20 results for Hughey, K. F. D., Book

  • A GIS based walkway management system

    Avery, M.; Clements, R.; Harrison, G.; Hughey, K. F. D.; Thompson, M.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The Walkway Management System (WMS) uses geographic information system (GIS) software to calculate an estimate for the level of maintenance required for walkway segments. It then assists the user in prioritising the maintenance on segments of the walkway that require repair. The development of the WMS is a cooperative effort between a team of researchers at Lincoln University and Department of Conservation (DoC) staff. DoC staff provided guidance and data, and the Lincoln University research team has implemented the system in Arc/Info software. This paper provides an analysis of the walkway maintenance problem and an overview of a GIS application developed for use as an applied tool for resource management.

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  • The river values assessment system: volume 1: overview of the method, guidelines for use and applications to recreational values

    Baker, M. A.; Hughey, K. F. D.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Many attempts over several decades have been made to develop priority lists of important rivers for different values (e.g., angling, kayaking, irrigation, native birds) in New Zealand. Apart from one or two of these most have lacked clear methods, have been data poor, have been ad hoc, and perhaps worst of all, have not been standardised to provide a method that could be applied to all values. It was within this context and with demonstrable Resource Management Act and related policy demands for such lists, that Tasman District Council sought to have a tool that would construct such lists developed. A review of the literature found that no method existed that could undertake this task, but that Multi Criteria Analysis provided a possible means forward. The River Values Assessment System (RiVAS) is a Multi Criteria Analysis based tool that enables any set of rivers to be prioritised for any specified value. The key elements of the tool are: It is expert panel based and uses the best available information – in some cases this will mean almost no quantitative scientific information (e.g., river swimming), while in others it will be mainly based on scientific data (e.g., native birds); The primary attributes and a key indicator of each for the value have to be identified and populated – these need to range from between 6-10 for manageability; Thresholds of high, medium, low relative significance need to be defined for each attribute’s indicator – these are then converted to numeric scales of typically 3 to 1 for high to low respectively; The sum of these numeric scores (sometimes weighted where particular criteria are more or less important than others) then forms the basis for the comparative importance ranking of this value between rivers; Predetermined criteria to define national, regional or local importance, or high, medium or low importance (depending on the value and related legal/policy issues) are then used to perform the ranking exercise; The end result is a list of ranked rivers (or segments depending on the value) for that value. The method has now been applied to multiple values in multiple regions, with a focus on repeat applications within Tasman District Council. This two volume report outlines the method used, provides a set of guidelines for its further implementation, and then provides multiple demonstrations of it in action. Through the course of these demonstrations the changes that have occurred are documented and all are consistent with the underlying method employed.

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  • The river values assessment system: volume 2: application to cultural, production and environmental values

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Baker, M. A.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Many attempts over several decades have been made to develop priority lists of important rivers for different values (e.g., angling, kayaking, irrigation, native birds) in New Zealand. Apart from one or two of these most have lacked clear methods, have been data poor, have been ad hoc, and perhaps worst of all, have not been standardised to provide a method that could be applied to all values. It was within this context and with demonstrable Resource Management Act and related policy demands for such lists, that Tasman District Council sought to have a tool that would construct such lists developed. A review of the literature found that no method existed that could undertake this task, but that Multi Criteria Analysis provided a possible means forward. The River Values Assessment System (RiVAS) is a Multi Criteria Analysis based tool that enables any set of rivers to be prioritised for any specified value. The key elements of the tool are: It is expert panel based and uses the best available information – in some cases this will mean almost no quantitative scientific information (e.g., river swimming), while in others it will be mainly based on scientific data (e.g., native birds); The primary attributes and a key indicator of each for the value have to be identified and populated – these need to range from between 6-10 for manageability; Thresholds of high, medium, low relative significance need to be defined for each attribute’s indicator – these are then converted to numeric scales of typically 3 to 1 for high to low respectively; The sum of these numeric scores (sometimes weighted where particular criteria are more or less important than others) then forms the basis for the comparative importance ranking of this value between rivers; Predetermined criteria to define national, regional or local importance, or high, medium or low importance (depending on the value and related legal/policy issues) are then used to perform the ranking exercise; The end result is a list of ranked rivers (or segments depending on the value) for that value. The method has now been applied to multiple values in multiple regions, with a focus on repeat applications within Tasman District Council. This two volume report outlines the method used, provides a set of guidelines for its further implementation, and then provides multiple demonstrations of it in action. Through the course of these demonstrations the changes that have occurred are documented and all are consistent with the underlying method employed.

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  • A national-level screening exercise to assess tourism’s vulnerability to climate change

    Becken, S.; Butcher, G.; Edmonds, J.; Hendrikx, J.; Hughey, K. F. D.; Reisinger, A.; Wilson, J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    It is widely acknowledged that over the 21st century the global community will need to adapt to the effects of climate change. Current climate models predict that New Zealand will experience increasing temperatures, changing frequency, intensity and distribution of rainfall events, decreased snow cover and sea level rise. Such changes will impact on key regional tourism drivers such as destination attractiveness, product content, business profitability, infrastructure planning and investment. Changes will manifest locally and will uniquely affect individual tourist destinations, communities and businesses. An ability to respond is therefore vital. Thus, the overarching goals of this research are: • Identifying which parts of the tourism industry are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change; • Developing key indicators which allow tourism businesses to measure, assess and track their vulnerability to climate change; • Establishing what adaptation measures are most appropriate for minimising vulnerability to the effects of climate change; and • Providing the tools necessary to achieving effective management, not only in terms of reducing vulnerability to climate change but also in identifying opportunities for taking advantage of a changing climate. This background paper will outline progress to date in relating to understanding tourism’s vulnerability at a national level. Following this stage, detailed analysis on vulnerability, indicators and adaptation measures will be undertaken in three case studies.

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  • Ecosystem services review of water storage projects in Canterbury: the Opihi River case

    Hearnshaw, E. J. S.; Cullen, R.; Hughey, K. F. D.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    There is an ever‐increasing demand for freshwater that is being used for the purposes of irrigation and land use intensification in Canterbury. But the impact of this demand has lead to unacceptable minimum river flows. In an effort to resolve these problems water storage projects that hydrologically modify rivers are considered. In order to consider the full range of values of the impact of impounding rivers, local and regional governments are considering the use of an ecosystem services approach. Ecosystem services are the various benefits that people can obtain from ecosystems. In this report an ecosystem services review is undertaken using a method that evaluates each ecosystem service with a selection of indicators. Specfically, in order to adequately capture ecosystem services, both biophysical and socio‐economic indicators need to be considered. To demonstrate an ecosystem services review, the method is used to assess the impact of the Opuha Dam on the ecosystem services provided by the Opihi River. A summary table of the impacts of the Opuha Dam is developed. It shows that there is conclusive evidence for a positive impact on only one ecosystem service, that of Freshwater Supply. The impact on other ecosystem services is uncertain, mixed or inconclusive. The inconclusiveness in the ecosystem services review about the impact on many ecosystem services occurs because only a few ecosystem services are adequately captured by both biophysical and socio‐economic indicators. Hence, efforts are needed to develop further indicators for many ecosystem services. Once these indicators are developed, an ecosystem services index can be established to quantify changes to the level of ecosystem services.

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  • Conservation and sustainable use of New Zealand flora: on non-conservation land

    Cullen, R.; Hughey, K. F. D.; Booth, K.; Crawford, K.; Allen, W.; Kilvington, M. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

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  • An inventory of natural asset monitoring tools: with recommendations for visitor impact monitoring applications

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Coleman, D.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The overall goal of the study is to develop a baseline inventory of natural asset condition and impact monitoring tools that can be used to derive lists of standard tools for visitor impact monitoring applications. It is based on identifying the main natural asset value categories, and the standard monitoring methods associated with these, then identifying which of these have valid visitor impact management applications.

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  • Public perceptions of New Zealand's environment: 2006

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Kerr, G. N.; Cullen, R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The fourth biennial survey of people’s perceptions of the state of the New Zealand environment was undertaken in February - March 2006. The survey is based on the Pressure-State-Response (PSR) model of state of the environment reporting. It tests New Zealanders’ perceptions of all the main resource areas and in 2006 also looked more specifically at land transport environmental, social and related issues, and people’s perceptions of government and individual priorities. Two thousand people aged 18 and over were randomly selected from the New Zealand electoral roll. An effective response rate of 46% was achieved. Data have been analysed descriptively and the 2006 survey responses were compared with responses from the 2004, 2002 and 2000 surveys. Statistical analyses of the responses were completed to determine the roles of several demographic variables.

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  • Management of Himalayan thar in New Zealand : high country farmer perspectives and implications

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Wason, K.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Himalayan thar (Hemitragus jemlahicus) were introduced and established in New Zealand in 1904. Thar are managed by the Department of Conservation (DoC) under the Himalayan Thar Control Plan (DoC 1993). They are present on lands in the central South Island high country and mountains: these lands are primarily conservation lands managed by DoC or Pastoral Leases occupied by high country farmers. The purpose of this report is: (1) to outline farmer perspectives about Himalayan thar and the management of thar on high country stations; and (2) to contribute to the ongoing debate about the future management of the species.

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  • Eco-tourism: An ally of nature conservation? Defining the rule and measuring the outcomes

    Booth, K. L.; Cullen, R.; Hughey, K. F. D.; Leppens, J.; Maher, P. T.; Simmons, D. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

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  • Public perceptions of New Zealand's environment: 2004

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Kerr, G. N.; Cullen, R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The third biennial survey of people’s perceptions of the state of the New Zealand environment was undertaken in February - March 2004. The survey was based on the Pressure-State-Response (PSR) model of state of the environment reporting. It tested New Zealanders’ perceptions of all the main resource areas and in 2004 also looked more specifically at freshwater and freshwater fishery issues. Two thousand people, aged 18 and over, were randomly selected from the New Zealand electoral roll. An effective response rate of 43% was achieved. Data have been analysed descriptively and the 2004 survey responses were compared with responses from the 2000 and 2002 surveys. Statistical analyses of the responses were completed to determine the roles of several demographic variables.

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  • Perceptions of conservation and the Department of Conservation: interim findings from the 2008 Environmental Perceptions Survey

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Kerr, G. N.; Cullen, R.; Cook, A. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

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  • Criteria to evaluate the application of policy instruments designed to internalise externalities from commercial fisheries : report to Ministry of Fisheries

    Cullen, R.; Hughey, K. F. D.; Kerr, G. N.; Memon, A.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    New Zealand has the world's fourth largest Exclusive Economic Zone and a very large commercial fishery. Arguably this fishery is one of the best managed in the world. Nevertheless, many problems remain to be solved, especially environmental problems. Many of these problems can be categorised as externalities from commercial fishing. We (Hughey et al. 2000) have identified a wide range of policy instruments which can be applied to the internalisation of these externalities. In this report we identify criteria against which each of these instruments should be evaluated before it is considered for implementation. The criteria are environmental, Treaty of Waitangi, socio-economic, recreational and management, respectively. We then evaluate the effectiveness of chosen instruments against these criteria. All of these tools can be used to enhance decision making in fisheries management and a framework for this decision making is proposed.

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  • ISO 14001 environmental management system performance: an evaluation of ten organisations in Canterbury, New Zealand

    Alexander, J.; Donaldson, D.; Mackle, K.; Marinov, M. G.; McKenna, M.; Lu, X. F.; Hughey, K. F. D.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The aim of our research was to undertake a qualitative evaluation of the performance of ISO 14001 in ten Canterbury based organisations. An evaluation framework was developed consisting of twenty-two questions based on the ISO 14001 auditable elements. This framework formed the basis for qualitative interviews with representatives from each organisation. Our research indicates that ISO 14001 is an effective Environmental Management System (EMS) that led to improvements in environmental performance, however not without some limitations.

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  • The impact of climate variability on tourism businesses in Wanaka and Queenstown

    Becken, S.; Wilson, J.; Hendrikx, J.; Hughey, K. F. D.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report summarises the findings from 27 operator interviews in Wanaka and Queenstown (June 2010). The main goal of the interviews was to identify which climatic factors are relevant to the different kinds of tourism businesses and how sensitive the businesses’ operation and economic viability are to specific conditions. Interviewees were also asked about the measures they put in place to deal with favourable or adverse weather conditions. The focus of the interviews was on the winter season, but relevant information on summer activities was included as well.

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  • Instruments for internalising the environmental externalities in commercial fisheries : report to Ministry of Fisheries

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Cullen, R.; Kerr, G. N.; Memon, A.; Robb, C.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Commercial fisheries in New Zealand having significant environmental externalities are identified and a framework for comparative Environmental Impact Assessment is proposed. From this analysis and from a survey of international literature covering the spectrum of resource sectors a range of 21 instruments within five broad categories is proposed as having potential for application within commercial fisheries management. These categories are: Regulatory approaches (9 instruments), Financial incentives (5 instruments), Voluntary approaches (4 instruments), Legal Remedies (1 instrument), and Education and Information Supply (2 instruments). Most of the regulatory and financial instruments have had some application in New Zealand, although 'environmental performance bonds' (used extensively in mining) might have potential for application to some fisheries. Voluntary approaches are being developed and there is potential for much further application in New Zealand, subject to auditing-type requirements. Legal remedies (tort law) and 'Informal regulation', including corporate environmental reporting, also offer potential as internalisation instruments. The major challenge facing fisheries managers is how to determine which instrument or combination of instruments is most likely to be effective in internalising the externality(s).

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  • An evaluation of the visitor action plan – Northland 2014

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Becken, S.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Globally and nationally there is increasing interest in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and how it relates to tourists and their management. A variety of response frameworks have been developed (see for example Tourism Queensland 2009, or the Hyogo Framework for Action (2005-2015) more broadly). In this report we evaluate the implementation of tourism and DRR approaches within the context of Northland, New Zealand. In 2012, research led to a tourism-specific disaster response template - the Visitor Action Plan (VAP). The VAP was specifically developed in response to concerns about actual and potential effects of cyclonic weather events and tsunamis on the Northland tourism sector and a lack of integration between Civil Defence and Emergency Management (CDEM) activities and tourism (Becken and Hughey 2013). The main purpose of this report is to present a formal evaluation of VAP implementation in Northland as a contribution to developing a DRR approach for tourism on the West Coast of the South Island. The remainder of this report is structured around: specifying aims and objectives, reviewing (briefly) pertinent evaluation literature and developing a framework against which to implement the evaluation, outlining the research methods, reporting and discussing the results, identifying issues and areas for improvement, and recommending future actions.

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  • Te Waihora / Lake Ellesmere: state of the lake and future management

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Taylor, K. J. W.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere is a large coastal lake, intermittently open to the sea. It is highly regarded for its conservation and related values, some of which are of international significance. Its function as a sink for nutrients from its large predominantly agriculturally based catchment, currently undergoing accelerated intensification, is also recognised, at least implicitly. It is the resulting conflict from these value sets which is mainly responsible for the ongoing debate about the future of the lake. This book serves to quantify the nature of this debate by documenting changes to lake values, both over time and spatially. It provides a standardised approach to reporting these changes, set against indicators that are value-specific. Ultimately, it provides a template for thinking about future management scenarios for the lake and its environs. Given this approach the book ultimately serves as a resource for helping understand the ever-changing and current and possible future states of the lake, under a variety of management requirements and implications.

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  • Perceptions of the state of New Zealand's environment: findings from the first biennial survey undertaken in 2000

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Kerr, G. N.; Cullen, R.; Cook, A. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The main aims of the research are to measure, analyse and monitor changes in New Zealanders' perceptions, attitudes and preferences towards a range of environmental issues, ultimately contributing to improved state of the environment reporting. Specific objectives are to: • Implement a questionnaire, operated biennially, to measure and monitor New Zealanders' environmental attitudes, perceptions, and preferences; • Provide independent commentary on key issues of public concern as a medium for providing policy advice to government and others; • Provide space for individual researchers to derive one-off research data for individual areas of interest, including teaching purposes; and • To report biennially, via a published report and other research publications, on findings from the questionnaire.

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  • Perceptions of the state of the environment: the 2002 survey of public attitudes, preferences and perceptions of the New Zealand environment

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Kerr, G. N.; Cullen, R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The second biennial survey of people's perceptions of the state of the New Zealand environment was undertaken in February 2002. The survey is based on the Pressure-State-Response model of state of the environment reporting. It tests perceptions of all the main resource areas, and in 2002 looked more specifically also at coastal management issues. Two thousand people, aged 18 and over, were randomly selected from the New Zealand electoral roll. An effective response rate of 45% was achieved. Data has been analysed descriptively and subject to statistical analyses in terms of comparing the 2002 survey response with that from 2000 and in terms of analyzing responses by several demographic variables.

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