1,807 results for Book

  • No ordinary deal: Unmasking the Trans-Pacific Partnership Free Trade Agreement

    (2010)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement is no ordinary free trade deal - and this book is about much more than 'free trade'. The proposed agreement raises questions about the political future of independent nations, about sovereignty, democracy and indigenous self-determination, and, above all, the people's right to know what governments are doing. The TPPA is billed as an agreement fit for the twenty-first century, but no-one is sure what that means. The US sells the TPPA as the key to jobs and economic recovery (while protecting home markets); New Zealand sees is as a magic bullet to open the US dairy market; Australia hails it as a foundation stone for an APEC-wide free trade agreement. None of these arguments stacks up. Most participant countries are already heavily liberalised and deregulated, with numerous free trade agreements already in place. No-one really believes that US dairy markets will be thrown open to New Zealand or that China, India and Japan will sign onto a treaty they had no role in designing. In No Ordinary Deal, experts from Australia, New Zealand, the US and Chile examine the TPPA negotiations, and set out the costs of making concessions to the US simply to achieve a deal. They argue that obligations under the TPPA will intrude into core areas of government policy - such as financial regulation, pharmaceutical controls, foreign investment, food standards, culture and intellectual property laws. Above all, the proposed agreement locks our countries even deeper into a neoliberal model of global free markets - when even political leaders admit that this has failed.

    View record details
  • Interactions between tourists and the natural environment : impacts of tourist trampling on geothermal vegetation and tourist experiences at geothermal sites in Rotorua

    Ward, J. C.; Burns, B.; Johnson, V.; Simmons, D. G.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The main objective of this research was to evaluate tourist impacts on geothermal vegetation and to examine visitor's attitudes towards their impacts on vegetation. Two commercially operated sites near Rotorua were selected for research and a controlled trampling experiment was carried out on another geothermal site. Changes in vegetation cover were assessed using archival photographs and a sequence of aerial photographs. Short transects were applied to informal tracks in order to assess vegetation characteristics. Interviews and observations were used to record tourist behaviour. Overall the results show that the study sites provided a positive safe experience for visitors, which has minimal environmental effect. Geothermal vegetation is highly susceptible to trampling and the effects of trampling extend at least 30cm into the surrounding vegetation on either side of the tract. However, track management at the two sites appears to be adequate to ensure that there is only minimal damage to the surrounding vegetation. Regeneration of geothermal vegetation is likely to be slow because of the low productivity of these species, particularly after track compaction, but high soil temperatures are unlikely to encourage the spread of weed species into the surrounding vegetation. Management of the study sites may need to consider visitor education. The sites studied in this research can be used as an example of how to achieve access to sites while at the same time protecting the environment.

    View record details
  • Tourism in Rotorua : destination evolution and recommendations for management

    Simmons, D. G.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report provides a synthesis of seven separate reports into key aspects of tourism in Rotorua, and makes recommendations for the future management of the sector. The overall conclusion of this study is that tourism in Rotorua appears to be at an economically, environmentally and socially sustainable level at present. While future growth seems assured in the short-term there are a number of challenges in maintaining the long-term sustainability of the sector, and its role in regional social and economic development. The key areas of risk are those associated with the broader institutional, environmental and social elements of tourism management. The main thrust of the results from this research programme is that tourism planning needs to focus at a broad level. However, this report also has specific implications for the marketing of tourism some of which are noted here. Many of our recommendations therefore apply to those organisations with a broader societal and environmental mandate than tourism alone.

    View record details
  • Tourism and Maori development in Rotorua

    Tahana, N.; Grant, K. T. O. K.; Simmons, D. G.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of tourism and Maori development in Rotorua. The research process followed recognised protocols typical of culturally appropriate research and was sensitive to the historic context of Te Arawa in Rotorua. The research was based on three main sources of data: surveys of Maori tourism operators and Maori in the community, focus group discussion with Maori in the community, and interviews with hapu (sub-tribe) representatives. An historical account of the development of Maori in tourism provided context for the contemporary situation. Current Maori tourism operators cover a wide range of tourism businesses, most market themselves as Maori tourism businesses and the majority have been in operation less than 11 years. Most have relatively low financial turnover and nearly all feature some aspect of Maori culture in their tourism business. Maori respondents reported both good and bad effects from tourism, with some seeing tourism as promoting their culture and self-determination, and others seeing it as disempowering. There was similar ambivalence regarding Maori adaptation to tourism, however most respondents considered that Maori had adapted well to cultural performances and guiding. Generally, most respondents believed that the presentation of Maori culture has changed over time to cater for tourism demands but not in ways that significantly affects the practice of Maori culture. Maori respondents were divided in their opinion about the effect of tourism on their relationship with the environment especially with respect to Wairuatanga (spirituality) and Mana Whenua (authority over the land). Some were concerned about ownership and control of natural resources and were seeking greater input into their management. The presentation of Maori culture was seen by a majority of respondents as a misrepresentation. There were concerns about relevance, consultation, control and authenticity. The report makes a number of recommendations to encourage Maori tourism business.

    View record details
  • Frameworks: Contemporary Criticism on Janet Frame

    (2009)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Janet Frame’s work is notorious for the demands it makes on reader and critic. This collection of nine new essays by international Frame specialists draws on a range of critical frameworks to explore fresh ways of looking at Frame’s fiction, poetry, and autobiography. At the same time, the essays plug into the energy of Frame’s work to challenge our thinking within and beyond these frameworks. Frameworks offers a unique perspective on Frame studies today, showcasing its major concerns as well as heralding new Frame narratives for the decade ahead. Mindful of preceding Frame criticism, these essays use their contemporary vantage-point to recast seminal questions about the relationship between Janet Frame’s work and its critical contexts. Each of the essays makes a case for framing her work in a particular way, but all are characterized by self-reflexivity regarding their own critical practice and the relationship they assume between exegetical framework and Frame’s work. Underlying this practice, and contained within the pun of the title, are the elementary-sounding yet fundamental questions of Frame studies: How does Frame’s work work? And how do we work with her work?

    View record details
  • Intellectual property law : principles in practice

    Sumpter, Paul (2006)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Content: What does copyright protect? -- Copyright duration, ownership, special rights and the Internet -- Infringement and fair dealing -- Trade-marks : registered marks -- Passing off and the Fair Trading Act -- Patents -- Designs -- Confidential information.

    View record details
  • Maori and Mining

    Ruckstuhl, Katharina; Carter, Lyn; Easterbrook, Luke; Gorman, Andrew R; Rae, Hauauru; Ruru, Jacinta; Ruwhiu, Diane; Stephenson, Janet; Suszko, Abbey; Thompson-Fawcett, Michelle; Turner, Rachel (2013-09)

    Book
    University of Otago

    A multi-disciplinary study on how mining in New Zealand relates to and impacts on Maori - Iwi, hapu and whanau. The book covers a myriad of topics: resource extraction issues (including fracking), Treaty of Waitangi issues and rights, Legal rights and legislation covering mining in New Zealand, environmental and economic impacts, matauranga Maori, and the mechanics of mining - both off shore and land-based. There is also information on how interntional indigenous peoples have responded to mining.

    View record details