10 results for Gregory, Nuala, Creative work

  • Exploded View

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In Gallery Two, Associate Professor Nuala Gregory from the Elam School of Fine Arts creates an immersive installation of printed and collaged works. Her art work draws on her investigations in art theory, advancing the proposition that art can produce effects which escape the bounds of representation and operated instead at the level of bodily sensation. The exhibition is accompanied by a 48 page full colour catalogue with essays by Dr Peter Shand and Gregory O’Brien.

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  • Nuala Gregory - new works

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Now Colour, Now Shape, Now Paper

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Coleccion Grafica

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Light, Water, Pigment - an active accord

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Exhibition of 9 paintings for the Second International Conference on Semiconductor Photochemistry. The exhibition was based on common materials used in photochemistry and watercolour painting, water, pigment and light.

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  • Exploded View

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In Gallery Two, Associate Professor Nuala Gregory from the Elam School of Fine Arts creates an immersive installation of printed and collaged works. Her art work draws on her investigations in art theory, advancing the proposition that art can produce effects which escape the bounds of representation and operated instead at the level of bodily sensation. The exhibition is accompanied by a 48 page full colour catalogue with essays by Dr Peter Shand and Gregory O’Brien.

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  • Rare Form

    Pritchard, E; Mullins, K; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curators, artist Rare Form brings together a group of artists who work in sculpture, paint, print and assemblage, all of whom pull apart the method and order of art-making. Some works are comprised of many parts while others record a series of actions, and the means of generation or construction is often evident in the finished works. The object, the illusion, the form and the frame are subverted, giving the works a sense of playful intoxication; both the artists and their creations are in rare form.

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  • THE IMAGE AS NOT a celebration of ambiguity and negation

    Baatz, U; Crone, D; Donnelly, M; Dowling, J; Gregory, Nuala; Heron, W; Hill, T; Hooghiemstra, T; Schneider, J

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curator ‘THE IMAGE AS NOT’, is a show dedicated to a celebration of ambiguity and negation, and features the following artists: Uta Baatz, David Crone, Mickey Donnelly, John Dowling, Nuala Gregory, Willie Heron, Tony Hill, Tjibbe Hooghiemstra, Jurgen Schneider.

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  • Assemblages

    Mackel, D; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mackel, D., collaborator Over the past three years both artists have worked collaboratively in an installation format under the broad theme of landscapes of the past. For this exhibition, Deirdre Mackel has produced an installation entitled ‘Accidental Gardens 2’. It consists of a child-like garden made from an enclosure of miniature barbed wire fences, and toy gardening tools, including elements of Nuala Gregory’s flower works and small sculptures or ‘shelves’, assembled together allowing for the combination and interplay of ideas and materials derived from two locations. Deirdre references her remembered landscapes of growing up in West Belfast throughout the conflict and Nuala responds with objects representing those commonly found in the earth - old bottles delicately embellished with buttercups and daisies, combining them with lemon wood blocks to reference her current landscape of New Zealand. This assemblage of objects, symbolises the way things are thrown together in chaotic metropolitan space, forming accidental relations among which new possibilities might yet be glimpsed.

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  • Dinnseanchas - From New Delhi to the Fountain of the Clouded Sky

    Gregory, NA; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This three-person exhibition was curated by Nuala Gregory (and included her own collages that were collaborations with artists Sarah Treadwell, John Pusateri and Mandy Bonnell). The other two invited artists were Diane Henshaw and Deirdre Mackel. The exhibition consisted of a series of artworks of varying scale, in mixed media on paper, including lithography, gouache paintings, charcoal drawings, and all with elements of collage. The works were arranged to form a themed installation featuring new bodies of work produced in response to the theme of dinnseanchas or ‘poetry of place’. Drawing upon their experiences of very different environments (Auckland, Mayo, Belfast), the artists sought to define a set of relations to place that goes beyond the familiar and the functional. Instead, they attempted to recover a poetic or imagistic way of navigating public and private space, in a co-creation of the lived environment that has roots deep in ancient Irish culture. A modern Irish-English dictionary translates the word dinnseanchas as ‘topography’ (the science of place), but its etymology is quite revealing. The term originally referred to an ancient genre of mythological geography that gave a poetic account of place names. Dinn means place (an eminent site or locale); sean means old, and is strongly associated with the figure of the seanchaí or local storyteller, the keeper of lore and memory; and cas means to twist, as in the twisting of an ankle, but also of a rope. Poetically, the word suggests the twisting together of strands of collective memory of place. Perhaps forming a single narrative core, or (in a more visual idiom) a tapestry weaving together place and people, memory and experience, history and present desire. This tradition, this mnemonic and cognitive practice, was gradually extinguished in Ireland along with the native language, but has been ‘reclaimed’ in recent years particularly by the work of poets such as Seamus Heaney, Paul Muldoon and Ciaran Carson. In this exhibition, the artists have expressed the spirit of dinnseanchas in a modern idiom, as a ‘cognitive-imaginative mapping’ of the environment through forms of artistic engagement. Not so much by naming or storytelling, or acts of linguistic commemoration, but by marking and investing, revealing or creating new ways of seeing the landscape or cityscape – ways that can help overcome our habitual blindness, born of the pressures of time and work and commercial imperatives.

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