78 results for Hamilton, David P., Journal article

  • Lake restoration: Does sediment capping have post-application effects on zooplankton and phytoplankton?

    Özkundakci, Deniz; Duggan, Ian C.; Hamilton, David P. (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Although in situ sediment capping is frequently used to reduce internal loading of contaminants and nutrients, post-application assessment rarely includes the potential undesirable short-term effects on plankton species composition. We hypothesised that a modified zeolite (Z2G1) application as a sediment capping agent in Lake Okaro, New Zealand, could cause significant undesirable shifts in species composition of both zooplankton and phytoplankton due to burial of resting stages or interference with feeding for the zooplankton. Alternatively, we predicted that the capping agent might have no effect due to, for example, the coarse grain size of the material (1–3 mm). We used multidimensional scaling (MDS) and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) to identify any adverse effects of Z2G1 on zooplankton and phytoplankton species composition (i.e. shifts in community structure, including species loss) by comparing the community structure before and after the Z2G1 application. We found no significant differences in species composition before and after the Z2G1 application at the depths investigated (surface and 9 m). However, all of the analyses showed statistically significant differences among seasons, indicating seasonal variations in plankton composition far outweigh those that may have resulted from the Z2G1 application. Coarse particle size, low dose rate and a restricted area where the sediment capping agent was applied were considered to be the factors limiting potential adverse effects on plankton species. Considerations of finer-grained material to increase coverage and efficacy of phosphorus adsorption require assessment for their effects on zooplankton, however, and a direct mode of application into the hypolimnion is recommended to minimise effects on zooplankton and phytoplankton communities.

    View record details
  • Natural and anthropogenic lead in sediments of the Rotorua lakes, New Zealand

    Pearson, Lisa Kyle; Hendy, Chris H.; Hamilton, David P.; Pickett, Rachel Cara (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Global atmospheric sources of lead have increased more than 100-fold over the past century as a result of deforestation, coal combustion, ore smelting and leaded petroleum. Lead compounds generally accumulate in depositional areas across the globe where, due to low solubility and relative freedom from microbial degradation, the history of their inputs is preserved. In lakes there is rapid deposition and often little bioturbation of lead, resulting in an excellent depositional history of changes in both natural and anthropogenic sources. The objective of this study was to use sediments from a regionally bounded set of lakes to provide an indication of the rates of environmental inputs of lead whilst taking into account differences of trophic state and lead exposure between lakes. Intact sediment gravity cores were collected from 13 Rotorua lakes in North Island of New Zealand between March 2006 and January 2007. Cores penetrated sediments to a depth of 16–30 cm and contained volcanic tephra from the 1886 AD Tarawera eruption. The upper depth of the Tarawera tephra enabled prescription of a date for the associated depth in the core (120 years). Each core showed a sub-surface peak in lead concentration above the Tarawera tephra which was contemporaneous with the peak use of lead alkyl as a petroleum additive in New Zealand. An 8 m piston core was taken in the largest of the lakes, Lake Rotorua, in March 2007. The lake is antipodal to the pre-industrial sources of atmospheric lead but still shows increasing lead concentrations from <2 up to 3.5 μg g−1 between the Whakatane eruption (5530 ± 60 cal. yr BP) and the Tarawera eruption. Peaks in lead concentration in Lake Rotorua are associated with volcanic tephras, but are small compared with those arising from recent anthropogenic-derived lead deposition. Our results show that diagenetic processes associated with iron, manganese and sulfate oxidation-reduction, and sulfide precipitation, act to smooth distributions of lead from anthropogenic sources in the lake sediments. The extent of this smoothing can be related to changes in sulfate availability and reduction in sulfide driven by differences in trophic status amongst the lakes. Greatest lead mobilisation occurs in mesotrophic lakes during seasonal anoxia as iron and manganese are released to the porewater, allowing upward migration of lead towards the sediment–water interface. This lead mobilisation can only occur if sulfides are not present. The sub-surface peak in lead concentrations in lake sediments ascribed to lead alkyl in petroleum persists despite the diagenetic processes acting to disperse lead within the sediments and into the overlying water.

    View record details
  • Predicting the effects of climate change on trophic status of three morphologically varying lakes: Implications for lake restoration and management

    Trolle, Dennis; Hamilton, David P.; Pilditch, Conrad A.; Duggan, Ian C.; Jeppesen, Erik (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    To quantify the effects of a future climate on three morphologically different lakes that varied in trophic status from oligo-mesotrophic to highly eutrophic, we applied the one-dimensional lake ecosystem model DYRESM-CAEDYM to oligo-mesotrophic Lake Okareka, eutrophic Lake Rotoehu, both in the temperate Bay of Plenty region, and highly eutrophic Lake Ellesmere, in the temperate Canterbury region, New Zealand. All three models were calibrated for a three-year period and validated for a separate two-year period. The model simulations generally showed good agreement with observed data for water column temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN) and chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations. To represent a possible future climate at the end of this century, mean annual changes in air temperature by 2100, derived from the IPCC A2 scenario downscaled for these lake regions, were added to the daily baseline temperatures for years 2002–2007. Lake model simulations using this future climate scenario indicate differential increases in eutrophication in all three lakes, especially during summer months. The predicted effects on annual mean surface water concentrations of TP, TN and Chl a will be equivalent to the effects of increasing external TN and TP loading by 25–50%. Simulations for the polymictic, eutrophic Lake Rotoehu further indicate that cyanophytes will be more abundant in the future climate, increasing by >15% in their contribution to annual mean Chl a. Therefore, future climate effects should be taken into account in the long-term planning and implementation of lake management as strategies may need to be refined and adapted to preserve or improve the present-day lake water quality.

    View record details
  • Low-dose alum application trialled as a management tool for internal nutrient loads in Lake Okaro, New Zealand

    Paul, Wendy J.; Hamilton, David P.; Gibbs, Max M. (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Aluminium sulfate (alum) was applied to Lake Okaro, a eutrophic New Zealand lake with recurrent cyanobacterial blooms, to evaluate its suitability for reducing trophic status and bloom frequency. The dose yielded 0.6 g aluminium m–3 in the epilimnion. Before dosing, pH exceeded 8 in epilimnetic waters but was optimal for flocculation (6–8) below 4 m depth. After dosing, there was no significant change in water clarity, hypolimnetic pH decreased to 5.5, and soluble aluminium exceeded recommended guidelines for protection of freshwater organisms. Epilimnetic phosphate concentrations decreased from 40 to 5 mg m–3 and total nitrogen (TN):total phosphorus (TP) mass ratios increased from 7:1 to 37:1. The dominant phytoplankton species changed from Anabaena spp. before dosing, to Ceratium hirudinella , then Staurastrum sp. after dosing. Detection of effectiveness of dosing may have been limited by sampling duration and design, as well as the low alum dose. The decrease in hypolimnetic pH and epilimnetic TP, and increase in Al3+ and chlorophyll a, are attributed to the low alkalinity lake water and coincidence of alum dosing with a cyanobacterial bloom and high pH.

    View record details
  • Historical and contemporary perspectives on the sediments of Lake Rotorua

    Hamilton, David P.; Pearson, Lisa Kyle; Hendy, Chris H.; Burger, David F.; McCarthy, Mark; Healy, Terry R. (2007-07)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotorua is probably the oldest continuously inundated lake in New Zealand, occupying a caldera formed by or closely associated with the eruption of the Mamaku ignimbrite and the collapse of the Rotorua caldera (Healy, 1975; Lowe and Green, 1991). The lake has undergone drastic changes in size and depth as a result of tectonics, volcanic activity and erosion. Since the Rotoehu eruption, (~60 kyr), the lake level has fluctuated between 120 m above present (280 m asl) and 10 m below present level. The modern lake covers an area of 79 km2 and has a mean depth of 10 m. Despite its long history of sedimentation, Lake Rotorua has an irregular bathymetry with features including faulted blocks, slumps, hydrothermal explosion craters, springs and large methane discharge pock marks.

    View record details
  • Estimation of total cloud cover from solar radiation observations at Lake Rotorua, New Zealand

    Luo, Liancong; Hamilton, David P.; Han, Boping (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The DYRESM-CAEDYM model is a valuable tool for simulating water temperature for biochemical studies in aquatic ecosystem. The model requires inputs of surface short-wave radiation and long-wave radiation or total cloud cover fraction (TC). Long-wave radiation is often not measured directly so a method to determine TC from commonly measured short-wave solar irradiance (E0) and theoretical short-wave solar irradiance under a clear sky (Ec) has broad application. A more than 17-year (15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009) hourly solar irradiance data set was used to estimate the peak solar irradiance for each ordinal date over one year, which was assumed to be representative of solar irradiance in the absence of cloud. Comparison between these daily observed values and the modelled clear-sky solar radiation over one year was in close agreement (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.995 and root mean squared error, RMSE = 12.54W m-²). The downloaded hourly cloudiness measurements from 15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009 was used to calculate the daily values for this period and then the calculated daily values over the 17 years were used to calculate the average values for each ordinal date over one year. A regression equation between (1 - E0/Ec) and TC produced a correlation coefficient value of 0.99 (p > 0.01, n = 71). The validation of this cloud cover estimation model was conducted with observed short-wave solar radiation and TC at two sites. Values of TC derived from the model at the Lake Rotorua site gave a reasonable prediction of the observed values (RMSE = 0.10, r = 0.86, p > 0.01, n = 61). The model was also tested at Queenstown (South Island of New Zealand) and it provided satisfactory results compared to the measurements (RMSE = 0.16, r = 0.67, p > 0.01, n = 61). Therefore the model’s good performance and broad applicability will contribute to the DYRESM-CAEDYM accuracy of water temperature simulation when long-wave radiation is not available.

    View record details
  • Reducing the external environmental costs of pastoral farming in New Zealand: experiences from the Te Arawa lakes, Rotorua

    Abell, Jonathan Michael; Hamilton, David P.; Paterson, John (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Decades of nutrient pollution have caused water quality to decline in the nationally iconic Te Arawa (Rotorua) lakes in New Zealand. Pastoral agriculture is a major nutrient source, and therefore this degradation represents an external environmental cost to intensive farming. This cost is borne by the wider community, and a major publically funded remediation programme is now under way. This article describes the range of actions being taken to reduce nutrient loads from internal (lake bed sediments) and external (primarily diffuse) sources in the lake catchments. The high economic cost and uncertain efficacy of engineering-based actions to reduce internal nutrient loads is highlighted. Major changes to land management practices to control diffuse nutrient pollution are required throughout New Zealand if the need for costly and lengthy remediation programmes elsewhere is to be avoided. More action to educate farmers and the public about eutrophication issues, development and enforcement of environmental standards, and further consideration of the use of market-based instruments are proposed as ways to correct the current market failure.

    View record details
  • Effect of boron-doped goethite on soil acidity, different forms of manganese in red soil and the growth of rape (brassica napus l.) seedlings

    Cui, Jingzhen; Zhu, Duanwei; Liao, Shuijiao; Liu, Guanglong; Ren, Liying; Zhou, Wenbing; Hamilton, David P. (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Rape (Brassica napus L.) seedling pot experiments were performed with a red soil treated with goethite which had boron (B) either adsorbed (ad-B-goethite) or occluded (oc-B-goethite). Soil acidity, different forms of manganese in the soils and different elements content of the rape seedlings were determined. It was found that the addition of boron-containing goethite to the soils resulted in increased rape growth, elevated soil pH and decreased exchangeable acidity. Compared with the control, boron-containing goethite elevated the content of exchangeable manganese (Mn) (EXC-Mn), organic matter bound Mn (OM-Mn), reducible oxide Mn (RO-Mn) and residual Mn (RES-Mn) which were difficult to use for plant. Low labile organic matter was significantly correlated with easily reducible oxide Mn (ERO-Mn) (P < 0.01) and RO-Mn (P < 0.05). Middle organic matter and soil pH was significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with RES-Mn. Stepwise regression was used to select the combination of variables that best estimates shoot and root dry weight of rape seedling. Among them, soil pH, EXC-Mn, OM-Mn, RO-Mn and RES-Mn significantly influenced the dry weight of rape seedlings. The addition of boron-containing goethite improved the uptake of iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and copper (Cu) element and decreased the uptake of Mn and zinc (Zn) element in rape seedling. The results suggested that boron-containing goethite could provide a better soil acidity environment for plant growth; it was also an important agent increasing a part of manganese difficult to use for plant and reducing the activity of soil manganese, which was beneficial to altering rape seedling growth.

    View record details
  • Catchment land use and trophic state impacts on phytoplankton composition: a case study from the Rotorua lakes’ district, New Zealand

    Paul, Wendy J.; Hamilton, David P.; Ostrovsky, Ilia; Miller, Steven D.; Zhang, Austin; Muraoka, Kohji (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Trophic state of lakes has been related to catchment land use, but direct links between phytoplankton taxa and land use are limited. Phytoplankton composition, represented by relative cell abundance of phyla, was measured over a period of 4 years in 11 lakes in the Rotorua region, New Zealand. The lakes differed in morphometry, trophic state and land use (as percentage catchment area). We tested whether relative proportion of land uses, indirectly representing relative nutrient loading, was the overarching driver of phytoplankton composition. Trophic state was correlated negatively with native forest and positively with pasture and urban area. Cyanoprokaryota were correlated negatively with native forest and positively with pasture and trophic state, Chlorophyta were correlated positively with native forest and urban land use and negatively with pasture and trophic state, and Bacillariophyta were positively correlated with dissolved reactive silica to dissolved inorganic nitrogen (Si:DIN) and Si to dissolved reactive phosphorus (Si:DRP) ratios. Lakes with higher nutrient loads had higher trophic state and Cyanoprokaryota dominance. Chlorophyta were negatively correlated with Cyanoprokaryota and Bacillariophyta, suggesting competition amongst these groups. Our results apply to lakes potentially subject to changes in catchment land use, which may have implications for trophic state, phytoplankton composition and Cyanoprokaryota blooms.

    View record details
  • Growth and turion formation of Potamogeton crispus in response to different phosphorus concentrations in water

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Tewu; Zhu, Duanwei; Hamilton, David P.; Nie, Zhongnan; Liu, Liangqing; Wan, Xiaoqiong; Zhu, Congming (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The vegetative growth and turion formation of Potamogeton crispus, a submersed aquatic macrophyte, was investigated under a range of phosphorus (P) concentrations (0. 025, 0. 25, 2. 5 and 25 mg P L⁻¹) in the ambient water free of algae, aiming to identify the responses of submersed aquatic macrophytes to nutrient enrichment, a common eutrophication problem in China and worldwide. Plant growth was not affected by different P concentrations in terms of biomass accumulation of stems and leaves. However, the contents of chlorophyll a and starch in plants decreased with increasing water P levels, whereas chlorophyll b and carotenoids declined with P level ranging from 0. 025 to 2. 5 mg P L⁻¹. The soluble sugar content decreased when water P concentration increased up to 2. 5 mg L⁻¹. The P content in plants increased with increasing water P levels, whereas plant N content decreased and soluble protein increased when water P concentration increased over 0. 25 mg L⁻¹, implying that P. crispus may have modified its metabolism to adapt to water P availability. When P concentration increased to 25 mg L⁻¹, the number and dry matter production of turions per plant decreased significantly. Meanwhile, there was a significant reduction in turion weight and the accumulations of soluble sugar and starch in turion, when water P concentration was over 0. 25 mg L⁻¹. The results suggest that turion formation in P. crispus is sensitive to P concentration in the ambient water, and high P levels may lead to decreases in P. crispus populations due to the decline in turion production.

    View record details
  • Spatial variation of structural and functional indicators in a large New Zealand river

    Collier, Kevin J.; Clapcott, Joanne E.; Duggan, Ian C.; Hamilton, David P.; Hamer, Mark P.; Young, Roger G. (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The ecological responses of large rivers to human pressure can be assessed at multiple scales using a variety of indicators, but little is known about how the responses of ecological indicators vary over small spatial scales. We sampled phytoplankton, zooplankton and macroinvertebrates and measured river metabolism and cotton strip breakdown rates (loss in tensile strength) in contrasting habitats along a 21-km urban-industrial reach on a constrained section of the Waikato River, New Zealand's longest river. Rates of gross primary production (2.8–7.8 g O₂/m²/d) and ecosystem respiration (3.5–12.7 g O₂/m²/d) did not differ consistently between near-shore (2–3 m from river side) and far-shore (ca. 10 m from side) locations, urban and industrial reaches or between autumn and spring sampling occasions. Rates of cotton decay (−k) ranged from 0.014 to 0.112 per day and were typically faster at far-shore locations and in the section of river receiving industrial inputs, but slower in spring compared with autumn. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis of phytoplankton and zooplankton data did not reveal spatial patterns relating to pressure or location (embayment, edge, mid-river). However, the macroinvertebrate ordination suggested distinct communities for the mid-river benthos compared with near-shore communities and a distinction between sites in the urban reach and the industrial reach. Our results suggest that large-river macroinvertebrate communities and cotton decay rates can be influenced to varying degrees by reach-scale pressures and local habitat conditions. Monitoring designs in spatially complex rivers should account for habitat heterogeneity that can lead to differences in structural and functional indicator responses.

    View record details
  • Nutrients and eutrophication: introduction

    McDowell, Rich. W.; Hamilton, David P. (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Cultural eutrophication stimulated by anthropogenic-derived nutrients represents one of the most common forms of compromised surface water quality in many developed and developing countries (Schindler 2012). In fresh water, both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) can potentially contribute to eutrophication (Carpenter et al. 1998). In lakes it is more common that excessive P inputs are the primary cause of eutrophication (Schindler 1977) although both global (Elser et al. 2007) and national surveys (Abell et al. 2011a) have increasingly highlighted excessive N inputs as an equal or more important cause. Debate on the relative roles of N and P limitation of lake phytoplankton is highly contentious, with a P-limitation paradigm (Schindler et al. 2008) challenged by those who contend that both P and N control are key elements of eutrophication management in freshwater systems (e.g. Conley et al. 2009; Scott and McCarthy 2010). Eutrophication of temperate estuaries and coastal waters is also common, but in contrast to fresh water, N is more commonly the controlling nutrient (Carpenter et al. 1998).

    View record details
  • Connectivity and complexity of floodplain habitats govern zooplankton dynamics in a large temperate river system

    Górski, Konrad; Collier, Kevin J.; Duggan, Ian C.; Taylor, Claire Maree; Hamilton, David P. (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    1. Large river–floodplain systems are characterised by seasonal flow variability. High flows lead to hydrological connection between the main channel and inundated off-channel lakes, wetlands and floodplains, which provide essential habitats for riverine biota. We tested the following hypotheses: (i) that crustacean zooplankton are more abundant in connected lentic habitats such as riverine lakes and wetlands and have a different community composition compared with the main channel and (ii) that vegetation structure will moderate abundances of crustacean zooplankton in the lower reaches of the Waikato River, New Zealand. 2. Zooplankton densities in main channel inflows and inundated floodplains showed clear seasonal changes, with cladoceran and copepod abundance peaks occurring in the majority of sites 2–3 weeks following the peak spring discharges (coinciding with the retreat of water from floodplains into the main channel). 3. Mean densities of zooplankton were highest in the inflows originating from riverine lakes (10–20 ind. Lˉ¹) where rotifers were dominant. We recorded significantly higher abundances of copepods in peat bog and swamp wetland inflows (c. 5 ind. Lˉ¹) relative to the main river channel and riverine lake inflows (0.1–1 ind. Lˉ¹). Some lake inflows also had high numbers of cladocerans (5–10 ind. Lˉ¹). 4. Inundated floodplains displayed heterogeneity in zooplankton community composition in relation to their structural complexity. Flooded forest accommodated higher numbers of copepods (c. 8 ind. Lˉ¹) and cladocerans (c. 17 ind. Lˉ¹) than flooded grassland, where zooplankton assemblages resembled those in the main river channel and were characterised by dominance of rotifers and low overall zooplankton densities (1–2 ind. Lˉ¹). 5. Our results suggest that seasonal flow and flood pulses, which determine the degree of connectivity of the main channel with the floodplain and off-channel habitats, govern zooplankton densities and community structure in this large temperate river. Furthermore, the structural complexity of floodplain habitats may play an important role in enhancing riverine zooplankton diversity. We postulate that the post-flood peak of large-bodied cladocerans and copepods might have historically played an important role in the provision of food for juvenile fish such as migrating Galaxiidae.

    View record details
  • Modelling the response of a highly eutrophic lake to reductions in external and internal nutrient loading

    Özkundakci, Deniz; Hamilton, David P.; Trolle, Dennis (2011-06)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The reduction of macronutrients to levels that limit primary production is often a critical element of mitigating eutrophication and reducing the potential for algal blooms. Lake Okaro has remained highly eutrophic despite an intensive catchment and in-lake restoration programme, including implementation of a constructed wetland, riparian protection, an alum application and application of a modified zeolite mineral (Z2G1) to reduce internal nutrient loading. A one-dimensional process-based ecosystem model (DYRESM-CAEDYM) was used in this study to investigate the need for further nutrient loading reductions of both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The model was calibrated against field data for a 2-year period and validated over two separate 1-year periods. Model simulations suggest that the trophic status of the lake, measured quantitatively with the Trophic Level Index (TLI), could shift from highly eutrophic to mesotrophic with external and internal loads of both N and P reduced by 75-90%. The magnitude of the nutrient load reductions is indicative of a major challenge in being able to effect transitions across trophic state categories for eutrophic lakes.

    View record details
  • Modelling the effects of Po River discharge, internal nutrient cycling and hydrodynamics on biogeochemistry of the Northern Adriatic Sea

    Spillman, C.M.; Imberger, J.; Hamilton, David P.; Hipsey, Matthew R.; Romero, J.R. (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This study investigates the coupling of physical and biological processes in the Northern Adriatic Sea through use of a dynamic mass balance approach derived from an interdisciplinary model of hydrodynamics and water quality. Emphasis is placed on modelling the role of nutrient inputs from the Po River and the response of phytoplankton concentrations and distributions, and basin-wide nutrient fluxes. The effects of riverine inflows, seasonal stratification and meteorological forcing were assessed with a dynamically coupled 3D hydrodynamic (ELCOM) and ecological (CAEDYM) model after validation with in situ field and remote sensing data. Model simulation results and mass balance calculations indicate a close coupling of physical and biological processes over a range of space and time scales. Comparison of fluxes from advection and particulate organic matter sedimentation indicate that nutrient and phytoplankton levels of the Northern Adriatic Sea are sensitive to variations in riverine nutrient loadings. A net total phosphorus accumulation of 4.61 × 10 kg⁶ was determined for the basin in 2002, with different climate scenarios and riverine nutrient loadings resulting in varied system responses reflected in this net TP accumulation. Changes in net accumulation of nutrients are considerably lower than variations in nutrient loadings, which suggests that the Northern Adriatic has substantial buffering capacity.

    View record details
  • Bioavailability of phosphorus transported during storm flow to a eutrophic, polymictic lake

    Abell, Jonathan Michael; Hamilton, David P. (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The bioavailability of catchment-derived particulate phosphorus (PP) to lentic phytoplankton was investigated. Two stream inflows to Lake Rotorua (Bay of Plenty, New Zealand) were sampled during moderate (March) and large (August) discharge peaks in 2012. Phosphorus (P) fractions in samples were quantified and a bioassay was undertaken using samples from the March event to determine whether P-limited phytoplankton could utilise PP. Phosphorus composition differed markedly between events but was comparable between streams. For the March event, all PP (persulphate extractable) was bioavailable if exposed to anoxia, whereas c. 25% was potentially bioavailable for the August event. Despite this, the laboratory bioassay indicated that, under oxic conditions, suspended sediments acted as a sink rather than a source of bioavailable P to P-limited phytoplankton. This study highlights the importance of considering P speciation and the nature of the receiving environment when assessing the bioavailability of P transported through hydrological landscapes.

    View record details
  • Solid-phase photocatalytic degradation of polystyrene plastic with goethite modified by boron under UV–vis light irradiation

    Liu, Guanglong; Zhu, Duanwei; Zhou, Wenbing; Liao, Shuijiao; Cui, Jingzhen; Wu, Kang; Hamilton, David P. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A novel photodegradable polyethylene-boron-goethite (PE-B-goethite) composite film was prepared by embedding the boron-doped goethite into the commercial polyethylene. The goethite catalyst was modified by boron in order to improve its photocatalytic efficiency under the ultraviolet and visible light irradiation. Solid-phase photocatalytic degradation of the PE-B-goethite composite film was carried out in an ambient air at room temperature under ultraviolet and visible light irradiation. The properties of composite films were compared with those of the pure PE films and the PE-goethite composite films through performing weight loss monitoring, scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photo-induced degradation of PE-Bgoethite composite films was higher than that of the pure PE films and the PE-goethite composite films under the UV-irradiation, while there has been little change under the visible light irradiation. The weight loss of the PE-B-goethite (0.4 wt.%) composite film reached 12.6% under the UV-irradiation for 300 h. The photocatalytic degradation mechanism of the composite films was briefly discussed.

    View record details
  • Low dissolved inorganic nitrogen and increased heterocyte frequency: precursors to Anabaena planktonica blooms in a temperate, eutrophic reservoir

    Wood, Susanna A.; Prentice, Matthew James; Smith, Kirsty Fiona; Hamilton, David P. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The relationship between heterocyte frequency, water temperature, nutrient concentrations and densities of Anabaena planktonica was examined in monomictic, eutrophic Lower Karori Reservoir (max. depth 21 m, area 0.034 km2), Wellington, New Zealand. Anabaena planktonica formed blooms and strongly dominated the phytoplankton assemblage during summer. The development of blooms of A. planktonica was associated with the set-up of stratification and increases in surface water temperature, with the peak of the bloom almost synchronous with maximum water temperature. The annual peak in heterocyte frequency preceded the bloom and occurred during a period of intensifying stratification. At this time, there were sustained low concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN: nitrate-N + ammonium-N) and the lowest ratios of DIN to soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), though ratios of total nitrogen to total phosphorus (TN:TP) were more variable. The apparent increase in nitrogen fixation capacity, based on increased heterocyte frequency, appears to be an important prerequisite to bloom formation for A. planktonica in the Lower Karori Reservoir. Monitoring heterocyte frequency may be a useful predictor for the occurrence of blooms of heterocytous cyanobacteria in eutrophic lakes due to the asynchronous nature of development of nitrogen limitation, heterocytes and vegetative cells.

    View record details
  • A mass balance evaluation of the ecological significance of historical nitrogen fluxes in Lake Kinneret

    Nishri, A.; Hamilton, David P. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Lake Kinneret (LK) is a monomictic lake that has undergone significant biological and chemical changes over the last three decades of the twentieth century. The transition between the 1970s and the 1980s attracted a lot of scientific attention as it was marked by significant changes in the ecology of the lake. In the early 1980s, phytoplankton biomass increased, apparently in response to an increase in the external soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) load. This period was marked by a rise in hypolimnetic levels of ammonium (NH4) and SRP as well as surface water dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH. Cconcomitantly, in surface waters in winter levels of NH4 increased and NO₃ decreased. In this study interrelationships amongst these observations were examined with a mass balance modelling approach, including simulation of individual nutrient sources and sinks, focusing on nitrogen fluxes in winter. The step-like rise in phytoplankton biomass in 1981 may have been triggered by the increase in winter external loads of SRP, as P is likely to be the growth-limiting nutrient during this season. The additional P load led to a sequence of changes including greater summer phytoplankton biomass, followed by enhanced sedimentation of organic matter. Furthermore, higher organic matter mineralization fluxes within the hypolimnion resulted in elevated levels of NH4 and SRP in this layer through the 1980s, with a feedback to productivity in the trophogenic zone following seasonal destratification in early winter. In an apparent transition period (late 1970s to early 1980s), an increase in the modelled rate of nitrate (NO₃) production occurred via nitrification together with increased uptake of the additional nitrate by phytoplankton. These results are consistent with increased phytoplankton abundance and elevated levels of surface water NH4 and DO during this period. Through this period the increase in phytoplankton uptake of NO₃ predominated over the increase in nitrification, and NO₃ concentrations in the 1980s were reduced compared with the previous decade, with increased partitioning of N in biomass and NH₄.

    View record details
  • Plant availability of boron adsorbed or occulted on goethite to rape (Brassica napus L.) seedling

    Ren, Liying; Cui, Jingzhen; Dong, Yuliang; Zhu, Duanwei; Liao, Shuijiao; Geng, Mingjian; Hamilton, David P. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of the study was to determine plant availability of boron (B) and relaxation of soil acid to rape seedling exhibited by B-doped goethite in acidic soil. For this purpose, two kinds of B-doped goethite were synthesized: one was goethite with adsorbed B prepared by reacting goethite with borax solution, and the other was goethite with occluded B by synthesizing goethite in the presence of boric acid. The reaction process in soil-like natural minerals of the B-doped goethite was simulated in a rhizobox culture system. Results showed that the B-doped goethite can provide available B for rape growth. Its addition on acidic soil can alleviate soil acidification by increasing soil pH and decreasing soil exchangeable acid. The observation that nutrient uptake was improved supports the view that the B-doped goethite improved soil quality, as also proved by the increase of root morphology and dry weight.

    View record details