7 results for Koorey, Glen, Conference poster

  • Effects on Motor Vehicle Behavior of Color and Width of Bicycle Facilities at Signalized Intersections

    Mangundu, E.; Koorey, Glen (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Research was undertaken in Christchurch, New Zealand to investigate motor vehicle behavior near bicycle facilities at signalized intersections. Motorists not keeping clear of such facilities may limit their usefulness and safety for bicyclists. The main research objective was to assess motorists’ avoidance of colored facilities in comparison to uncolored ones. The research also investigated if wide combined bicycle and traffic lanes encourage drivers to queue side-by-side, thereby encroaching into bicyclist spaces. 18 sites were identified to evaluate the effect of colored surfacing and lane widths on the rate at which motorists encroach on marked bicycle spaces. The sites contained either Advanced Stop Lines (ASL) or Advanced Stop Boxes (ASB) and were a mix of colored and uncolored facilities with “narrow” and “wide” lane combinations. Manual surveys were carried out to observe the positions of motor vehicles in relation to the bicycle facilities. Four of the uncolored sites were then colored and “after” surveys conducted. The results showed that drivers were much less likely to encroach on colored bicycle spaces in comparison to uncolored ones, particularly ASLs. Motorists were also more likely to encroach on bicycle lanes in “wide” lane combinations. It is recommended that road agencies continue coloring new and existing bicycle facilities at intersections, with preference given to existing ASLs over ASBs and sites with wider approaches. Traffic and bicycle lane combinations greater than 5.0 m (16½ ft) should also be avoided if separate turning traffic lanes are not present.

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  • Investigating and Modelling the Effects of Traffic Calming Devices

    Mao, J.; Koorey, Glen (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This research investigated the effects on traffic volumes, speeds and crashes of traffic calming devices on urban local streets. Eleven sites in Christchurch with street calming devices were evaluated using field surveys and network modelling using TrafikPlan, and compared with findings from a literature review. The main findings of the studies were: at seven sites that used vertical devices for treatment, five of them had reduced traffic volumes and speeds; at ten sites that used horizontal devices, eight of them had experienced reductions in volumes and speeds; from the crash history, it was found that road safety has been noticeably improved after installation of the traffic calming devices, with average crash reductions of 15-20%; in terms of network performance, TrafikPlan modelling seems promising for estimating traffic volume and speed changes on treated local streets and adjacent arterial roads. This paper will discuss these findings and speculate on how the devices investigated affect traffic behaviour. It is recommended that further research be conducted at more sites and for longer time periods to build up a comprehensive local database of traffic calming treatments. Future studies should also investigate the effectiveness of environment impacts of the devices, i.e. noise and air pollution.

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  • Calibration of Overseas Highway Crash Prediction Models for New Zealand - a Case Study with IHSDM

    Koorey, Glen (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Crash prediction models (CPMs) are an increasing feature of rural highway design practice internationally. A significant related development was the Interactive Highway Safety Design Model (IHSDM) in the US. However it would be difficult for every country to develop similar design tools with the same degree of complexity and research. Research has recently been exploring ways to assess the safety performance of rural highways in New Zealand. IHSDM was identified as worthy of further investigation, and a number of tasks were undertaken to adapt it for use in NZ. These included developing suitable data importing routines and calibrating IHSDM's CPM to match NZ crash patterns. A series of validation tests assessed IHSDM's effectiveness in predicting the relative safety of NZ rural roads. These included a “before and after” crash comparison of a major highway realignment, and checks of crash numbers along highway lengths in varying terrain. The investigations showed that IHSDM is a promising tool for safety and operational assessment of highway alignments (both existing and proposed) in NZ. However, IHSDM’s current lack of consideration for bridges and inconsistent road elements limit the ability of its CPM to assess sub-standard existing routes with as much accuracy as well-designed newer alignments.

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  • Investigating common trends in New Zealand cycling fatalities

    Koorey, Glen (2012)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Following the death of five cyclists in New Zealand during November 2010, The Chief Coroner announced a national Inquest to try and identify any common trends or information that could prevent a re-occurrence of such tragedies. However there was concern that the Inquest scope was of limited value without reference to a much larger sample of crashes. To help inform this Inquest, a larger investigation into NZ cycling fatalities dating back to 2006 was undertaken. The aim was to try to identify any consistent patterns in crash occurrences that were significantly over-represented. All cycling fatalities in NZ since January 2006 were identified from crash records and media reports; 75 fatalities were identified through to March 2012. Review of the relevant Police and media reports identified common attributes. Potential initiatives that could have prevented each fatality were also considered. Some notable trends were found. Older cyclists (>50 years) are very over-represented, despite their relatively low cycling involvement, and also more likely to be at fault. Fatalities involving heavy vehicles and/or state highways were also higher than expected. Poor observation by drivers was very common. The study also identified inconsistencies in crash information recorded, including recording of non-motor vehicle crashes and clothing/helmets worn. The study has provided valuable information to inform both the Inquest and transport safety agencies in general about what is needed to reduce the cycling road toll. It identifies additional trends that are not evident from just examining cycle injury crashes.

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  • Impacts of transport: encouraging potential cyclists

    Taylor, K.; Kingham, S.; Koorey, Glen (2009)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This poster presents research on impacts of sustainable transport, particularly encouraging commuter cycling. The study focused on issues perceived by potential commuter cyclists, a group underrepresented in transport research.

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  • The Effectiveness of Traffic Calming Pinch-Points

    Chai, C.; Nicholson, A.; Koorey, Glen (2011)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Research investigated the effect of roadway widths for street narrowings or "pinch-points" in Christchurch, with a particular focus on speed and yielding behaviour. A 6m wide 2-way pinch-point was found to be not effective in slowing most private vehicles down. Drivers travelled at a similar speed whether they were crossing the pinch-point by themselves or with opposing traffic approaching. Approximately 40% of drivers reduced their vehicle speed when negotiating a 5m wide 2-way pinch-point. Around 20% of drivers avoided traversing with oncoming traffic and opted to wait until it was clear before proceeding. Male drivers also tended to travel faster through the narrowing when compared to female drivers. For a 4.5m wide 1-way pinch-point where motor vehicles and cyclists approached them simultaneously, one of them gave way and waited nearly60% of the time. Around 35% of the time cyclists and motorists shared the narrowing and 8% of the cyclists (mostly younger children) avoided the narrowing, using a bypass instead. It is recommended that further research be conducted: 1. at more sites with different road widths and environment; 2. with heavy vehicle movements on these pinch-points; 3. to understand whether a longer pinch-point will alter driver behaviour.

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  • Neighbourhood Greenways: Invisible Infrastructure for Walking and Cycling

    Koorey, Glen (2012)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Some of the best walking and cycling routes in the world have few conventional pedestrian and cycle facilities. Neighbourhood greenways (aka "bicycle boulevards") are a form of street treatment where simple measures such as lower speeds, traffic restraints, wayfinding and crossing treatments are used to create an environment that is friendly for walking and cycling. They are particularly useful for connecting people to community facilities such as schools, parks, shops and other key destinations in a neighbourhood and beyond. Neighbourhood greenways are a popular tool in North America (e.g. Portland and Vancouver) but have yet to catch on here in New Zealand, despite many similarities in street environment. This paper outlines what kind of features typically make up neighbourhood greenways and how they combine to make walk/cycle-friendly streetscapes. Examples from North America will be shown, as well as a case study for how similar treatments could be applied in rebuilt Christchurch. Funding and implementation considerations for New Zealand will also be discussed.

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