8 results for Book, 1990

  • Intra-conference and Post-conference Tour Guides, International Inter-INQUA Field Conference and Workshop on Tephrochronology, Loess, and Paleopedology

    Lowe, David J. (1994-02-01)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand consists of a cluster of islands, the three largest being North, South, and Stewart, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. They have a total land area of about 270 000 km2 (similar to that of the British Isles or Japan). The islands are the small emergent parts of a much larger submarine continental mass (Fig. 0.1) that was rafted away from Australia and Antarctica by sea-floor spreading in the proto-Tasman Sea between 85 and 60 Ma. Much of this New Zealand subcontinent is a remnant of the former eastern margin of Gondwanaland, the ancient southern supercontinent. The mainland islands form a long, narrow, NE-SW trending archipelago bisected by an active, obliquely converging, boundary between the Australian and Pacific lithospheric plates (Fig. 0.2), which has evolved over the last 25 million years (Kamp 1992). The plate boundary is marked by active seismicity and volcanic arcs, illustrating New Zealand's position as part of the Circum-Pacific Mobile Belt -the so-called "Pacific Ring of Fire". The NE-SW trend of the modem plate boundary cuts across mainly NW-SE oriented structural features inherited from earlier (mid-Cretaceous) rifting events.

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  • Clay mineralogy of tephras and associated paleosols and soils, and hydrothermal deposits, North Island [New Zealand]

    Lowe, David J.; Percival, H.J. (1993-07-01)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Tour themes and itinerary The tour centres on the occurrence and genesis of clay minerals, especially allophane, halloysite, and ferrihydrite, associated with both Quaternary rhyolitic airfall tephra (volcanic ash) deposits and volcanogenic alluvium, and on mineralisation and thermal activity in hydrothermal fields. After a brief overview of the basaltic volcanoes of Auckland City, our route essentially traverses the Central Volcanic Region by way of a large loop with overnight stops at Rotorua (2 nights), Tokaanu, and Auckland (Fig. 0.1). We have around five stops planned for each day (including lunch), three of these being scientific stops except on Day 4 when we have only one scientific stop because of the need to travel greater distances. Our route takes us progressively towards the locus of the most recently active volcanic centres of the Central Volcanic Region, and so the surficial tephra deposits and buried paleosols become successively younger and generally less weathered: tephras at the Mangawara section (Day 1) span c. 1 Ma; at Tapapa (Day 2), c. 140 ka; at Te Ngae (Day 2), c. 20 ka; and at De Bretts, c. 10 ka, and Wairakei, c. 2 ka (Day 3). Interspersed with these tephra-paleosol sections are stops to examine an allophane-halloysite soil drainage (leaching) sequence on volcanogenic alluvium (Day 1), hydrothermal activity and mineral deposits at Whakarewarewa (Day 2) and Waiotapu (Day 3), and pure ferrihydrite seepage deposits in Hamilton (Day 4). Following introductory and detailed background review material, the tour guide has been arranged on a day-by-day basis and includes an outline of the route and stops, and several pages describing the stratigraphy, mineralogy, chemistry, and pedology of the deposits or features at each of the main stops. We will attempt to point out and describe geological and other features as appropriate during travel periods. Other activities Examples of New Zealand's distinctive fauna and flora, including kiwis and tuataras, will be seen at close quarters at Rainbow Springs (Day 2), where we will also enjoy an agricultural farm show. In Rotorua we will partake in a Maori hangi (steam-cooked feast) and concert including traditional dance forms (hakas) and songs (Day 2). In Tokaanu, hot pools will be available to relax in near the slopes of Mt Tongariro (Day 3). At Waitomo, we will visit the Waitomo Cave and in Hamilton spend a short time at the Waikato Museum of Art and History (Day 4). Finally, the tour will conclude with a farewell dinner in Auckland.

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  • Caught between cultures : a New Zealand-born Pacific Island perspective

    Tiatia-Seath, Sipaea (1998)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Gendered Kiwi

    (1999)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Gendered Kiwi, a collection of essays, analyses the ways Pākehā masculinity and femininity – gender relations – have changed over time. It brings together previously unpublished essays on topics as diverse as 1930s fashion and feminist men in the 1970s. Scholars such as Charlotte Macdonald re-open the debate about whether colonial New Zealand was really a man’s country, while Jock Philips asks new questions about late-twentieth-century leisure. Other writers canvass the stresses of depression-era masculinity, men’s and women’s different use of public space, office politics and power dressing. Gender relations and the family are a theme in several essays, including those about the colonial family, nineteenth-century criminal trials and World War II. The Gendered Kiwi builds on existing work in men’s and women’s history and points to new ways to analyse New Zealand’s past.

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  • Guns and gold : as a result of reforms, New Zealand's Chief of Defence Force has a range of powers enjoyed by no other military chief in the West

    Smith, A (1999)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Private Pensions in New Zealand: Can they Avert the 'Crisis'?

    St John, S; Ashton, Toni (1993)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    The past five years have been a turbulent time for superannuation policy in New Zealand. This is nothing new. In the post-war period, there have been a number of dramatic changes as outlined in the earlier book by the authors, Superannuation in New Zealand, Averting the Crisis. What seems to be different in the early nineties is a sense of urgency, a need to end the policy instability and create certainty in the face of the impending demographic pressures. In many ways, New Zealand is very unusual with a tax neutral savings regime for private pensions and a non-contributory flat-rate state pension. As in other countries, there has been a strong move to encourage a shift away from state provision to take the 'burden' off workers of the future. The economic thinking behind this suggestion needs careful review. rather than assuming a shift will solve the problem, this book sets out a broader context in which all forms of public and private mixes can be evaluated against society's chosen income distribution objectives. This book was written during the period in which the government- appointed Task Force on Private Provision for Retirement was deliberating on how best to encourage greater self-reliance of retired people. The aim of this book is to contribute to the debate on the recommendations of the Task Force and to provide an historical and international context for that debate.

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  • Planning for life : Public Trust, once the conservative guardian of wills and estates, is now giving lawyers and financial planners a run for their money

    Smith, A (1999)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Suffrage and beyond: international feminist perspectives

    (1994)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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