9 results for Book, Use commercially

  • Transport Transitions in New Zealand: A scoping study

    Ford, Rebecca; Doering, Adam; Stephenson, Janet (2014)

    Book
    University of Otago

    As concerns about energy security and green house gas emissions become more pronounces, establishing an energy-efficient low-carbon transport system has increasingly become a priority for businesses, government and communities. This report sets out to discover the range of agents conducting transport initiatives aligned with these goals, and how their actions might relate to more widespread transition of the transport system.

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  • Media Studies 101

    Pearson, Erika; Taffel, Sy; Nicholls, Brett; Wengenmeir, Martina; Chin, Khin-Wee; Phillips, Hazel; Snowden, Collette; Madill, Bernard; Ross, Jane; Gallagher, Sarah; Fisher, Thelma; Kabir, Shah Nister J.; Ceuterick, Maud; Mettner, Hannah; Urbano, Massimiliana (2014)

    Website
    University of Otago

    Led by Erika Pearson with assistance from Bernard Madill (both from the University of Otago) and featuring contributors from Massey University, University of Canterbury and University of South Australia. "Inspired by similar projects around the world, and supported by funding from Creative Commons, the Media Text Hack Group sought to act as 'curators' of the vast array of information about media and communication, and drew together examples specific to the region ... This first release represents a core of work based on the common curricula of media and communication studies programs across the region. It is hoped that future versions will develop and expand these areas, as well as take advantage of new tools of collaboration and sharing. All are welcome to take, use, recycle and adapt the material under the Creative Commons Attribution licence"--Media release, 13 Feb. 2013

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  • Energy Cultures: Implications for Policymakers

    Barton, Barry; Blackwell, Sally; Carrington, Gerry; Ford, Rebecca; Lawson, Rob; Stephenson, Janet; Thorsnes, Paul; Williams, John (2013-02)

    Book
    University of Otago

    The Energy Cultures research project (2009-2012) was planned to help inform policy making related to residential energy use and energy efficiency in New Zealand. It sought, in part, to help address the difficulties faced by government agencies in achieving the economically viable potential for residential electricity savings. In particular, the project set out to examine household energy behaviour in relation to space heating and hot water heating, which together account for around 60% of household energy use. The programme was designed as a number of discrete research projects, linked together by the Energy Cultures conceptual framework. This report presents the policy implications of the multiple findings of that research.

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  • Energy Transitions: Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS)

    Ford, Rebecca; Stephenson, Janet; Brown, Nicholas; Stiehler, Willie (2014)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Home Energy Management (HEM) offers the potential to help manage peak electricity demand and network constraints – crucial for efficient infrastructure – yet to date is underdeveloped in New Zealand. This presentation provides an overview of current and future HEM capabilities, and some of the factors that might affect uptake of such systems in New Zealand. Four key characteristics of HEM systems are identified and used to guide data collection about HEM technologies currently on the market, which are shown to break into 8 different groupings based on their energy management capabilities. These systems offer demand management through feedback and behaviour prompts, remote control, demand response, and scheduling. Additionally, emerging technologies point to a new wave of HEM systems that better leverage smart grid infrastructure. However, uptake and use of such technologies is not guaranteed, and we discuss factors that may influence the success of home energy management.

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  • Pleasure, profit and pain: Alcohol in New Zealand and the contemporary culture of intoxication

    McEwan, Brett James; Campbell, Maxine M.; Lyons, Antonia; Swain, David (2013)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    This book details the rich, complex and often contested role of alcohol in New Zealand society. It explores the three fundamental alcohol rights that continue to fight for dominance of the national drinking culture: the rights of individual drinkers to enjoy the pleasures of alcohol, the rights of society to protect itself from the harms of alcohol, and the rights of the alcohol industry to profit from the sale of a legal commodity. Historically, most of our intoxicated drinkers were adult males and drinking was typically separated from family, food and entertainment. With the sweeping social changes of the 1960s and 1970s, women and later young people, increasingly engaged with alcohol. A growing proportion of these groups have since joined men in a culture of intoxication, or binge drinking culture as it is often termed. New Zealand is not alone however, in having a culture of intoxication, with similar alcohol consumption patterns evident in many other developed nations. This book identifies the local and the global influences that have affected New Zealand society (and much of the rest of the world) since the late 1900s and details how these influences have sustained the contemporary culture of intoxication. Finally, this book will propose that to implement effective change to our national drinking culture, the rights of the alcohol industry and of individual drinkers will need to be pulled back from the liberal excesses that the 1980s and 1990s provided. A re-balancing is required in order to strengthen and sustain society’s right to protect itself from alcohol-related harm.

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  • Campus climate for students with diverse sexual orientations and/or gender identities at the University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand

    Treharne, Gareth; Beres, Melanie; Nicolson, Max; Richardson, Aimee; Ruzibiza, Christian; Graham, Katie; Briggs, Hahna; Ballantyne, Neill (2016)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Background & aims: Despite increasingly positive attitudes towards diversity in sexual orientation and gender identity, university students who identify as lesbian/gay/takatāpui, bisexual/pansexual, trans, asexual, questioning, and/or queer* (LGBTAQ) continue to experience harassment and discrimination on campus to a great extent than students who identify as heterosexual and a binary gender (HAABG). Previous studies, predominantly conducted in the United States, have reported that LGBTAQ students experience harassment, threats, and even physical assault on campus, most commonly from other students. Because of this harassment, it is not surprising that some LGBTAQ students do not disclose their identity on campus for fear of negative consequences. Studies also suggest that support services can act to reduce the occurrence, and the impact, of harassment and discrimination. The main aim of this project was to survey the campus experiences of students attending the University of Otago and to compare the views and experiences of LGBTAQ students and HAABG students in terms of: forms of harassment and discrimination they have faced; fear for safety; concealment of sexual orientation and/or gender identity; views on which groups of people within the LGBTAQ umbrella they perceive as facing harassment on campus; views on organisational responses to LGBTAQ issues; views of the OUSA Queer* Support service; and views on the overall campus climate including climate within classes. Methods & sample: Students registered at the University of Otago were sent an email containing a link to the online survey in April 2014. A total of 1,234 respondents fully completed the survey and were included in the final analysis. Within the total sample, 66.5% of respondents identified as female, 32.5% identified as male, and 1.1% identified as ‘other’ (including trans, genderqueer, and agender individuals). Over two-thirds of respondents identified as HAABG (n = 878, 71.2%), whereas over a quarter (n = 356, 28.8%) identified as LGBAQ and/or reported their gender identity as ‘other’. The survey contained 41 fixed-response questions enquiring about demographics, ‘outness’, experiences of discrimination and harassment, views on likelihood of harassment for groups within the LGBTAQ community, campus responses and support service, and overall campus climate. Comments on respondents’ experiences and the survey itself were requested in two questions at the end of the survey. Results: There were significant difference between LGBTAQ and HAABG respondents on many of the questions. Over a fifth of LGBTAQ respondents reported being out to friends and family (21.4%) and around one in 10 (11.3%) were not out to anyone, compared to the majority of HAABG respondents (87.2%) reporting they were out to all people. Half of LGBTAQ respondents (50.3%) reported they had concealed their sexual orientation/gender identity to avoid intimidation and 31.6% reported they had also avoided disclosing their sexual orientation/gender identity to University staff due to fear of negative outcomes. Most respondents reported they had not been denied opportunities due to their sexual orientation/gender identity (95.9% for LGBTAQ and 98.1% for HAABG) but over 10% of the LGBTAQ respondents reported having felt fearful for their physical safety due to their sexual orientation/gender identity compared to 3.7% of HAABG respondents. A quarter of the LGBTAQ respondents reported experiencing harassment as a result of their sexual orientation/gender identity compared to 5.8% of HAABG respondents. Over 20% of LGBTAQ respondents reported being subjected to derogatory remarks compared to 4.1% of HAABG respondents. Nearly one in six LGBTAQ respondents had received direct or indirect threats (compared to 2.2% of HAABG respondents), and 1.7% had been assaulted (compared to 0.2% of HAABG respondents). LGBTAQ respondents reported that harassment was most likely to occur in a public space on campus (12.6%), while walking on campus (11.2%), or in a hall of residence (8.1%). The most common source of harassment was other students for both LGBTAQ respondents (21.9%) and HAABG respondents (3.3%). The majority of all respondents agreed that the campus is friendly (89.8% of LGBTAQ, 93.2% of HAABG) and respectful (73.1% of LGBTAQ, 82.4% of HAABG). In relation to improvements across campus, respondents expressed disappointment that only two gender options are offered on many University surveys and forms. Respondents also suggested that having more staff LGBTAQ role models and additional support and education for students in residential halls. The majority of all respondents reported they would feel comfortable using gender neutral bathrooms (78.7% of LGBTAQ, 64.6% of HAABG). In relation to support services, around three quarters of respondents agreed that there are visible resources on queer* issues and concerns at the University of Otago and two-thirds of respondents agreed that the OUSA Queer* Support service is inclusive, safe, and supportive. Conclusions & recommendations: The majority of students perceived the University of Otago campus to be friendly, respectful, and communicative, although perceptions were less positive among LGBTAQ students, who were also more likely to fear for their safety. LGBTAQ students were more likely to think there are not enough visible resources about queer* issues on campus but had more favourable perceptions of the OUSA Queer* Support service compared to HAABG students. Female LGBTAQ students were more likely to say they would access the OUSA Queer* Support service. This finding suggests that it may be beneficial to promote OUSA Queer* Support services specifically for students who are male or a non-binary gender. Students who are gay/lesbian/takatāpui and/or have non-binary gender identities were more likely to experience discrimination, fear for their safety, conceal their identities to avoid harassment, and had a less favourable perception of campus responses to harassment. Students with non-binary gender identities were more likely to have been denied opportunities, experienced threats of violence and threats to expose their identity, to have been harassed in a campus office, and had were less likely to have favourable views of campus in terms of friendliness, respectfulness, and communication. The OUSA Queer* Support service aims to provide an inclusive, visible, and responsive service and is using information from this survey in its work with LGBTAQ students and University staff to address harassment and other core issues such as availability of gender-neutral bathrooms. Future campus climate surveys will provide important monitoring of levels of discrimination and the success of efforts to support LGBTAQ students. The two key findings of this survey are that harassment is experienced by one in four LGBTAQ students at the University of Otago within a year, and HAABG students appear to underestimate the likelihood of this harassment. Discrimination and harassment leads around half of LGBTAQ students to conceal their sexual orientation and/or gender identity, with a third avoiding disclosing their sexual orientation and/or gender identity specifically to University staff to avoid negative consequences. Derogatory remarks in public on campus are the most common form of harassment reported by LGBTAQ students and female HAABG students, particularly in the evening, although harassment outside campus was also highlighted. Respondents also reported witnessing harassment but being fearful to intervene. These findings suggest LGBTAQ and HAABG students may benefit from workshops about skills to apply when witnessing or experiencing derogatory remarks or other forms of harassment. Additional advertising of the OUSA Queer* Support service is recommended via posters, social media, and in course resources. Wider efforts are also required to challenge the culture of discrimination towards LGBTAQ people through events to raise awareness throughout the year and in relevant venues, including residential halls.

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  • Digital Smarts: Enhancing learning and teaching

    (2015)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Why 'Digital Smarts'? We chose digital smarts as the key phrase for the book because we have appropriated it to encompass the following ●an emphasis on pedagogy ●agency, or students' active participation in their learning. This includes any learner in early childhood through to secondary and tertiary learning contexts where learners exercise agency over the focus of learning, generate content and resources, and are encouraged to provide feedback and feedforward to each other ●creativity ●risk-taking, experimentation, inquiry ●challenging the publishing status quo—managing our own workload, using open review processes, viewing assessment as learning, posing challenges for teachers and seeking open access to research publications. We think it is important for digital technologies to be seen as the servants of learning, providing opportunities for all learners to be adaptive help-seekers and agents of their own lives as they appropriate these technologies as cultural tools.

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  • Evolutions or Revolutions? Interaction and Transformation at the 'Transition' in Island Melanesia

    Cath-Garling, Stephanie (2017)

    Book
    University of Otago

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  • A short grammar of Urama

    Brown, Jason; Muir, A; Craig, K; Anea, K (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Urama (ISO: 639-3 kiw) is a language spoken primarily on Urama Island in Papua New Guinea. It is spoken in the Gulf Province, in the vicinity of Deception Bay, in the Era River Delta. Urama is part of the Kiwai language family, which is distributed along the south coast of Papua New Guinea. The Kiwai family in turn belongs to the larger Trans New Guinea stock.1 Within the Kiwai family, Urama belongs to the North-Eastern group, along with Arigibi, Gibaio, and Kope (also referred to as Gope) (Wurm 1973). The name ‘Urama’ is used to refer to the language, the ethnic group, and the island. A native Urama individual is termed Urama mere ‘Urama person’. Urama Island is in the Kikori district. Preliminary numbers for the 2011 census indicate the entire district has a population of 41,232. Official numbers of inhabitants on Urama Island are more difficult to obtain; however, Wurm (1971:139) has estimated the population of Urama speakers at around 1500. Foley (1986:233) estimated the population of North-Eastern Kiwai (presumably including Gibaio, Kope, and Urama, but not Arigibi, which Wurm & Hattori 1981 classify as a separate language²) at 3700 speakers, as has Wurm & Hattori (1981), and according to Ethnologue (Lewis et al. 2014, based on Foley’s 2011 estimates), there are 6000 speakers of North-East Kiwai (which includes Gibaio and Urama-Kope3 together). The adjacent areas speak various Kiwaian languages, and there is some mutual intelligibility between them. As Tok Pisin is one of the lingue franche of Papua New Guinea and is an official language, it is often the language of communication between those from other areas.

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