1,161 results for Book, Lincoln University Research Archive

  • West Coast visitor report

    Moran, D.; Sleeman, R.; Simmons, D. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report provides assessment of the visitor profile for the Tourism West Coast region, and specifically covers: visitor arrivals; accommodation statistics; and visitor spending.

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  • Visitors to the West Coast : characteristics, attractions and decision-making

    Moore, K.; Simmons, D. G.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report presents results from a survey of visitors to the West Coast, New Zealand, which investigated visitors' general characteristics (e.g., age, gender, origin country, transport type, group type, etc.), perceived attractions of the West Coast and their decision-making processes (purpose of visit, the timing of itinerary planning and destination decisions, perceived influences on those decisions).

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  • Visitors' and locals' experiences of Westland, New Zealand

    Fairweather, J. R.; Newton, B.; Swaffield, S. R.; Simmons, D. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of visitors' and locals' experiences of the Westland landscape and infrastructure. The interest in landscape experience reflects the central role that both passive and active involvement in landscape plays in the Westland tourism industry. The interest in infrastructure reflects the critical role that provision of basic services to support tourists, and the management of the tourists' impact on the environment, will have in the development of sustainable tourism.

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  • Tourism and Maori development in Westland

    Zygadlo, F. K.; Matunga, H. P.; Simmons, D. G.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The main aim of this report is to provide an understanding of Maori tourism in order to enhance the ability of both new and established Maori tourist operators, their organisations and the wider Maori community to develop Maori tourism in ways that sustain Maori culture in a manner acceptable to Maori. To achieve this aim, the report has the following objectives: to document accurately the current state of Maori involvement in the tourism industry; to describe and interpret the perceptions that Maori have of tourism and how these have changed over time; to identify the current use of Maori culture as attractions; to record Maori responses to the changes in the relationship between themselves and the natural environment; and to identify barriers to Maori tourism development.

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  • The economic impact of tourism on Westland District

    Butcher, G.; McDonald, G.; Fairweather, J. R.; Simmons, D. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    In recent years tourism has been one of the fastest growing sectors of the New Zealand economy, and has become particularly important in some smaller communities. It has become particularly important in regions (such as Westland) which have suffered from a decline in long-established industries (timber in the case of Westland). What is uncertain is just how important the industry is, both in terms of its direct impacts and also its indirect impacts. The original principal objective of this study was to estimate the relationship between such direct and indirect effects by surveying a sample of tourism businesses to find out their expenditure patterns, to incorporate this information into a model of the regional economy and calculate tourism multipliers (the ratio of direct impacts to total impacts for various types of visitor expenditure), and to see if this ratio appears to be changing over time. During the research it became apparent that the existing estimates of direct visitor expenditure were unreliable (particularly estimates broken down by type of expenditure) and the measurement of the level of direct expenditure became a further objective of the research. Another objective of this study was to pilot an environmental accounting mechanism (if possible, based on input-output models) for tourism at the regional level.

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  • The economic impact of tourism on Rotorua

    Butcher, G.; Fairweather, J. R.; Simmons, D. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    In recent years tourism has been one of the fastest growing sectors of the New Zealand economy, and has become particularly important in some of the smaller communities. What is uncertain is just how important the industry is, both in terms of its direct impacts and also its indirect impacts. The objective of this study was to estimate the relationship between such direct and indirect effects by surveying a sample of tourism businesses to find out their expenditure patterns, to incorporate this information into a model of the regional economy and calculate tourism multipliers (the ratio of direct impacts to total impacts for various types of visitor expenditure), and to see if this ratio is changing over time. During the research it became necessary to calculate the direct visitor expenditure by a survey of visitors to Rotorua to establish relative rates of expenditure in different sectors, and to apply these ratios to existing data on output of the accommodation industry. An estimate of direct employment in the visitor attractions industry was made on the basis of this project's census of businesses involved in visitor activities and attractions. This was used with this project's estimates of employment : output ratios to also calculate output for the attractions industry.

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  • Enhancing financial and economic yield in tourism: public sector: central government benefits and costs of tourism

    Cullen, R.; Becken, S.; Butcher, G.; Lennox, J.; Simmons, D. G.; Taylor, N.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report describes the national public sector direct inputs, and outline society’s indirect inputs, into tourism production and consumption. The public sector and societal benefits that accrue from tourism will also be assessed. A subsequent report (Yield report 11) examines local government costs and benefits alongside the regional yield (value added) generated from tourism. This report is one of a series of reports within the government funded research programme “Enhancing the financial and economic yield for tourism”. The research follows two streams: an analysis of private sector investment and management and a parallel analysis of public sector benefit and costs arising from the operation of the tourism sector in New Zealand. It is towards this latter objective that the current report is directed. It aims to quantify the level of the public sector (local, regional, and national) direct inputs, and outline society’s direct and indirect inputs, into tourism production and consumption. The public sector and societal benefits that accrue from tourism are also assessed.

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  • Economics objective synthesis report

    Saunders, C.; Greer, G.; Zellman, E.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The research undertaken by the ARGOS Economic Research Objective includes a wide range of research areas, many of which do not involve comparison of data from sector panels. The team monitors and reviews market access factors that may affect New Zealand agricultural producers’ opportunity to export products to key markets, such as trade policies, market audit systems, and non-technical trade barriers. Ongoing consumer behaviour research is also undertaken to better understand consumer trends and attitudes towards food. Trade modelling comprises a large component of the Economic Research Objective to investigate the impacts of changes and potential changes in world markets on New Zealand trade. In addition, a bioeconomic model of on-farm weed control has been developed to identify optimum methods of weed control accounting for physical and financial constraints. Another area of research is the assessment of optimal approaches to supply chain management for societal and business outcomes.

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  • Constrained visualization using the Shepard Interpolation Family

    Brodlie, K. W.; Asim, M. R.; Unsworth, K.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This paper discusses the problem of visualizing data where there are underlying constraints that must be preserved. For example, we may know that the data is inherently positive. We show how the Modified Quadratic Shepard method, which interpolates scattered data of any dimensionality, can be constrained to preserve positivity. We do this by forcing the quadratic basis functions to be positive. The method can be extended to handle other types of contraints, including lower bound of 0 and upper bound of 1, as occurs with fractional data. A further extension allows general range restrictions, creating an interpolant that lies between any two specified functions as the lower and upper bounds.

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  • The Proceedings of the Lincoln College Farmers' Conference 1986

    Malcolm, J. P.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The published proceedings of the 36th Lincoln College Farmers' Conference, held in 1986.

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  • A review of rentals for pastoral leases

    Kerr, I. G. C.; Frizzell, Ralph; Ross, B. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    2nd ed. reprinted in 1980.

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  • Electric fencing

    Weston, L. H.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    First edition published 1964.

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  • Social objective synthesis report: differentiation among participants farmers/orchardists in the ARGOS research programme

    Rosin, C.; Hunt, L. M.; Fairweather, J. R.; Campbell, H.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The main objectives of this report are to assess the extent to which it is possible to differentiate among the management system panels of ARGOS farms/orchards and to assess how such difference is manifest in the social dimensions of farm life. The report is framed by a brief outline of the social dynamics of agricultural sustainability and the emerging significance of market audit systems as a key structuring feature of contemporary attempts to achieve more sustainable production systems. The findings are presented separately for the kiwifruit and sheep/beef sector. The report concludes with recommendations for transdisciplinary engagement among the ARGOS objectives. Overall the current set of ARGOS social data for the kiwifruit sector suggests that, while there is great similarity among the panels, the Organic panel demonstrates the greatest number of distinctive characteristics. The assessment of difference among kiwifruit panels reflects survey results (six variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (more obviously distinctive characteristics attributed to the Organic panel) and causal map analysis (Organic orchardists listed a greater number of factors). The other surveyed data and the sketch maps do not show many panel differences. These kiwifruit results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, orchard management approaches, scope of control, and on- and off-farm relationships. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Gold orchardists were closer to the Organic panel than the Kiwigreen panel (more double arrows and total connections in causal maps; a greater readiness to assume risk in the interviews). The sheep/beef results show that, once the many similarities among sheep/beef farmers are taken into account, the Organic panel again demonstrated several distinctive characteristics compared to the Conventional and Integrated panels. This assessment similarly reflects survey results (14 variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (distinctive response of Organic panel to several topics of enquiry) and causal map analysis (Organic farmers had a greater number of important factors). In addition, both the sketch map and the causal map data indicated that location explained some of the variation among farmers. The sheep/beef results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, on- and off-farm relationships, production system management and responses to innovation and risk. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Integrated farmers were more similar to the Organic than the Conventional ones. Finally, the report interprets the findings in terms of their potential to differentiate the panels on the basis of social dimensions. While the literature shows at least 15 potential bases for social differentiation between panels, our results support 12 of these. Of these there is six (community; grower networks; craft orientation; sense of place; grower stress and wellbeing; identity) for which there evidence for subtle to moderate differentiation while the remaining six (commercial and economic orientation; learning and expertise; symbolic ‘look’ of the farmscape; indicators of on-farm processes; positioning towards nature/environment; farm management approaches) provide a stronger base for differentiation among panels. In its conclusion, the report identifies key indicated themes that have potential for transdisciplinary discussion, including: audit and market access, resilience, and intensification.

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  • Sustainable management of natural assets used for tourism in New Zealand : a classification system, management guidelines and indicators

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Ward, J. C.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Nature and recreation based activities are significant components of the tourism industry in New Zealand. Growing numbers of visitors, and the needs of statutory resource managers, have placed pressure on tourism operators and providers to effectively avoid, remedy and/or mitigate existing and potential effects of tourism. At the same time there is also pressure to provide a quality visitor experience and to operate tourism enterprises profitably. Although a major review and investigation into the environmental effects associated with the tourism sector was carried out by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment (PCE) in 1997, standard tools for identifying and monitoring visitor impacts, and generic guidelines for management, are currently not widely applied or available to many operators. In this report we develop and apply a framework for the integrated management of natural assets used for tourism. We concentrate in particular on developing three related products: 1) a simple and applied tourism asset classification framework; 2) a framework for sustainable management of natural assets incorporating management and monitoring guidelines; and 3) a set of Environmental Performance Indicators for Natural Assets used for Tourism consistent with other sets being developed by the Ministry for the Environment.

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  • Managing energy use in tourism businesses - survey results

    Becken, S.; Carboni, A.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    In partnership with the Tourism Industry Association an online survey was sent via email to all members recorded in the TIA database. As part of a three-year project on Tourism & Oil, the responses of tourism businesses to energy costs and carbon emissions were analysed. Results from this study will be relevant for energy reduction initiatives by the Tourism Industry Association and for carbon footprinting projects by the Ministry of Tourism. This energy survey will also inform other objectives in the wider Tourism & Oil project, for example the construction of a Tourism General Equilibrium Model and the development of adaptation measures for tourism businesses. This study will increase our understanding of the energy sources used by tourism businesses and measures that have already been implemented to reduce energy consumption.

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  • Cruise ship tourism in Akaroa: a social carrying capacity perspective

    Lama, A. K.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This project is being undertaken to assess the impact of cruise ship visits on Akaroa Township through a Tourism Carrying Capacity (TCC) Study, with particular reference to assessing the social carrying capacity of the visitors in Akaroa Township. The aim of this study is to undertake, assess and provide an overview of the broader perception of the SCC of cruise tourism in Akaroa. The objectives are; to explore information regarding cruise ship tourism in Akaroa, to conduct surveys of visitors on the perception of their experiences during the peak visitor period (December and January), to compare the experiences of the visitors on cruise and non-cruise days and on different trip types, to assess the impacts of cruise tourism on SCC, to provide recommendations for the long term management of cruise ship tourism in Akaroa.

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  • Strategic Management

    Ritson, N.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This free textbook introduces the reader to the different approaches and schools within strategic thinking as well as the tools used to investigate the strategic environment surrounding a business. Preface: This compendium provides a comprehensive overview of the most important topics covered in a strategic course at the Bachelor, Masters or MBA level. The intention is to supplement renowned strategy textbooks. This compendium is designed such that it follows the structure of a typical strategy course. Throughout this compendium theory is supplemented with examples and illustrations.

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  • The Proceedings of the Lincoln College Farmers' Conference 1956

    McCaskill, L. W.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The published proceedings of the 6th Lincoln College Farmers' Conference, held in 1956.

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  • The Proceedings of the Lincoln College Farmers' Conference 1962

    McArthur, A. T. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The published proceedings of the 12th Lincoln College Farmers' Conference, held in 1962.

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  • The Proceedings of the Lincoln College Farmers' Conference 1959

    McCaskill, L. W.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The published proceedings of the 9th Lincoln College Farmers' Conference, held in 1959.

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