51 results for Purvis, Martin, Working or discussion paper

  • Role model based mechanism for norm emergence in artificial agent societies

    Savarimuthu, Bastin Tony Roy; Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin; Purvis, Maryam A. (2007-07)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    A revised version of this paper appears in the Proceedings of the AAMAS'07 Workshop on Coordination, Organization, Institutions and Norms in Agent Systems (COIN), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, 14th May, pp. 1-12. See http://www.ia.urjc.es/COIN2007/ for further details.

    View record details
  • Neuro-fuzzy methods for environmental modelling

    Purvis, Martin; Kasabov, Nikola; Benwell, George L; Zhou, Qing Qing; Zhang, Feng (1998-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper describes combined approaches of data preparation, neural network analysis, and fuzzy inferencing techniques (which we collectively call neuro-fuzzy engineering) to the problem of environmental modelling. The overall neuro-fuzzy architecture is presented, and specific issues associated with environmental modelling are discussed. A case study that shows how these techniques can be combined is presented for illustration. We also describe our current software implementation that incorporates neuro-fuzzy analytical tools into commercially available geographical information system software.

    View record details
  • Connectionist-based information systems: a proposed research theme

    Kasabov, Nikola; Purvis, Martin; Sallis, Philip (1996-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This PDF was created from a converted WordPerfect document. While all reasonable efforts have been made to reproduce the original paper as closely as possible, some formatting in the PDF may vary from the original hard-copy paper.

    View record details
  • Using genetic algorithms for an optical thin-film learning model

    Li, Xiaodong; Purvis, Martin (1996-10)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

    View record details
  • Partner selection mechanisms for agent cooperation

    Ebadi, Toktam; Purvis, Martin; Purvis, Maryam A. (2008-10)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    In a multi-agent system, a single agent may not be capable of completing complex tasks. Therefore agents are required to form a team to fulfill the task requirements. In this paper an agent model is introduced that facilitates cooperation among agents. A multi-threaded multi-agent simulation framework is designed to test the model. The experimental results demonstrate that the model is significantly useful in achieving cooperation under various environmental constraints. It also allows agents to adjust their teammate selection strategies according to environmental constraints.

    View record details
  • Communicative acts and interaction protocols in a distributed information system

    Nowostawski, Mariusz; Carter, Dan; Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin (2003-05)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    In FIPA-style multi-agent systems, agents coordinate their activities by sending messages representing particular communicative acts (or performatives). Agent communication languages must strike a balance between simplicity and expressiveness by defining a limited set of communicative act types that fit the communication needs of a wide set of problems. More complex requirements for particular problems must then be handled by defining domain-specific predicates and actions within ontologies. This paper examines the communication needs of a multi-agent distributed information retrieval system and discusses how well these are met by the FIPA ACL.

    View record details
  • Software effort estimation: Harmonizing algorithms and domain knowledge in an integrated data mining approach

    Purvis, Martin; Deng, Jeremiah D.; Purvis, Maryam A. (2009-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Software development effort estimation is important for quality management in the software development industry, yet its automation still remains a challenging issue. Applying machine learning algorithms alone often can not achieve satisfactory results. In this paper, we present an integrated data mining framework that incorporates domain knowledge into a series of data analysis and modeling processes, including visualization, feature selection, and model validation. An empirical study on the software effort estimation problem using a benchmark dataset shows the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

    View record details
  • View-based consistency and its implementation

    Huang, Zhiyi; Sun, Chengzheng; Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin (2001-05)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper proposes a novel View-based Consistency model for Distributed Shared Memory. A view is a set of ordinary data objects that a processor has the right to access in a data-race-free program. The View-based Consistency model only requires that the data objects of a view are updated before a processor accesses them. Compared with other memory consistency models, the View-based Consistency model can achieve data selection without user annotation and can reduce much false-sharing effect. This model has been implemented based on TreadMarks. Performance results have shown that for all our applications the View-based Consistency model outperforms the Lazy Release Consistency model.

    View record details
  • Tag based model for knowledge sharing in agent society

    Savarimuthu, Sharmila; Purvis, Martin; Purvis, Maryam A. (2009-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    In this paper we discuss a tag-based model that facilitates knowledge sharing in the context of agents playing the knowledge sharing game. Sharing the knowledge incurs a cost for the sharing agent, and thus non-sharing is the preferred option for selfish agents. Through agent-based simulations we show that knowledge sharing is possible even in the presence of non-sharing agents in the population. We also show that the performance of an agent society can be better when some agents bear the cost of sharing instead of the whole group sharing the cost.

    View record details
  • Integrating expectation handling into Jason

    Ranathunga, Surangika; Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin (2011-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Although expectations play an important role in designing cognitive agents, agent expectations are not explicitly being handled in most common agent programming environments. There are techniques for monitoring fulfilment and violation of agent expectations, however they are not linked with common agent programming environments so that agents can be easily programmed to respond to these circumstances. This paper investigates how expectation monitoring tools can be tightly integrated with the Jason BDI agent interpreter by extending it with built-in actions to initiate and terminate monitoring of expectations, and demonstrates how an external expectation monitor is linked with Jason using these internal actions.

    View record details
  • Automating information processing tasks: an agent-based architecture

    Cranefield, Stephen; McKinlay, Bryce; Moreale, Emanuela; Purvis, Martin (1998-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper describes an agent-based architecture designed to provide automation support for users who perform information processing tasks using a collection of distributed and disparate software tools and on-line resources. The architecture extends previous work on agent-based software interoperability. The unique features of the information processing domain compared to distributed information retrieval are discussed and a novel extension of hierarchical task network (HTN) planning to support this domain is presented.

    View record details
  • Software cinema

    Bruegge, Bernd; Purvis, Martin; Creighton, Oliver; Sandor, Christian (2003-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The process for requirements elicitation has traditionally been based on textual descriptions or graphical models using UML. While these may have worked for the design of desktop-based systems, we argue, that these notations are not adequate for a dialog with mobile end users, in particular for end users in “blue collar” application domains. We propose an alternative modelling technique “Software Cinema” based on the use of digital videos. We discuss one particular example of using Software cinema in the design of a user interface for a navigation system of a mobile end user.

    View record details
  • A membership function selection method for fuzzy neural networks

    Zhou, Qing Qing; Purvis, Martin; Kasabov, Nikola (1997-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Fuzzy neural networks provide for the extraction of fuzzy rules from artificial neural network architectures. In this paper we describe a general method, based on statistical analysis of the training data, for the selection of fuzzy membership functions to be used in connection with fuzzy neural networks. The technique is first described and then illustrated by means of two experimental examinations.

    View record details
  • Generating ontology-specific content languages

    Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin (2001-05)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper examines a recent trend amongst software agent application and platform developers to desire the ability to send domain-specific objects within inter-agent messages. If this feature is to be supported without departing from the notion that agents communicate in terms of knowledge, it is important that the meaning of such objects be well understood. Using an object-oriented metamodelling approach, the relationships between ontologies and agent communication and content languages in FIPA-style agent systems are examined. It is shown how object structures in messages can be considered as expressions in ontology-specific extensions of standard content languages. It is also argued that ontologies must distingish between objects with and objects without identity.

    View record details
  • Agent modelling with Petri nets

    Purvis, Martin; Cranefield, Stephen (1996-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The use of intelligent software agents is a modelling paradigm that is gaining increasing attention in the applications of distributed systems. This paper identifies essential characteristics of agents and shows how they can be mapped into a coloured Petri net representation so that the coordination of activities both within agents and between interacting agents can be visualised and analysed. The detailed structure and behaviour of an individual agent in terms of coloured Petri nets is presented, as well as a description of how such agents interact. A key notion is that the essential functional components of an agent are explicitly represented by means of coloured Petri net constructs in this representation.

    View record details
  • Integrating environmental information: Incorporating metadata in a distributed information systems architecture

    Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin (2000-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    An approach is presented for incorporating metatata constraints into queries to be processed by a distributed environmental information system. The approach, based on a novel metamodel unifying concepts from the Unified Modelling Language (UML), the Object Query Language (OQL), and the Resource Description Framework (RDF), allows metadata information to be represented and processed in combination with regular data queries.

    View record details
  • An architecture for self-organising evolvable virtual machines

    Nowostawski, Mariusz; Purvis, Martin; Cranefield, Stephen (2004-11)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Contemporary software systems are exposed to demanding, dynamic, and unpredictable environments where the traditional adaptability mechanisms may not be sufficient. To imitate and fully benefit from life-like adaptability in software systems, that might come closer to the complexity levels of biological organisms, we seek a formal mathematical model of certain fundamental concepts such as: life, organism, evolvability and adaptation. In this work we will concentrate on the concept of software evolvability. Our work proposes an evolutionary computation model, based on the theory of hypercycles and autopoiesis. The intrinsic properties of hypercycles allow them to evolve into higher levels of complexity, analogous to multi-level, or hierarchical evolutionary processes. We aim to obtain structures of self-maintaining ensembles, that are hierarchically organised, and our primary focus is on such open-ended hierarchically organised evolution.

    View record details
  • The NZDIS project: An agent-based distributed information systems architecture

    Purvis, Martin; Cranefield, Stephen; Bush, Geoff; Carter, Dan; McKinlay, Bryce; Nowostawski, Mariusz; Ward, Roy (1999-08)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper describes an architecture for building distributed information systems from existing information resources, based on distributed object and software agent technologies. This architecture is being developed as part of the New Zealand Distributed Information Systems (NZDIS) project. An agent-based architecture is used: information sources are encapsulated as information agents that accept messages in an agent communication language (the FIPA ACL). A user agent assists users to browse ontologies appropriate to their domain of interest and to construct queries based on terms from one or more ontologies. One or more query processing agents are then responsible for discovering (from a resource broker agent) which data source agents are relevant to the query, decomposing the query into subqueries suitable for those agents (including the translation of the query into the specific ontologies implemented by those agents), executing the subqueries and translating and combining the subquery results into the desired result set. Novel features of this system include the use of standards from the object-oriented community such as the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) (as a communications infrastructure), the Unified Modeling Language (used as an ontology representation language), the Object Data Management Group's Object Query Language (used for queries) and the Object Management Group's Meta Object Facility (used as the basis for an ontology repository agent). Query results need not be returned within an ACL message, but may instead be represented by a CORBA object reference which may be used to obtain the result set.

    View record details
  • A distributed architecture for environmental information systems

    Purvis, Martin; Cranefield, Stephen; Nowostawski, Mariusz (1999-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The increasing availability and variety of large environmental data sets is opening new opportunities for data mining and useful cross-referencing of disparate environmental data sets distributed over a network. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, environmental information systems will need to operate effectively in a distributed, open environment. In this paper, we describe the New Zealand Distributed Information System (NZDIS) software architecture for environmental information systems. In order to optimise extensibility, openness, and flexible query processing, the architecture is organised into collaborating software agents that communicate by means of a standard declarative agent communication language. The metadata of environmental data sources are stored as part of agent ontologies, which represent information models of the domain of the data repository. The agents and the associated ontological framework are designed as much as possible to take advantage of standard object-oriented technology, such as CORBA, UML, and OQL, in order to enhance the openness and accessibility of the system.

    View record details
  • An agent-based architecture for software tool coordination

    Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper presents a practical multi-agent architecture for assisting users to coordinate the use of both special and general purpose software tools for performing tasks in a given problem domain. The architecture is open and extensible being based on the techniques of agent-based software interoperability (ABSI), where each tool is encapsulated by a KQML-speaking agent. The work reported here adds additional facilities for the user to describe the problem domain, the tasks that are commonly performed in that domain and the ways in which various software tools are commonly used by the user. Together, these features provide the computer with a degree of autonomy in the user's problem domain in order to help the user achieve tasks through the coordinated use of disparate software tools. This research focuses on the representational and planning capabilities required to extend the existing benefits of the ABSI architecture to include domain-level problem-solving skills. In particular, the paper proposes a number of standard ontologies that are required for this type of problem, and discusses a number of issues related to planning the coordinated use of agent-encapsulated tools.

    View record details