9 results for Lin, E., Conference poster

  • The Acoustic Contrasts of Emotional Expressions in New Zealand English

    Jayakody, D.; Lin, E.; Looi, V. (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Listeners can identify emotions based on vocal cues (Banse & Scherer, 1996). This study aims at identifying the acoustical parameters that aid in recognizing different emotions, for a better understanding of the difficulties faced by cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid (HA)users in real life situations.

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  • Electrocochleography and Subjective Methods for the Diagnosis of Meniere’s disease

    Kalin, C.; Lin, E.; Hornibrook, J.; O’Beirne, G. (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    between electrocochleography (ECochG) measures and the subjective scores based on the clinical guidelines provided by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Committee on Hearing Equilibrium (AAO-HNS CHE) and the Gibson‟s Score. A total of 250 potential MD patients who have had their MD-related signs and symptoms documented and ECochG testing completed in the Department of Otolaryngology at Christchurch Hospital were included. A selection of details obtained from both the AAO-HNS CHE and ECochG testing results were examined to allow for an investigation on the function of these methods as a diagnostic tool for MD. The inter-method reliability between ECochG and the two subjective methods for the diagnosis of MD was found to be high. In addition, patients that tested “positive”, regardless of the diagnostic method used, showed a higher correlation among the four key symptoms of MD. These results demonstrate that ECochG is an effective diagnostic tool but should not be used as the sole assessment for the diagnosis of MD. This research provides empirical evidence in support of using ECochG as an effective tool as part of the differential diagnosis of MD.

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  • Acoustic Signs of Supraglottal Constriction in Pathological Voices

    Lin, E.; Ormond, T.; Hornibrook, J.; Henderson, N. (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Purpose: This study aims to identify the acoustic signs of supraglottal constriction and effects of some vocal manipulation techniques. It is hypothesized that some task-related acoustic contrasts would differ between voice patients with and without supraglottal constriction due to different vocal tract configurations. Method: Classified through videostroboscopic examinations, 30 participants were gender and age-matched to form two comparison groups (“constricted” and “non-constricted”), with five males and ten females in each group. Participants were asked to sustain a vowel (/a/ or /i/) for approximately three seconds in five tasks, including normal-pitch, low-pitch, high-pitch, /m/-onset (i.e., with the consonant /m/ preceding the vowel at normal pitch), and /h/-onset tasks. Acoustic signals were analyzed to extract measures from the mid-portion of the vowel. Results: The “constricted” group showed a lack of task-related contrasts on signal-to-noise ratio, singing power ratio, frequency of the second formant, and the amplitude difference between the first formant and the first harmonic. Conclusion: Further investigations are needed to assess the predictive power of the proposed task-based acoustic approach for detecting supraglottal constriction.

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  • The suitability of iPhone recordings for the acoustic measures of speech and voice quality

    Lin, E.; Hornibrook, J. (2011)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study examined the quality of iPhone recordings for acoustic measurements of speech and voice quality. A selection of acoustic measures were extracted from voice samples recorded using the “voice memo” application in an iPhone and compared with those derived from signals directly digitized (DD) in a laptop via a 12-bit A/D converter. Participants were 11 healthy adults, including six females and five males, aged between 27 to 67 years (Mean = 41.8 years, SD = 16.7). The participant was asked to read the first six sentences of the “rainbow passage”. In addition, two participants were asked to produce sustained vowels (/i/, /a/, and /u/) and a sentence (“We saw two cars”) ten times. The simultaneously recorded iPhone and DD signals were analysed to derive 10 acoustic measures, including spectral tilt for the whole sentence and fundamental frequency (F0), percent jitter, percent shimmer, signal-to-noise ratio, amplitude of the first harmonic relative to that of the second harmonic, singing power ratio, and frequencies of the first and second formants (F1 and F2), and vowel space area for the vowel segment. A series of Pearson’s correlation procedures revealed that measures from iPhone and DD signals were highly correlated. Findings of the vowel effect on the experimental measures obtained from iPhone signals were consistent with those from DD signals. However, the mean normalized absolute differences between measures from iPhone and DD signals are optimal (i.e., lower than 20%) only for F0, F1, and F2. These findings suggest that iPhone recordings are as adequate as other types of high quality digital recordings for acoustic measurements of voice quality but most voice measures from different digital recording systems are not directly comparable.

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  • Acoustic and perceptual evaluation of the quality of radio-transmitted speech

    Kirtikar, S.; Lin, E.; Robb, M.P. (2011)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    When speech signals are transmitted via radio, the process of transmission may add noise to the signal of interest (Biddulph, 1994; Coleman, 2004). This study aims to examine the effect of radio transmission on the quality of speech signals transmitted using a combined acoustic and perceptual approach.

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  • Hearing aid usage in different listening environments

    Eddie, S.; Lin, E. (2006)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Abstract 0166/Poster Board 314

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  • Effectiveness of visual biofeedback in speech training of children with hearing impairment

    Reid, E.; Lin, E. (2006)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Abstract 1951/Poster Board 265

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  • Acoustic Analysis in Foreign Accent Syndrome: A Case Study

    Walker, J.; Lin, E. (2006)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Abstract 1481/Poster Board 174

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  • The impact of breathiness on the intelligibility of speech

    Thompson, L.; Lin, E.; Robb, M.P. (2011)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The aim of this study is to determine how deterioration of voice quality, such as breathiness, may impact on the intelligibility of speech. Acoustic analysis was conducted on sustained vowel phonation as well as discrete segments taken from recorded sentences, retrieved from a database of voice disordered speakers. Measures included: frequency of the first two formants (F1, F2), singing power ratio, the amplitude difference between the first two harmonics (H1-H2 amplitude difference), voice onset time, and energy ratio between consonant and vowel (CV ratio). A series of two-way (glottal closure x vowel) repeated measures Analysis of Variances conducted on these acoustic measures showed a significant glottal closure (complete vs. incomplete) or glottal closure by vowel interaction effect for the F2 frequency, H1-H2 amplitude difference, and singing power ratio. Based on findings in literature that reported a dominant first harmonic as a useful predictor of breathiness, the measure of H1-H2 amplitude difference was selected as a factor for investigation of the impact of voice quality on the perception of vowel intelligibility and clarity. Fixed-length vowel segments at five levels of H1-H2 amplitude difference were presented to 10 male and 10 female inexperienced listeners between the ages of 19 and 34 years. It was expected that the tokens with a dominant first harmonic, indicative of a more breathy voice, would be associated with a lower rate of correct vowel identification and a lower rate of being perceived as “clearer”. The finding of a change of the perceptual ratings as a function of the H1-H2 amplitude difference will demonstrate the effect of voice quality on vowel intelligibility.

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