18 results for Book item, Otago University Research Archive

  • Work Related Musculoskeletal Pain and It’s Management

    McBride, David; Harcombe, Helen (2012-10)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    This is an ongoing project, your comments are welcome! david.mcbride@otago.ac.nz

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  • The digitisation of New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture

    Stanger, Nigel (2010-09-15)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Over the last 25 years, it has become possible to digitise and store an ever-increasing amount and variety of material. New Zealand has been one of the leaders in this area, with early initiatives such as the New Zealand Digital Library in the mid 1990s and the more recent Digital Content Strategy (http://www.digitalcontent.govt.nz/) promoting the idea of digitising New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture and making it available online. The government is committed to ensuring “New Zealand will be a world leader in using information and technology to realise its economic, environmental, social and cultural goals” (New Zealand Government, 2005, p. 4). They see New Zealanders as world leaders in using information and technology to build globally connected science and technology research communities. A key benefit of digitising research, cultural and heritage material is improved accessibility. It can be difficult and laborious to find specific items in traditional “hard copy” collections, whereas digital collections can be quickly and easily searched. They can also be made available via the Internet to a much larger audience than was previously possible. Digitisation also removes the access bottleneck arising from there being few physical copies of an item, as many people can access the same digital item simultaneously. Finally, digitisation helps us to preserve fragile historical material by reducing the need for physical access, and hence the likelihood of further physical damage or even loss. The need to store and manage digital collections of this nature has driven the development of digital libraries and repositories of various kinds, including the already mentioned New Zealand Digital Library. More recently, the launch of the government’s Digital Strategy in 2005 resulted in a nationwide proliferation of digital research repositories at New Zealand tertiary institutions, and ultimately led to the development of the Kiwi Research Information Service (KRIS) by the National Library of New Zealand. These developments have made New Zealand’s research readily available to the wider world. The same technologies used to build these institutional research repositories are also now being applied in non-academic areas. In 2006, the Cardrona Online Museum was launched, with the aim of storing and making available heritage materials relating to the Cardrona district. The launch attracted strong interest and has led into an ongoing project to develop a similar repository for the Central Otago region. In parallel, the Horowhenua Library Trust and Katipo Communications, Ltd., developed the Kete software to facilitate online community collaboration, and recently, the National Library began to harvest and index content from New Zealand Web sites for its DigitalNZ project. In this chapter, we will examine these developments, their impact on the dissemination of New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture, and look forward to future developments in this area.

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  • Building professionals and elevating the profession? The work of university-based teacher educators in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Berg, David. A. G.; Gunn, Alexandra C.; Hill, M. F.; Haigh, M. (2017)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Pre-Publication PROOF

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  • Graphical displays in eco-feedback: a cognitive approach

    Ford, Rebecca; Karlin, Beth (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Psychological research indicates that the provision of feedback is a key element in reinforcing and/or changing behavior, and whilst results from empirical studies on eco-feedback are positive, variation in findings suggests that its effectiveness may depend on both what information is provided and how it is presented. The design of graphical displays is an important component, but past display research has been primarily qualitative and exploratory. This paper introduces and tests a cognitive model of visual information processing applied to eco-feedback to evaluate differences in interpretation and preference between images. Participants were shown images that varied by number of data points as well as display features and were asked to interpret the images and report on image usability. Findings support the cognitive model, suggesting that eco-feedback displays appear to be more successful when they: (1) contain fewer data points; (2) employ data chunking; and/or (3) include pictures.

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  • Global Regulation of Nanotechnologies and Their Products in Medicine

    Moore, Jennifer (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Nanotechnology, an emerging technology, is creating innovative medicinal products for clinical use. The convergence of nanotechnologies with medicine is predicted to transform the health care sector, particularly pharmaceutical development. Jurisdictions, such as the European Union, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, have witnessed the launch of medical products containing nanomaterials. Many of the nanomedicines on the market, in clinical testing, or under regulatory review, promise to improve existing products and treat diseases more effectively. The purposes of this chapter are to (a) describe nanotechnology, in particular, its clinical applications; (b) analyze the application of medical products regulation in several jurisdictions (the European Union, United States, Australia, and New Zealand); and (c) assess the adequacy of this law for managing the potential risks posed by nanomedicines. There are gaps in the public health/health science evidence about the risks associated with nanomedicines, and there is concern that the novel properties of some nanomedicines will bring unforeseen human and environmental health and safety risks. Analysts project that, by 2014, the market for medical products containing nanomaterials will be US$18 billion per year. Given the predicted market for nanomedicines, and the growing evidence of their potential risks, it is important to have adequate regulation of these products to prevent adverse public health outcomes. Regulators and clinicians will need to consider the risks posed by some nanomedicines against the potential benefits to patients who are prescribed these products.

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  • The Impact of Therapeutic Jurisprudence on the New Zealand Coronial Jurisdiction

    Moore, Jennifer (2015)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Coroners in New Zealand can make recommendations that may reduce the chances of occurrence of similar deaths in the future. Coronial recommendations can have pro-therapeutic outcomes. The recommendations hold therapeutic promise for bereaved families by refocusing families towards prevention of similar deaths. However, when coroners' recommendations are not implemented, this has counter-therapeutic outcomes for the community who deserve remedial action, and for families who hoped for change. This chapter uses evidence from New Zealand's first empirical study of coroners' recommendations. An empirical approach is taken because therapeutic jurisprudence is concerned with assessing the law's impact on people, and the study of impacts often requires data about people's experiences of legal processes.

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  • The Logic of Terror

    Hokowhitu, Brendan (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Permission kindly granted to reproduce this chapter from Huia Publishers.

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  • Kant, Skepticism, and the Comparison Argument

    Vanzo, Alberto (2010)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Kant's writings on logic illustrate the comparison argument about truth, which goes as follows. A truth-bearer p is true if and only if it corresponds, or it agrees, with a portion of reality: the object(s), state(s) of affairs, or event(s) p is about. In order to know whether p agrees with that portion of reality, one must check if that portion of reality is as p states. Using the terms of the comparison argument, one must compare p with that portion of reality. This is impossible, because the only knowledge of reality we can have is in the form propositions, beliefs, or judgments, whose agreement with reality is as much in need of justification as the agreement of p with reality. Therefore, it is impossible to know which truth-bearers are true. In this paper, I reconstruct Kant's version of the comparison argument. I argue that, for Kant, the argument is sound only under the assumption of transcendental realism. Transcendental idealism avoids the sceptical consequences of the comparison argument.

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  • Credit Union Otago: Prospering in a competitive environment

    Sibbald, Alexander (2002)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    This case study presents an opportunity to identify and discuss operational management stratagies pursued by Credit Union Otago in particular, and the credit union industry in general, in their bid to survive and grow whilst aiming to achieve both economic and social objectives.

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  • Scalability of techniques for online geographic visualization of Web site hits

    Stanger, Nigel (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Extremely large data sets are now commonplace, and they are often visualized through the World Wide Web. Scalability of web-based visualization techniques is thus a key issue. This paper investigates the scalability of four representative techniques for dynamic map generation and display (e.g., for visualizing geographic sources of web site hits): generating a single composite map image, overlaying images on an underlying base map and two variants of overlaying HTML on a base map. These four techniques embody a mixture of different display technologies and distribution styles (three server-side and one distributed across both client and server). Each technique was applied to 20 synthetic data sets of increasing size, and the data set volume, elapsed time and memory consumption were measured. The results show that all four techniques are suitable for small data sets comprising a few thousand points, but that the two HTML techniques scale to larger data sets very poorly across all three variables.

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  • Practice and Performance as Research in the Arts

    (2011)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • The state in action: an insider’s view of how the state regulates the use of PGD with HLA tissue-typing in New Zealand

    Henaghan, Mark; Cleary, Thomas (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand the choice by intending parents to use reproductive technology is limited by legislation. This default restriction on the prospective parents’ procreative autonomy applies unless the use of the assisted reproductive procedure has been approved on the basis of guidelines or regulations. The task of creating these guidelines falls to a non-governmental advisory committee, the Advisory Committee on Assisted Reproductive Technology (ACART). This advisory committee is supposedly unconstrained by political considerations and, in theory, provides a forum for deliberative discussions on the ethical and social disagreements that surround the use of assisted reproductive technologies. This chapter provides an analysis, from the perspective of a member of ACART, of how the advisory committee functions in reality. It focuses specifically on the developments of guidelines controlling the use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tissue-typing, more commonly referred to as creating ‘saviour siblings’.

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  • International child abduction, intercountry adoption and international commercial surrogacy

    Henaghan, Mark; Ballantyne, Ruth (2014)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    The significance and complexities of both international child abduction and intercountry adoption led to the creation of two Hague Conventions. This chapter analyses the policy challenges facing the international aspects of The Hague Convention of 25 October 1980 on the Civil Aspects of International aspects of Child Abduction (the Abduction Convention) and The Hague Convention of 29 may 1993 on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (the Adoption Convention). Policy challenges for the Abduction Convention include the changing profile of the 'abducting parent'; domestic violence and the 'grave risk' exception; the 'child objection' exception; international interpretation inconsistencies; and the problem of non-signatory countries. Policy challenges faced by the Adoption Convention include the socio-economic realities of intercountry adoption and the resulting power imbalances; cultural and political differences; the difficulties of deciding what is in the best interests of children; problems of interpretation, implementation and enforcement; and the growing preference for international commercial surrogacy as a replacement for intercountry adoption. These policy issues highlight the need for these international conventions to constantly adapt and improve to meet the realities of international child abduction and intercountry adoption.

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  • Position and direction finding for exploration and mapping

    Goodwin, David (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Land Tenure: The Wide View

    Goodwin, David (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Grandparents who Care for Grandchildren

    Henaghan, Mark (2014)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Both in New Zealand and abroad, a social trend is emerging of grandparents taking on the responsibility of parenting their grandchildren. This chapter examines the different ways in which grandparents can come to be legally involved in their grandchildren’s lives and their position under New Zealand’s legislative and common law regimes. By way of contrast, the somewhat different position of grandparents in the United States is analysed with reference to the United States Supreme Court decision of Troxel v Granville. The chapter also discusses the fundamental importance of children’s voices and concludes with an examination of the practical support available to grandparents who find themselves raising their grandchildren.

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  • Neuroscience and the Law in New Zealand

    Henaghan, Mark; Rouch, Kate (2012)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    The New Zealand Court of Appeal has rejected evidence of neuroimaging to help juries assess the capacity of the accused in an insanity plea. This chapter says the Court of Appeal was right to do so because neuroimaging should not replace the role of the jury. The chapter explains; that neuroscience will help us better understand how the brain functions and what relationship there is between that functioning and how we make decisions. The chapter concludes that neuroscience will be helpful for insight into the human condition but cannot replace the moral choices of what we think is right or wrong or whether we should be culpable or should not be.

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  • Children and vulnerability

    Atwool, Nicola (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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