decision-making processes (when decisions were made and itineraries planned, what influenced those decisions and purpose of travel).

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  • Tourism, water and waste in Westland : implications of increasing demand on infrastructure

    Cullen, R.; Dakers, A.; Fairweather, J. R.; Simmons, D. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The growth of tourism, and its consequent benefits, are dependent on the maintenance, if not enhancement, of the West Coast's unique natural environment. Parts of this natural environment have been described as ecologically fragile. There are a range of tourist activities that consume water and produce solid waste and wastewater. An important issue is the tourists' additional demand for potable water and their production of additional wastewater. The major objectives of this research were to: develop models to estimate and project aggregated tourist water use and wastewater production at Hokitika, Harihari, Franz Josef, and Haast; and assess the adequacy and resourcing of the facilities to provide water, manage wastewater and solid wastes associated with tourism.

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  • Change in New Zealand farmer and grower attitudes towards gene technology : results from a follow up survey

    Cook, A. J.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This study examined changes in the intentions, attitudes and beliefs of farmers regarding their use of gene technology. Of 656 respondents to a postal survey in 2000, the views of 115 were assessed again in 2002. These follow up respondents indicated their intention to use gene technology, attitudes toward using gene technology and beliefs about market acceptance, commercial viability and environmental risk from using the technology.

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  • Understanding why farmers change their farming practices : the role of orienting principles in technology transfer

    Morris, C.; Loveridge, A.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report presents results from a qualitative study of sheep, beef and dairy farmers in the Temuka, Geraldine area of the South Island, New Zealand. Farmers' accounts of their farming practices, and how they decide to adopt, or not adopt, innovations are analysed to highlight the key orienting principles that guide their decision making. Farmers in each type of production have different orientations to innovation, in large part reflecting the nature of the industry in which they are located. Sheep and beef farmers emphasise profitability and the need to control risk and to farm safely. Dairy farmers emphasise increasing production, increasing efficiency and control by monitoring production. The results are important for alerting researchers and educationalists to the farmers' point of view in the development of effective extension.

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  • Smallholding in the Selwyn District

    Cook, A. J.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Although the economic benefits to the primary sector of biotechnology are recognised, they have not to date been measured. This report begins to fill this gap in our understanding by estimating the economic contribution of biotechnology to the primary sector in New Zealand. The research focused on commercialised applications of four biotechnologies across the whole primary sector. Data were collected through surveying key informants about the production impacts of the technology, the available alternatives to biotechnological innovations, and the rates at which innovations had been adopted by primary producers.

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  • Nanotechnology : ethical and social issues : results from New Zealand focus groups

    Cook, A. J.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

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  • Evolving community response to tourism and change in Rotorua

    Horn, C.; Simmons, D. G.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The aim of this report is to outline how the Rotorua community experiences tourism and tourism development and how they have adapted to it. The objectives are to: give an historical account of the history of the development of tourism in Rotorua; give an account of broader community issues which influence the community's attitudes to tourism development in their town; record the perceptions that residents have of tourism and show how these have changed over time; describe how the host community copes with the type of tourism development that exists in the area; and suggest what factors might be important in influencing residents' perceptions of tourism and their adaptation to it. This report argues that the community in Rotorua is generally very accepting of tourism, and that tourism in the town is well managed due to the proactive role taken by the local Council in relation to tourism development and promotion. Local people see tourism as a source of stability at a time of great change. For local decision-makers, tourism is a means to address the problems of unemployment and poverty which appear to be increasing in the area.

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