104 results for Book item, 2006

  • Tax payments.

    Veal, J. (2006)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Provides a topical analysis of all the major areas of taxation as they are applied in New Zealand.

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  • Learning styles and adaptive ICT based learning environments.

    Kovacic, Z. (2006)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This chapter has two aims. First, to provide an overview of learning styles research and secondly, to provide an overview of research in adaptive hypermedia learning environment systems, those where different learning styles are considered and used to create a personalized learning environment.

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  • Maori land development.

    Harris, G. F.; Tipene, P. (2006)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Globalisation and amnesia: Han Shaogong's A Dictionary of Maqiao.

    Strongman, L. (2006)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Score more : essential academic skills for tertiary education.

    Maxwell, A. (2006)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This chapter examines what a report is and provides a step-by-step guide to what a report should contain and how it should be structured.

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  • Using academic readings strategically

    Hamer, J. (2006)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This chapter outlines a number of key strategies for quickly identifying the best readings that you will need to complete assignments to a high standard.

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  • Getting your assignment load under control.

    Adams, P.; Openshaw, R.; Trembath, V. (2006)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This chapter takes a closer look at assignment loads and how to keep them under control by planning ahead.

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  • Score more : essential academic skills for tertiary education.

    Hamer, J. (2006)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This chapter explains how you can tackle an assignment topic by understanding the place of your assignment within the broad design of your course, as well as understanding how to deconstruct your assignment topic.

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  • How to write an annotated bibliography.

    Maxwell, A. (2006)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This chapter explains what an annotated bibliography actually is, how to write one, and provides a number of model examples.

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  • Computer literacy: where are nurse educators on the continuum?

    Hanley, E. (2006)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Computers are becoming ubiquitous in health and education, and it is expected that nurses from undergraduate nursing programmes are computer literate when they enter the workforce. Similarly nurse educators are expected to be computer literate to model the use of information technology in their workplace. They are expected to use email for communication and a range of computer applications for presentation of course materials and reports. Additionally as more courses are delivered in flexible mode educators require more comprehensive computing skills, including confidence and competence in a range of applications. A cohort of nurse educators from one tertiary institution was surveyed to assess their perceived computer literacy and how they attained this. A questionnaire that covered seven domains of computer literacy was used to assess this. The results were illuminating and identified specific training needs for this group. Their perceived lack of skill with Groupwise email and the student database program are of concern as these are essential tools for nurse educators at this polytechnic.

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  • Computer literacy: where are nurse educators on the continuum?

    Hanley, E. (2006)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Computers are becoming ubiquitous in health and education, and it is expected that nurses from undergraduate nursing programmes are computer literate when they enter the workforce. Similarly nurse educators are expected to be computer literate to model the use of information technology in their workplace. They are expected to use email for communication and a range of computer applications for presentation of course materials and reports. Additionally as more courses are delivered in flexible mode educators require more comprehensive computing skills, including confidence and competence in a range of applications. A cohort of nurse educators from one tertiary institution was surveyed to assess their perceived computer literacy and how they attained this. A questionnaire that covered seven domains of computer literacy was used to assess this. The results were illuminating and identified specific training needs for this group. Their perceived lack of skill with Groupwise email and the student database program are of concern as these are essential tools for nurse educators at this polytechnic.

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  • Researching Identities: Impact of the Performance-Base Research Fund on the Subject(s) of Education

    Middleton, Sue (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    My argument begins by introducing key conceptual tools, applying them to the formative years of Education as a university subject. Second, I sketch a brief history of the subject in New Zealand in the 1980s and 1990s, emphasising its contradictory mandates as both academic and professional/clinical discipline. Third, I explore interviewees’ experiences and perspectives during and immediately after the quality evaluation process (Middleton, 2005a). The conclusion suggests ways the evaluation model might change to support (not penalise) Education’s dual mandate to enhance research capacity and outputs and to produce good practitioners for the teaching professions.

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  • "I my own professor": Ashton-Warner as New Zealand educational theorist, 1940-60.

    Middleton, Sue (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The invitation to contribute to this volume addressed me as a New Zealander who had written about how Sylvia Ashton-Warner's fantasies, theories, imagery, and life-history narratives threaded their way through my own. I had written of my youthful encounters with her work in Educating Feminists (Middleton 1993), in which I looked back on reading Spinster in 1960 at age thirteen and reflected on my teenage dreams of life as an artist and beatnik in Parisian cafes and garrets: confined to an Edwardian boarding school hostel in a provincial New Zealand town, I had plotted my escape to what Ashton-Warner described in Myself as "some bohemian studio on the Left Bank in Paris or over a bowl of wine in Italy, me all sophisticated and that, with dozens of lovers, paint everywhere and love and communion and sympathy and all that" (Myself, 212). When, in the early 1970s, I began secondary school teaching and read Teacher, that book built bridges between the frightening urgency of classroom survival, the enticing theories but alien classrooms described by American deschoolers and free-schoolers, and "what I believed myself to be when a girl on the long long road to school, a vagabond and an artist" (I Passed This Way, 307). As a young teacher I, too, had poured my impassioned soul into writing journals and poetry, painting, and playing the piano. Like Ashton-Warner, I had hoped that artistic self-expression could keep the mad woman in my attic at bay, for "asylums are full of artists who failed to say the things they must and famous tombs are full of those who did" (Incense to Idols, 169).

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  • The usability of open source software: analysis and prospects

    Nichols, David M.; Twidale, Michael B. (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Open source communities have successfully developed many pieces of software although most computer users only use proprietary applications. The usability of open source software is often regarded as one reason for this limited distribution. In this paper we review the existing evidence of the usability of open source software and discuss how the characteristics of open-source development influence usability. We describe how existing human-computer interaction techniques can be used to leverage distributed networked communities, of developers and users, to address issues of usability.

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  • From charity to 'not-for-profit': Changes in the role and structure of voluntary social service agencies

    Barnes, Jo (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter discusses findings from a study undertaken in 2001-02 on not-for-profit social service organisations in the regional city of Hamilton, a city of 166,000 people, in the context of changes in New Zealand welfare governance from 1984 to 1999 and inTampa, Florida, a city of just over 300,000 people, following the US welfare reforms of the Clinton administration.

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  • The developing field of technology education in New Zealand: The last twenty years

    Jones, Alister (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In the last twenty years technology education in New Zealand has found a place in research, teacher education and classroom practice. This paper traces the development of technology education as a field of study in compulsory education over the last twenty years and explores the curriculum development in the 1990s, the emerging research field during that time as well as teacher pre and in-service development. Figure 1 outlines the key aspects of development of technology education in New Zealand and highlights key features of curriculum, research and teacher education and shows the links between these different aspects in a timeline from 1985 to 2005.

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  • Appendix: The GL(n) pack Manual

    Broughan, Kevin A. (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This appendix is the manual for a set of functions written to assist the reader to understand and apply the theorems on GL(n, R) set out in the main part of the book. The software for the package is provided over the World Wide Web at http://www.math.waikato.ac.nz/~kab and is in the form of a standard Mathematica add-on package. To use the functions in the package you will need to have a version of Mathematica at level 4.0 or higher.

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  • Good intermediate-rank lattice rules based on the weighted star discrepancy

    Sinescu, Vasile; Joe, Stephen (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    We study the problem of constructing good intermediate-rank lattice rules in the sense of having a low weighted star discrepancy. The intermediate-rank rules considered here are obtained by “copying” rank-1 lattice rules. We show that such rules can be constructed using a component-by-component technique and prove that the bound for the weighted star discrepancy achieves the optimal convergence rate.

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  • Exploring new frontiers to generate an integrated definition of workaholism

    McMillan, Lynley H.W.; O’Driscoll, Michael P. (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In general, contemporary data indicate that workaholism represents a value system about the importance of working and achieving that certainly does not meet the scientific criteria for addiction, as it is associated with a similar quality of health and relationships to that of the rest of the adult population, and generally does not worsen over time (McMilIan and O'Driscoll, 2004). Interestingly, while the majority of workaholics appear to derive high enjoyment from their work and their leisure, it is their reluctance to utilize psychological `off-buttons' that potentially makes them a challenging group for management professionals (Machlowitz, 1980).

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  • Theoretical orientations in Physical Education Teacher Education

    Tinning, Richard (2006)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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