193 results for Lowe, David J.

  • Guidebook for Pre-conference North Island Field Trip ‘Ashes and Issues’, 28-30 November, 2008

    Lowe, David J.

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Guidebook for Pre-conference North Island, New Zealand Field Trip ‘Ashes and Issues’, 28-30 November, 2008. The route goes progressively towards the locus of the most recently active volcanic centres in central North Island. Concepts of upbuilding pedogenesis in tephra-mantled terrains will be discussed. Topical issues relating to soil and water quality and land management of intensive horticulture, pastoral farming (especially dairying), plantation forestry and C budgeting and modelling, and municipal effluent disposal by land treatment, will be considered as well. The declining quality of water in lakes in the Rotorua region and in Lake Taupo (mainly as a result of increasing N and P), and large-scale land-use conversions from plantation forestry to dairy farming in the Taupo area, and implications, are examined on days 2 and 3 of the trip.

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  • "New Zealand Soil Classification” by A.E. Hewitt [Book review]

    Lowe, David J. (1992)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The publication of `New Zealand Soil Classification' by Dr Alan Hewitt this year (Hewitt 1992a) represents a major milestone in New Zealand soil science. That it was one of the final publications of the now defunct DSIR is somehow appropriate because, as classification systems should, it provides (in a mere 133 pages) a synthesis of much of what has been learnt about the soils of New Zealand over the past 60 years or more, The new classification was officially launched at the New Zealand Society of Soil Science Conference in Rotorua on 16 November, 1992.

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  • Stop 2 Kainui silt loam and Naike clay, Gordonton Rd

    Lowe, David J. (2008)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    At this stop are several remarkable features both stratigraphic and pedological, and a “two-storied” soil, the Kainui silt loam alongside (in just a few places) the Naike clay. Both soils are Ultisols. The sequence of tephra beds and buried soil horizons spanning about 1 million years was exposed in 2007 by road works.

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  • Colin George Vucetich (1918–2007)—pioneering New Zealand tephrochronologist

    Lowe, David J.; Tonkin, Philip J.; Neall, Vincent E.; Palmer, Alan S.; Alloway, Brent V.; Froggatt, Paul C. (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Many Quaternarists, tephrochronologists, and soil scientists mourned the passing in New Zealand of Colin Vucetich—gentle mentor, pedologist, and pioneering tephrochronologist—on 25 April (Anzac Day), 2007. Colin was in his 89th year. As well as forming a 25-year partnership with W.A. “Alan” Pullar, with whom he published three classic papers on tephrostratigraphy based on field work undertaken by the pair largely in their own time, Colin inspired and mentored numerous postgraduates in his later career as an academic at Victoria University of Wellington. There he taught pedology, soil stratigraphy, and tephrochronology until his retirement as Reader (Associate Professor) in 1982. In retirement he was an honorary lecturer and supervisor at Massey University (Palmerston North) until 1991 (Fig. 1, Fig. 2 and Fig. 3).

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  • Assessing drivers of plantation forest productivity on eroded and non-eroded soils in hilly land, eastern North Island, New Zealand

    Heaphy, Marie; Lowe, David J.; Palmer, David John; Jones, Hayden S.; Gielen, Gerty J. H. P.; Oliver, Graeme R.; Pearce, Stephen H. (2014-07-02)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Methods: The impact of soil erosion by mass movement on forest productivity was investigated in a paired plot trial in a planted forest in a mainly hilly to steepland catchment (Pakuratahi) near Napier, eastern North Island, New Zealand. Tree growth and form were measured and soil properties analysed to compare productivity and productivity drivers in adjacent non-eroded and eroded plots. Background: The effect of soil erosion on New Zealand production forestry is not well known and there has been no research prior to our study into the relationship between soil nutrient status and planted forests growing in eroded soils in steeplands. Results: Regression analysis showed that the decreased soil total nitrogen, total carbon, total phosphorus, and soil organic matter content in eroded plots had a negative impact on tree volume, resulting in a 10% decrease in measured tree volume. Based on an assessment of log quality, trees in the eroded plots were forecast to produce 16% less volume from high-quality pruned logs (with associated reduction in revenue of around $4000 per hectare), than trees in non-eroded plots. The total recoverable volume (TRV), estimated (for a 25-year rotation) from the measured Pinus radiata D. Don trees growing on the eroded sites, was valued at $68,500, about 9% less than the estimated TRV from trees measured on non-eroded plots ($76,000). Tree form and mean tree height in eroded and non-eroded plots were not significantly different. Conclusions: Soil erosion impacts production in planted forests. Afforestation of erodible land provides a valuable ecosystem service through land and soil stabilisation but this service is currently not reflected in the market prices for timber in New Zealand. Maintaining the productive capacity of erodible soils through practices such as fertilisation or continuous-cover forestry can add further costs to production forestry. To ensure that sustainable forest practices are carried out to protect the productivity of soils, financial incentives may be justified.

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  • INTREPID Tephra-II: - 1307F

    Lowe, David J. (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The INTREPID Tephra project, “Enhancing tephrochronology as a global research tool through improved fingerprinting and correlation techniques and uncertainty modelling”, was an overarching project of the international community of tephrochronologists of the International Focus Group on Tephrochronology and Volcanism (INTAV), which in turn lies under the auspices of INQUA’s Stratigraphy and Chronology Commission (SACCOM). INTREPID’s main aim has been to advance our understanding and efficacy in fingerprinting, correlating, and dating techniques, and to evaluate and quantify uncertainty in tephrochronology, and thus enhance our ability to provide the best possible linking, dating and synchronising tool for a wide range of Quaternary research projects around the world. A second aim has been to re-build the global capability of tephrochronology for future research endeavours through mentoring and encouragement of emerging researchers in the discipline.

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  • Appendix A: Maps showing the distributions of lakes in New Zealand and their grouping into distinct districts reflecting the predominance of particular geological processes

    Green, John D.; Lowe, David J. (1987-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The large-scale maps of each of the lake districts show lakes with a maximum dimension ≥ c0.5 km.

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  • Appendix B: Some morphometric parameters of named lakes with areas [greater than or equal to] 1.0 km2, and some smaller lakes, in New Zealand

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D. (1987-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Gaps indicate uncertainty or that accurate data are unavailable. Note that lakes with fluctuating levels e.g., those used for hydro-electric purposes, or near coasts have varying parameters. Table based mainly on Irwin (1975) with some data from Cunningham et al. (1953), Irwin (1972), Jolly & Brown (1975), Irwin & Pickrill (1983), Howard-Williams & Vincent 1984, Boswell et al. (1985), Livingstone et al. (1986), N.Z.O.I. Lake Chart series, N.Z. Topographical Map Series NZMS1 (1:63 360) and NZMS26O (1:50 000), and other sources.

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  • An ashy septingentenarian: the Kaharoa tephra turns 700 (with notes on its volcanological, archaeological, and historical importance)

    Lowe, David J.; Pittari, Adrian (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Most of us are aware of the basaltic Tarawera eruption on 10th June 1886: the high toll on life (~120 people), landscape devastation, and loss of the Pink and White Terraces. But this was not the first time that Mt Tarawera produced an eruption of importance both to volcanology and human history. This edition of the GSNZ Newsletter marks the 700th anniversary of the Kaharoa eruption – its septingentenary to be precise – which occurred at Mt Tarawera in the winter of 1314 AD (± 12 years) (Hogg et al. 2003) (Fig. 1). The importance of the Kaharoa eruption is at least threefold. (1) It is the most recent rhyolite eruption in New Zealand, and the largest New Zealand eruption volumetrically of the last millennium. (2) The Kaharoa tephra is an important marker horizon in late Holocene stratigraphy and geoarchaeology (Lowe et al. 1998, 2000), and in particular helps to constrain the timing of settlement of early Polynesians in North Island (Newnham et al. 1998; Hogg et al. 2003; Lowe 2011). (3) There is a link between the soils that developed on the Kaharoa tephra, the animal ‘wasting’ disease known as ‘bush sickness’, and the birth of a government soil survey group as an independent organisation (Tonkin 2012).

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  • Mapping the productivity of radiata pine

    Palmer, David John; Watt, Michael S.; Kimberley, Mark O.; Hock, Barbara K.; Payn, Tim W.; Lowe, David J. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Forest owners, investors and policy makers all want to know the spread and productivity of New Zealand’s current and future radiata plantation. David Palmer, a geo-spatial analyst at Scion, has combined advanced statistical techniques with mapping technology to predict radiata 300 Index and Site Index for any location in New Zealand. The 300 Index is an index of volume mean annual increment, and the Site Index is for height and growth. The map of Site Index and 300 Index was built using growth measurement data from trees in 1,146 radiata pine permanent sample plots, planted between 1975 and 2003. The data was combined with a number of climate, land use, terrain and environmental variables to predict forest productivity under a range of conditions.

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  • Far-flung markers

    Lowe, David J.; Alloway, Brent V.; Shane, Phil A.R. (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Tephras are fragmentary materials that are blasted explosively into the air during volcanic eruptions. Distributed throughout Zealandia, tephras provide useful markers for connecting and dating land surfaces, sediment layers, and archaeological sites.

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  • Dusty horizons

    Lowe, David J.; Tonkin, Philip J.; Palmer, Alan S.; Palmer, Jonathan G. (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Dust whipped up and deposited by wind forms sheets of loess, which drape over the land. These loess deposits and the soils formed within them yield insights into past climatic and environmental change.

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  • Don Hogg: soil chemist and gentleman

    Lowe, David J. (1997)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Donald Elvery Hogg, a former member of the New Zealand Society of Soil Science, died on 21 November 1996. This obituary is a tribute to Don and to some of the contributions he made to soil science during his thirty-year career as a soil chemist at Ruakura Agricultural Research Centre, Hamilton.

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  • Review of “Soil Description Handbook – Revised Edition” by J.D.G. Milne et al.

    Lowe, David J.; Balks, Megan R. (1996)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book "Soil Description Handbook – Revised Edition", by J.D.G. Milne, B. Clayden, P.L. Singleton, & A.D. Wilson.

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  • Hostile shores: catastrophic events in prehistoric New Zealand and their impact on Maori coastal communities [Book Review]

    Lowe, David J. (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book: “Hostile shores: catastrophic events in prehistoric New Zealand and their impact on Maori coastal communities”, by Bruct McFadgen.

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  • Niwashi - a new tool for pedology and cover-bed stratigraphy in New Zealand

    Lowe, David J. (2000)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The Japanese Niwashi - literally 'garden master' - is a new field tool for dressing soil profiles or cleaning down stratigraphic sections comprising sottish or unconsolidated cover-bed deposits. Used for many years by Japanese pedologists, tephrochronologists, and volcanologists, the Niwashi has now become available in New Zealand. We have tried it out on a range of soils and various deposits and found it to be an excellent tool for field work in many situations.

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  • Kainui silt loam: how the lepard changed its spots

    Lowe, David J. (1991)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The Kainui silt loam occurs on low rolling hills in the northern part of the Hamilton Basin, and is well expressed in Hamilton City.

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  • Measuring radiation in the environment following the Fukushima nuclear disaster, Japan

    Lowe, David J. (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A group of scientists and technical staff from Toshiba Company, including Dr Hirokazu Kanai, undertook field trials at the station using a newly-developed, portable, two-dimensional gamma-ray visualization system known as a “Gamma Camera”.

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  • Holocene fluctuations of a meromictic Lake in southern British Columbia

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D.; Northcote, Tom G.; Hall, Ken J. (1997)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Holocene deposits of Mahoney Lake, a meromictic saline lake located in a closed basin in the semi-arid Okanagan Valley, contain evidence of frequent and marked changes in lake depth (up to >12 m/100¹⁴C yr) probably caused by short-term changes in effective precipitation. We studied a 5.45-m-long core comprising a basal layer of inorganic mud overlain by a succession of layers of calcareous laminated and nonlaminated organic mud, marl, and sand. We used Mazama tephra to adjust nine radiocarbon ages for the hardwater effect. Meromixis developed ca. 9000¹⁴C yr B.P., and the lake has been episodically meromictic for about half the time since. Because of close linkages between sediments and depositional environments in meromictic and saline lakes, we infer that laminated sediments indicate meromictic conditions and high lake levels (>ca. 12 m water depth), whereas thick marl layers and nonlaminated sediments indicate nonmeromictic conditions and thus low lake levels (<ca. 8 m depth). Many of the inferred short-term climatic changes have not been identified in previous studies in northwestern North America, perhaps because of insensitive climatic proxies, inadequate temporal resolution, or discounting of anomalous findings.

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  • Quaternary environmental change in New Zealand: a review

    Newnham, Rewi M.; Lowe, David J.; Williams, Paul W. (1999)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The discovery that orbital variations are the driving force behind Quaternary climate change provides an impetus to set local and regional records of environmental change into the global context, a principle that has been strongly embraced by Quaternary scientists working in New Zealand. Their major achievements and significant current initiatives are reviewed here. The importance of the New Zealand Quaternary stems from its geographical context: a climatically sensitive, remote oceanic, southern location spanning 17 degrees of the mid-latitudes; an obliquely convergent plate boundary setting resulting in a high mountain range athwart the prevailing westerlies, active volcanism, a youthful and dynamic landscape, and mountains high enough to maintain glaciers today; and a remarkably short prehistory. The resultant records show marked environmental changes due not only to climatic oscillations but also to vigorous, active tectonism and volcanism. The Taupo Volcanic Zone, containing the world's strongest concentration of youthful rhyolitic volcanoes, has produced at least 10 000 km3 of magma in the last 2 Ma. Climatic interpretations of records from marine sediments in the New Zealand region, together with several long sequences of alternating marine and terrestrial sediments, indicate broad synchrony with Northern Hemisphere events (within limitations of dating), although there are differences in detail for shorter-term climatic events. It is not yet certain that glacial advances coincided precisely with those in the Northern Hemisphere or were of similar duration. Late Cainozoic glaciation commenced c. 2.6-2.4 Ma but the record of glacial deposits is fragmentary and poorly dated except for the most recent events. The Last (Otira) Glaciation, from c. 100-10 ka, was characterized by at least five glacial advances including during the Last Glacial Maximum from 25 to 15 ka, when snowlines fell by 600-800 m. New Zealand evidence for cooling during the Younger Dryas stade is equivocal whilst isotopic records from speleothems, and other data, indicate warmer and wetter conditions from 10-7 ka, broadly conforming with records from mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere locations. Future advances will require sampling at shorter timescales, improvements in the accuracy and precision of existing dating methods and the development of new ones, extension of palaeoecological techniques to cover the full potential of New Zealand's diverse biota, and a stronger emphasis on quantification of palaeoclimatic parameters.

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