7 results for Book item, Use commercially

  • Skilled migration in and out of New Zealand: immigrants, workers, students and emigrants

    Bedford, R (2012-11-22)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Smart or Smarting: Student-library engagement in online distance education

    Ferrier-Watson, Anne (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This small-scale mixed methods study used surveys and focus groups to investigate the challenges faced by a cohort of online learners at the University of Waikato when seeking and referencing information for course assessments. The research also investigated the type of library support students value, as well as the barriers to their engagement with library information services. Findings revealed half the cohort reported they seldom used the library or library services during their degree; nearly three quarters of the cohort reported problems finding information; and over three quarters of the cohort did not seek help from the library. However, over three quarters of students reported they engaged with library referencing resources. This chapter makes observations about what it means to be ‘digitally smart’ in an academic library context, and suggests ways that library information services can be better provided and promoted to an information-saturated and time poor student audience.

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  • Digital Smarts: Enhancing learning and teaching [Introduction]

    Wright, Noeline; Forbes, Dianne Leslie (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This book is a partnership on many levels—between co-editors, with and among the other chapter authors, external, international reviewers, and eventually with you, the book’s readership. Our colleagues have also had to trust us in the mentoring, leadership and fruition of this project. We also hope that the work is trusted in the sense of having a quality assurance process that stands up as rigorous and befitting an academic text. We will address that aspect in more detail later in this introduction. Partnership, trust and integrity are implicit in any edited book development that grows from within a shared context such as ours, the University of Waikato’s Faculty of Education.

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  • "It's about the relationships that we build": iPad-supported relational pedagogy (Ngā Hononga) with young children

    Khoo, Elaine G.L.; Merry, Rosina; Bennett, Timothy; MacMillan, Nadine (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Although iPads have gained much attention and are being increasingly adopted into educational practices, concerns exist as to the suitability and extent of their use with and by young children. This chapter reports on the findings of a qualitative study exploring iPad use in the sustaining and extending of relationships in an early childhood education and care centre in New Zealand. Guided by the notion of a relational pedagogy, espoused in Te Whāriki, the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, the research involved collaborations with two early childhood teachers and children at the centre to obtain perspectives of teachers, young children and their parents/caregivers regarding iPad adoption and use. The findings highlight the potential of using iPads to support and further develop young children’s relationships with people, places and objects within their immediate contexts, which are underpinned importantly by a clear teacher awareness, adoption of and being informed by a relational pedagogy perspective. This has implications for how teachers can be supported to use the iPad to create meaningful and relevant teaching and learning experiences for and with young children.

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  • Children and vulnerability

    Atwool, Nicola (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Climate change and grape wine quality: a GIS approach to analysing New Zealand wine region

    Shanmuganathan, S; Narayanan, A; Sallis, P (2012-12-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The influences of seasonal climate variability on the phenological dynamics of certain terrestrial communities observed mostly since the mid‐20th century are seen as leading to unprecedented consequences (Richard, et al., 2009). The potential impacts of the phenomenon on the phenological development and in turn on the species composition of certain specific plant, insect, aquatic, bird and animal communities evolved in parallel over millions of years to form the existing “make‐up” of what is referred to as the “biodiversity” or “endemic species” of these natural habitats, are depicted as significant (Peñuelas and Estiarte, 2010). Scientific research results have revealed that the recent rapid climate change effects on these systems, more specifically during the last few decades, have resulted in presently being seen “temporal mismatch in interacting species”. Such ecological observations are even described as early vital signs of imminent “regime shifts” in the current base climate of these regions or latitudes (Schweiger, Settele, Kudrna, & Klotz, 2008: Saino, et al., 2009). On the other hand, climatologists portray the major cause for such rapid “climate regime shifts” and the consequent impacts on the survival of so called co‐evolved species, as anthropogenic (Anderson, Kelly, Ladley, Molloy, & Terry, 2011). For this reason, research relating to climate change impacts on vegetation spread over landscapes, phenological development and population dynamics of susceptible communities, in some cases even with potential threat for total extinction of “endangered species” under future climate change, has in recent years gained enormous momentum. In fact, this unprecedented attention has also drawn greater scrutiny and controversies at never seen before proportions in a way hindering any form of formal research on the phenomenon (Shanmuganathan & Sallis, 2010).

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  • The Fountain of Fish: Ontological Collisions at Sea

    Salmond, A (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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