131 results for Book item, 2007

  • Private archives.

    Sanderson, K. A. (2007)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses the role of archivists and the practice of collecting private archives.

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  • The development of library service in New Zealand.

    Fields, A. J. (2007)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses the development of library service in New Zealand.

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  • Education: Information and library studies at The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand.

    Fields, A. J. (2007)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses the programmes taught within the Information and Library Studies section of the School of Information and Social Sciences.

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  • Beauty is in the eyes of the perceiver: Impact of affective stereotyping on the perception of out-group members' facial expressions.

    Philippot, P.; Yabar, Y.; Bourgeois, P. (2007)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Accident compensation in New Zealand: A review of a unique collective compensation scheme.

    Skinnon, J. (2007)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Discussion of New Zealand's ACC (accident compensation) system.

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  • Literacy and Thinking Tools for Science Teachers

    Whitehead, David (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Literacy and thinking tools, such as Venn diagrams, are construction tools for the mind. Just as carpenters use tools to construct a piece of furniture, literate thinkers learning science can use tools to construct new scientific understandings. Like tools used by a carpenter, some literacy and thinking tools are purpose-built for science education; Josephine used a Venn diagram tool because she wanted to compare her pet bird to a bald eagle. Just as a screwdriver is built to slot into the head of a screw and rotate it, you can use literacy and thinking tools for subject- and text-specific purposes. In this chapter, we examine some characteristics of literacy and thinking tools (Whitehead, 2001, 2004). A list of these tools, together with the chapters associ-ated with their use, is provided in Table 2:1.

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  • Maori and psychology: Indigenous psychology in New Zealand

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Maori have their own approaches to health and well-being, which stem from a world view that values balance, continuity, unity and purpose. The world view is not typically thought of as 'psychology', yet it is a foundation for shared understandings and intelligible action among Maori. Maori behaviours, values, ways of doing things and understandings are often not visible nor valued. However, through these opening years of the twenty-first century, psychologists are slowly turning their attention to addressing this invisibility with the explicit agenda of building 'indigenous psychologies'

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  • Sensation and perception

    Perrone, John A. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    One of the oldest and most difficult questions in science is how we are able to develop an awareness of the world around us from our senses. Topics covered under the title of, 'Sensation and perception' address this very question. Sensation encompasses the processes by which our sense organs (e.g. eyes, ears etc.) receive information from our environment, whereas perception refers to the processes through which the brain selects, integrates, organises and interprets those sensations. The sorts of questions dealt with by psychologists interested in this area include: 'how does visual information get processed by the brain?', 'how is it that I am able to recognise one face out of many many thousands?', and 'what causes visual illusions to occur?: Within New Zealand there are a number of researchers studying visual perception specifically and their research interests range from understanding the biological

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  • Sport and education: Sport in secondary schools for all or for some?

    Grant, Bevan C.; Pope, Clive C. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The place of sport in schools has always been controversial and struggled to gain legitimacy and acceptance as a part of the formal curriculum. While some commentators argue sport has no place in the curriculum, others claim it is too important to be left to chance and, like other aspects of education, it can and should be pursued for its own intrinsic value. For example, Siedentop (1982, p. 2) stated, 'if sport is equal to other ludic [movement] forms (art, drama, music and dance) both for the individual and the culture; and if more appropriate participation in sport represents a positive step in cultural evolution then sport in education is justified'. From another but still supportive perspective, Arnold (1997, p. I) claimed, 'sport is a trans-cultural valued practice ... and despite its corruption from time to time it is inherently concerned with concepts, ethical principles and moral values which are universally applicable and justified as a form of education'

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  • Bicultural perspectives on Māori legal research

    Mackinnon, Jacquelin (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Increasingly, legal research projects undertaken at law school or in practice will involve Māori custom law and/or tikanga Māori.' The role of both Māori custom law and tikanga Māori is most evident in the work of the Māori Land Court in the interpretation and application of legislation relating to Māori land. Increasingly, general statutes incorporate Māori principles and values, such as those to be found in the Resource Management Act 1991, or make explicit reference to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The statutory interpretation function of the Courts in relation to these, and less obvious examples, requires knowledge of tikanga Māori and/or Māori custom law. For any analysis of the work of the Courts or of the legislature, knowledge of tikanga Māori and/or custom law is required. Both Māori custom law and tikanga Māori are preserved by and accessed through the oral tradition. In addition to its role in the Courts and in relation to legislation, the most significant role played by the oral tradition is in the work of the Waitangi Tribunal. The oral tradition also plays an increasingly important part in other areas requiring research. What follows is an introduction to the oral tradition and its role in the legal system of Aotearoa/New Zealand. An understanding of the oral tradition is essential to the construction of a research path that is both ethical and effective.

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  • Superantigen architecture: Functional decoration on a conserved scaffold

    Arcus, Vickery L.; Baker, Edward N. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    A defining and consistent feature of the bacterial superantigens from Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes is their strongly conserved three-dimensional structure. Structural studies to date show that the array of more than 280 amino acid sequences known for superantigens (SAgs) and staphylococcal superantigen-like (SSL) proteins all have the same fold-a structure in which the same three-dimensional arrangement of α-helices and β-sheets is traced by each amino acid sequence, with the same topology (for recent reviews, see references 29 and 43). A typical SAg structure comprises two domains-an N-terminal β -barrel domain called an OB-fold (4, 25) and a C-terminal β-grasp domain in which a long α-helix packs on to a mixed parallel and antiparallel β-sheet. These two domains are traversed by an α-helix that lies at the N terminus of the protein and packs against the β-grasp domain, thus linking the N- and C-terminal domains.

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  • Jacqueline Fahey

    Dart, William (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Chez Jacqueline Fahey is a Grey Lynn bungalow. After walking past palmy luxuriance that could pass as a tropical setting for her 1998 novel, Cutting Loose, I'm soon in her front room, the wonders and delights of which would rival those of a Victorian parlour. There are additions since my last visit - beyond a 19205 screen is a vast mirror, its faux-baroque frame livened with cerulean blue from Fahey's brush. Significantly, it echoes the hue of the plastic flowers threaded through the chandelier.

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  • Reinhold Niebuhr’s Christian realism/ Christian idealism

    McKeogh, Colm (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The foregoing quip captures a realization that came to the young Reinhold Niebuhr in the 192os and that turned the liberal Christian pastor away from pacifism and toward a more realist ethic of politics. From then until his death in 1971, Niebuhr was to remain always a liberal Christian of realist bent. He was a liberal Christian in his concentration on the law of love as the only absolute and in his rejection of Christian fundamentalism, biblical literalism, and the consequent clash with science. He was a political realist, and rose to national prominence as such in the 1930S and 1940s, in his dismissal of pragmatic pacifism and his advocacy of American responsibility to use force in opposing the Nazi and Soviet threats to the world. He was famous particularly for his sharp attacks on those who failed to see the limits on morality in politics. Yet this realism was but one strand of Niebuhr's dualist approach to politics, the other being his Christian idealism.

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  • New Zealand families: Child-rearing practices and attitudes

    Ritchie, Jane (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Traditionally, the study of families has been the domain of sociology rather than of psychology. For sociologists the family is an important ‘institution’ because it is a key social structure that shapes the way society is organised. More recently psychology has been developing an interest in families.

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  • Industrial and organisational psychology

    O’Driscoll, Michael P.; Taylor, Paul J. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Industrial and organisational (I/0) psychology is concerned with people’s work-related values, attitudes and behaviours, and how these are influenced by the conditions in which they work. I/O psychologists contribute to both the effectiveness of organisations (e.g. improving productivity) and the health and well-being of people working within organisations. The field is related to other disciplines, such as organisational behaviour and human resource management, and also has close links with other sub-disciplines within psychology, especially social psychology and some aspects of human experimental psychology (e.g. cognition).

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  • Professional wellbeing

    Gardner, Dianne; O’Driscoll, Michael P. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The aim of this chapter is to review issues relating to wellbeing and stress that may affect psychologists. It will discuss the causes of stress and wellbeing and the outcomes for psychologists, then set out some realistic ways in which stress can be managed and wellbeing can be supported.

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  • Minimal Processing of Fruits and Vegetables

    Perera, Conrad (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Aiming high: teachers and their students

    Rubie-Davies, CM; Hattie, John; Townsend, Michael; Hamilton, Richard (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Alternative assessment in schools

    Gan, JS (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Dressing for War: Glamour and Duty in Women's Lives During the Second World War

    Montgomerie, Deborah (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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