18 results for Book, ResearchCommons@Waikato

  • Guidebook for Pre-conference North Island Field Trip ‘Ashes and Issues’, 28-30 November, 2008

    Lowe, David J.

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Guidebook for Pre-conference North Island, New Zealand Field Trip ‘Ashes and Issues’, 28-30 November, 2008. The route goes progressively towards the locus of the most recently active volcanic centres in central North Island. Concepts of upbuilding pedogenesis in tephra-mantled terrains will be discussed. Topical issues relating to soil and water quality and land management of intensive horticulture, pastoral farming (especially dairying), plantation forestry and C budgeting and modelling, and municipal effluent disposal by land treatment, will be considered as well. The declining quality of water in lakes in the Rotorua region and in Lake Taupo (mainly as a result of increasing N and P), and large-scale land-use conversions from plantation forestry to dairy farming in the Taupo area, and implications, are examined on days 2 and 3 of the trip.

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  • My safety around dogs - English

    Carter, Jennifer; Swain, David (2008)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/968. Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/975. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/930. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/984. Obtain a copy of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/931. The Te Reo Maori version of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet will be available in 2009.

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  • Taku haumaru me te kurī - Te Reo Maori

    Carter, Jennifer; Swain, David (2008)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/968. Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/975. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/930. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/984. Obtain a copy of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/931. The Te Reo Maori version of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet will be available in 2009.

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  • Pleasure, profit and pain: Alcohol in New Zealand and the contemporary culture of intoxication

    McEwan, Brett James; Campbell, Maxine M.; Lyons, Antonia; Swain, David (2013)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    This book details the rich, complex and often contested role of alcohol in New Zealand society. It explores the three fundamental alcohol rights that continue to fight for dominance of the national drinking culture: the rights of individual drinkers to enjoy the pleasures of alcohol, the rights of society to protect itself from the harms of alcohol, and the rights of the alcohol industry to profit from the sale of a legal commodity. Historically, most of our intoxicated drinkers were adult males and drinking was typically separated from family, food and entertainment. With the sweeping social changes of the 1960s and 1970s, women and later young people, increasingly engaged with alcohol. A growing proportion of these groups have since joined men in a culture of intoxication, or binge drinking culture as it is often termed. New Zealand is not alone however, in having a culture of intoxication, with similar alcohol consumption patterns evident in many other developed nations. This book identifies the local and the global influences that have affected New Zealand society (and much of the rest of the world) since the late 1900s and details how these influences have sustained the contemporary culture of intoxication. Finally, this book will propose that to implement effective change to our national drinking culture, the rights of the alcohol industry and of individual drinkers will need to be pulled back from the liberal excesses that the 1980s and 1990s provided. A re-balancing is required in order to strengthen and sustain society’s right to protect itself from alcohol-related harm.

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  • Ohaaki: A power station on Maori land

    Stokes, Evelyn (2003)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    This paper is about a geothermal power station called Ohaaki, constructed over the period 1982-1989 on Maori land close by Te Ohaaki Marae and the ancestral papakainga of Ngati Tahu. This is a personal account of the impact of this project on Ngati Tahu rather than a history of the construction of the power station.

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  • Adding some TEC-variety: 100+ activities for motivating and retaining learners online

    Khoo, Elaine G.L.; Bonk, Curtis J. (2014)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    The TEC-VARIETY framework purposely takes into account current technology trends and attempts to stimulate their use in pedagogically effective ways. As such, it rests at the intersection of such exciting educational affordances brought about by emerging learning technologies, intrinsic as well as extrinsic motivation-related theories, and the rapidly shifting perspectives on teaching and learning philosophies and approaches. For online educators who are frustrated with never-ending waves of technology and the lack of training on how to effectively use them in their courses, we hope that the TEC-VARIETY framework can offer a ray of sunshine and a new beginning for online educators worldwide. As part of that hope, such educators might find activities and strategies that they can make use of to nurture engagement and success online. These strategies can breathe life into current classes and programs that are failing to engage their learners. They tap into learners’ inner resources and desires to learn and grow toward a better future. At the same time, they can invite the global sharing of ideas and knowledge as part of a worldwide community or family of learners.

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  • Guidebook for ‘Land and Lakes’ field trip, New Zealand Society of Soil Science Biennial Conference, Rotorua

    Lowe, David J. (2006-11-01)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Welcome to Rotorua. The trip today (28th November, 2006) has twin themes: “Land and soil in the making” and “Land and soil management for cleaner water”. It offers an opportunity for participants to ‘peep behind the scenes’ at the wonderful volcanic landscapes, ash layers, soils, and waters of the Lake Rotorua−Lake Okaro−Lake Rerewhakaaitu areas in the Rotorua region. We hope the trip will be an informative, interesting and enjoyable day out with something for everyone. We will look at the linkages between soils and water and show how science and society are working together to understand and reduce the impacts of municipal, farming and forestry activities on our environment. Multiple layers of tephras, clear examples of buried soil horizons, and three remarkable soil profiles will be seen. Soil and environmental scientists, foresters, tephrochronologists (volcanic ash specialists), and volcanologists will join forces with local farmers and others to give us their perspectives at various stops during the trip.

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  • Guidebook for Pre-conference North Island Field Trip A1 ‘Ashes to Issues’, 28-30 November, 2008

    Lowe, David J. (2008-11-01)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Welcome to New Zealand or Aotearoa – „Land of the long lingering day [twilight]‟ – and to our three-day pre-conference North Island field trip „Ashes and Issues‟. We trust your stay in New Zealand is both informative and friendly and there is something for everyone on the trip. The itinerary in brief and a map of the North Island showing the main scientific stops are shown above. At the time of guidebook preparation, we have a group of 23, including four students, on the tour with participants from Japan, Taiwan, USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand. The tour leaders are Prof David Lowe (Univ. of Waikato, Hamilton) and Dr Haydon Jones (Scion Research, Rotorua). Assistant leader is Prof Paul McDaniel (Univ. of Idaho, Moscow), on leave at the Univ. of Waikato July-December, 2008. We offer a warm welcome to you all. Because we have considerable distances to travel (especially Day 3), as well as a range of stops planned, we will need to leave the hotel at 8.00 am each day.

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  • Kaupapa rangahau: A reader. A collection of readings from the Kaupapa Māori Research workshops series.

    (2015)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    This reader ‘Kaupapa Rangahau’ is a collation of a range of articles related to Kaupapa Māori theory and research. It has been developed as a resource for the Kaupapa Māori workshops provided to Māori researchers through the collaborative efforts of Te Kotahi Research Institute and Waikato-Tainui College for Research and Development. The workshops have provided training in the area of Kaupapa Māori theory, methodology, methods and research proposal development to over 150 participants over the past two years.

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  • Once despised now desired: innovative land use and management of multilayered Pumice Soils in the Taupo and Galatea areas, central North Island, New Zealand

    Lowe, David J.; Balks, Megan R.; Laubscher, Nadia (2014-12-02)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    The tour brings together innovative land use change and management associated with dairy farming, and land-based effluent disposal, on weakly weathered and multi-layered, glass-rich, Pumice Soils (Vitrands) in the Taupo and Galatea areas. These changes and their effects, together with environmental and sustainability issues, form a central theme of the trip. Four main stops are planned, two before lunch and two after: (1) plantation pine-to-dairy farm conversion and impacts, the Taupo eruption deposits (AD 232 ± 10) and the Taupo soil, at Tahorakuri; (2) overview of the application of secondary-treated wastewater and nitrogen leaching and uptake, Rotokawa; (3) a sequence of five Holocene tephras and buried soils, including Kaharoa eruption deposits (AD 1314 ± 12) and the Galatea soil, Smeith Farm, Murupara; and (4) enhancing pasture production on ‘new’ soils formed by excavating and mixing (‘flipping’) buried soil horizons (paleosols) on Smeith’s farm. During the trip − which helps mark Waikato University’s 50th anniversary − we will see a spectacular range of volcanic and fluvial landscapes and deposits, together with impacts of tectonism, as we traverse the famous Taupo Volcanic Zone ((TVZ) in the central volcanic region. Landforms and soils dominated by tephras (volcanic ash) become generally younger towards the loci of volcanic activity. Extensive areas of soils have been formed repeatedly from the fragmental eruptive products of the two most frequently active and productive rhyolite (silica-rich) volcanic centres known, namely Taupo and Okataina. Thus soil stratigraphy and upbuilding pedogenesis form a second theme on the trip. The first part of the guidebook thus contains sections including (i) volcanism and its products, (ii) Quaternary volcanism in TVZ including deposits erupted recently from Taupo and Tarawera volcanoes from which Pumice Soils have been formed, (iii) tephra-derived soils including Pumice Soils, their classification, special problems, and (low) fertility, (iv) allophane and its formation, and (v) the interplay between geological and pedological processes relating to tephras (upbuilding pedogenesis). The second part then comprises notes and illustrations pertaining to each stop (note that figure and table numbers are self-contained at each stop, or not used). Broad overviews of the region’s geology are covered by Leonard et al. (2010), and the soils are outlined by Rijkse and Guinto (2010) and S-map. Further compilations of data are available in tour guides by Lowe (2008) and Lowe et al. (2010).

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  • Intra-conference and Post-conference Tour Guides, International Inter-INQUA Field Conference and Workshop on Tephrochronology, Loess, and Paleopedology

    Lowe, David J. (1994-02-01)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand consists of a cluster of islands, the three largest being North, South, and Stewart, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. They have a total land area of about 270 000 km2 (similar to that of the British Isles or Japan). The islands are the small emergent parts of a much larger submarine continental mass (Fig. 0.1) that was rafted away from Australia and Antarctica by sea-floor spreading in the proto-Tasman Sea between 85 and 60 Ma. Much of this New Zealand subcontinent is a remnant of the former eastern margin of Gondwanaland, the ancient southern supercontinent. The mainland islands form a long, narrow, NE-SW trending archipelago bisected by an active, obliquely converging, boundary between the Australian and Pacific lithospheric plates (Fig. 0.2), which has evolved over the last 25 million years (Kamp 1992). The plate boundary is marked by active seismicity and volcanic arcs, illustrating New Zealand's position as part of the Circum-Pacific Mobile Belt -the so-called "Pacific Ring of Fire". The NE-SW trend of the modem plate boundary cuts across mainly NW-SE oriented structural features inherited from earlier (mid-Cretaceous) rifting events.

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  • Clay mineralogy of tephras and associated paleosols and soils, and hydrothermal deposits, North Island [New Zealand]

    Lowe, David J.; Percival, H.J. (1993-07-01)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Tour themes and itinerary The tour centres on the occurrence and genesis of clay minerals, especially allophane, halloysite, and ferrihydrite, associated with both Quaternary rhyolitic airfall tephra (volcanic ash) deposits and volcanogenic alluvium, and on mineralisation and thermal activity in hydrothermal fields. After a brief overview of the basaltic volcanoes of Auckland City, our route essentially traverses the Central Volcanic Region by way of a large loop with overnight stops at Rotorua (2 nights), Tokaanu, and Auckland (Fig. 0.1). We have around five stops planned for each day (including lunch), three of these being scientific stops except on Day 4 when we have only one scientific stop because of the need to travel greater distances. Our route takes us progressively towards the locus of the most recently active volcanic centres of the Central Volcanic Region, and so the surficial tephra deposits and buried paleosols become successively younger and generally less weathered: tephras at the Mangawara section (Day 1) span c. 1 Ma; at Tapapa (Day 2), c. 140 ka; at Te Ngae (Day 2), c. 20 ka; and at De Bretts, c. 10 ka, and Wairakei, c. 2 ka (Day 3). Interspersed with these tephra-paleosol sections are stops to examine an allophane-halloysite soil drainage (leaching) sequence on volcanogenic alluvium (Day 1), hydrothermal activity and mineral deposits at Whakarewarewa (Day 2) and Waiotapu (Day 3), and pure ferrihydrite seepage deposits in Hamilton (Day 4). Following introductory and detailed background review material, the tour guide has been arranged on a day-by-day basis and includes an outline of the route and stops, and several pages describing the stratigraphy, mineralogy, chemistry, and pedology of the deposits or features at each of the main stops. We will attempt to point out and describe geological and other features as appropriate during travel periods. Other activities Examples of New Zealand's distinctive fauna and flora, including kiwis and tuataras, will be seen at close quarters at Rainbow Springs (Day 2), where we will also enjoy an agricultural farm show. In Rotorua we will partake in a Maori hangi (steam-cooked feast) and concert including traditional dance forms (hakas) and songs (Day 2). In Tokaanu, hot pools will be available to relax in near the slopes of Mt Tongariro (Day 3). At Waitomo, we will visit the Waitomo Cave and in Hamilton spend a short time at the Waikato Museum of Art and History (Day 4). Finally, the tour will conclude with a farewell dinner in Auckland.

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  • Digital Smarts: Enhancing learning and teaching

    (2015)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Why 'Digital Smarts'? We chose digital smarts as the key phrase for the book because we have appropriated it to encompass the following ●an emphasis on pedagogy ●agency, or students' active participation in their learning. This includes any learner in early childhood through to secondary and tertiary learning contexts where learners exercise agency over the focus of learning, generate content and resources, and are encouraged to provide feedback and feedforward to each other ●creativity ●risk-taking, experimentation, inquiry ●challenging the publishing status quo—managing our own workload, using open review processes, viewing assessment as learning, posing challenges for teachers and seeking open access to research publications. We think it is important for digital technologies to be seen as the servants of learning, providing opportunities for all learners to be adaptive help-seekers and agents of their own lives as they appropriate these technologies as cultural tools.

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  • The legacy of Ngatoroirangi: Maori customary use of geothermal resources

    Stokes, Evelyn (2000)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Geothermal activity has always been regarded as a significant traditional resource among Maori communities of the Bay of Plenty, Rotorua and Taupo districts. The principal settlements of the tribes of Te Arawa, Ngati Tahu and Ngati Tuwharetoa were associated with geothermal areas. Outside the Taupo Volcanic Zone there were numerous other hot springs which were also highly valued by Maori. Areas of surface geothermal activity all have some traditions, cultural and historical associations for local tribes. Geothermal resources were used in various ways.

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  • Hamilton Parents Centre 1957-2003: A sociological history

    Morgans, Blair; Snape, Holly; Swain, David (2004)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    This is a "sociological history" of Hamilton Parents Centre and as such presents the stories' of Hamilton Parents Centre organised both chronologically and thematically. These stories are broadly of two kinds: those represented in words and pictures in the archive materials made available to us by Hamilton Parents Centre, and those shared with us this year in individual and group interviews by (mostly) women who in the past were or at present are involved with Parents Centre (and in some instances with the Federation of New Zealand Parents Centres). This sociological history is also a case study, and we believe it is a "normal" or "typical" case'. Hamilton Parents Centre can be regarded as a single entity, one of a number of such specific entities (the other Parents Centres) and more generally one of a much larger number of entities, voluntary community-based social service and advocacy organisations . We argue that Hamilton has, over the life of Hamilton Parents Centre, been reasonably representative of New Zealand communities, of urban New Zealand which is and has for a long while been the demographically predominant New Zealand. We also take the view that Hamilton Parents Centre stands for a particular kind of organisation of great importance to the history and development of the human services sector here in New Zealand: community-based, staffed largely by volunteers (but not necessarily thereby amateurs), largely self-funded, identifying new or neglected needs, developing new services, welcoming and being assisted by appropriate professionals but not unduly beholden to them, implicitly (and sometimes explicitly) criticising the status quo

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  • My safety around dogs: Guidelines for safe interaction between children (about 8-9yrs) and pet dogs - English

    Carter, Jennifer; Swain, David (2008)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/968. Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/975. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/930. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/984. Obtain a copy of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/931. The Te Reo Maori version of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet will be available in 2009.

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  • Taku haumaru me te kurī: He aratohu mō te haumaru i waenga i te tamariki (8-9 pea ngā tau) me te kurī - Te Reo Maori

    Carter, Jennifer; Swain, David (2008)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/968. Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/975. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/930. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/984. Obtain a copy of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/931. The Te Reo Maori version of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet will be available in 2009.

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  • Keeping our children safe around dogs: Guidelines for safe interaction between children and pet dogs - English

    Carter, Jennifer; Swain, David (2008)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/968. Obtain a copy of the children’s leaflet (about 5-6yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/975. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/930. Obtain a copy of the children’s booklet (about 8-9yrs) in Te Reo Maori from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/984. Obtain a copy of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet in English from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/931. The Te Reo Maori version of the parents’/caregivers’ booklet will be available in 2009.

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