173 results for Book item, 2008

  • A brave new e-world: An exploratory analysis of worldwide e-government readiness, level of democracy, corruption and globalization

    Kovacic, Z. (2008)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper reports research results on the relationship between e-government readiness and its components and the level of democracy, corruption, and globalization for 191 countries.

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  • The current status of the church.

    Fields, A. J.; Lineham, P. (2008)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Leading student support services for new times

    Thompson, J.; Shillington, S. (2008)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Examines the challenges facing universities in supporting and retaining students in a changing educational market place. It also suggests institutional strategies for meeting such challenges. Massey University is used as a case study to explore pertinent issues facing a long-term dual-mode provider of university education.

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  • Learning styles and adaptive ICT based learning environment.

    Kovacic, Z. (2008)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Participating in the world (wide web): Social connections for people with disabilities.

    Bowker, N. (2008)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Explores how people with disabilities are experiencing social connections, events and activities online.

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  • The shape of the future of the church.

    Fields, A. J.; Lineham, P. (2008)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses the shape of the future of the church in New Zealand.

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  • The influence of context on science curricula: Observations, conclusions and some recommendations for curriculum development and implementation

    Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The genesis of this project and book was our experiences of teaching science and science education at various levels in developing countries; in the Pacific and the Caribbean. These experiences along with numerous conversations with other teachers and educators who had worked in Africa and elsewhere left us with something of a sense of despair. We constantly confronted Western or foreign science curricula which were plainly alien to science learners in non-Western contexts. We witnessed numerous curricula reforms and professional development initiatives, many of which seemed doomed to failure. In fact Helu-Thaman (1991) referred to the ‘wreckage’ of aid-funded curricula initiatives all around the Pacific. Probably the most alarming aspect in all of this was the role of the foreign expert. Someone, normally ‘aid-funded’, who turned up for a short period of time to tell the locals what they should be doing! The naiveté of some of these people was truly remarkable (or perhaps they just didn’t care?). Failure of the program or reforms was generally attributed to the locals not ‘seeing it through’ or not quite understanding the new curriculum initiatives. There was little effort made to take into account local conditions or the views of local experts, especially teachers.

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  • The Logic of Terror

    Hokowhitu, Brendan (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Permission kindly granted to reproduce this chapter from Huia Publishers.

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  • Scalability of techniques for online geographic visualization of Web site hits

    Stanger, Nigel (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Extremely large data sets are now commonplace, and they are often visualized through the World Wide Web. Scalability of web-based visualization techniques is thus a key issue. This paper investigates the scalability of four representative techniques for dynamic map generation and display (e.g., for visualizing geographic sources of web site hits): generating a single composite map image, overlaying images on an underlying base map and two variants of overlaying HTML on a base map. These four techniques embody a mixture of different display technologies and distribution styles (three server-side and one distributed across both client and server). Each technique was applied to 20 synthetic data sets of increasing size, and the data set volume, elapsed time and memory consumption were measured. The results show that all four techniques are suitable for small data sets comprising a few thousand points, but that the two HTML techniques scale to larger data sets very poorly across all three variables.

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  • Science education in context: An overview and some observations

    Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This book presents an international perspective of the influence of educational context on science education. By this we mean the context in which the teaching and learning takes place, rather than the use of a context-based approach to learning and teaching (Pilot & Bulte, 2006). The focus is on the interactions between curriculum development and implementation in non-Western and non- English-speaking contexts (i.e., outside the UK, USA, Australia, NZ, etc.).

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  • Arnold Manaaki Wilson: Te Awakaunua

    Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Arnold Manaaki Wilson was born in 1928, in Ruatoki, a community which nestles beneath the misty Taiarahia hills, following the curves of the Ohinemataroa river valley – known to others as of his tuhoe people. They know him there as Te Wakaunua, after a provocative late 19th century political visionary. From Such radical Tuhoe ideas fused with the sculptural genius of his father, a renowned carver of the art-making Ngati Tarawhai of Te Arawa, Arnold Wilson emerged.

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  • Far-flung markers

    Lowe, David J.; Alloway, Brent V.; Shane, Phil A.R. (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Tephras are fragmentary materials that are blasted explosively into the air during volcanic eruptions. Distributed throughout Zealandia, tephras provide useful markers for connecting and dating land surfaces, sediment layers, and archaeological sites.

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  • Dusty horizons

    Lowe, David J.; Tonkin, Philip J.; Palmer, Alan S.; Palmer, Jonathan G. (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Dust whipped up and deposited by wind forms sheets of loess, which drape over the land. These loess deposits and the soils formed within them yield insights into past climatic and environmental change.

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  • A jade door: Reconciliatory justice as a way forward citing New Zealand experience

    Joseph, Robert (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Greenstone (jade) was highly valued in New Zealand because it was durable, beautiful, and precious. Greenstone is found only on the west coast of the South Island and was used as a means of exchange. In times of trouble, peace could be secured by ending warfare through a political marriage. Peace, thus established, was often likened figuratively to a greenstone door as both the woman and the peace ceremony were seen to be durable, strong, and valuable.

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  • Women, sport and the media: A complex terrain

    Bruce, Toni (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter I examine coverage of women’s sport, exposing the ways in which the sports media can simultaneously challenge and reinforce dominant assumptions that sport is primarily a male domain. I first summarize the extensive research that shows how the ‘everyday’ sporting activities of female athletes are trivialised and ignored by mediasport, before turning to a discussion of the times and places when female athletes visibly enter into public consciousness. Finally, I present examples from two case studies; one which disrupts and one which supports traditional ways of understanding gender.

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  • Claiming space in sport: Opening wide the doors to sporting success

    Bruce, Toni (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    With a new millennium comes time to reflect on where we have been and where we are going. There are many stories of New Zealand sportswomen’s success that should be celebrated, and there is little doubt that visibility, opportunities, public support and recognition have improved over time. In this first section of the book, we focus on research that highlights some of those achievements.

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  • Spiritual writings and religious instruction

    Barratt, Alexandra (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    As soon as a would-be writer picked up the pen in this period, he (or just occasionally she) had to make a far-reaching decision: whether to write in English, Anglo-Norman or Latin. The answer would emerge from the intersection of the text's genre and of the gender, social and religious status of both the writer and the planned audience. Until around 1300, Latin texts would be read almost exclusively by male clerics and vernacular texts by the laity of both sexes and by women religious, though Anglo-Norman texts might be aimed at a slightly higher social class than those in Middle English. But Latin texts might also function as scripts for oral transmission by priests to their parishioners in English, while male clerics did read, and own, texts in French and English as well as Latin. In the fourteenth century, however, `a new, more pragmatic view of the appropriate language' developed. The choice of French or English became `fundamentally a political decision - whether to address the rulers or the ruled. The writers themselves, nearly always clerics, are those with education who are for that reason part of the establishment of power. In composing in English they are addressing the unlearned, sometimes to edify, sometimes to entertain, always to instruct.'

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  • What may be learnt about the archaeology of islands from archaeologically derived models of the exploration of Polynesia, 1966-2001?

    Sutton, Douglas G. (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Polynesian archaeology is one regional specialization in the world-wide practice of archaeological investigations of islands, oceans and seas. It is timely to consider how Polynesian archaeology fits within that newly-articulated framework of theoretical and methodological advances concerned with islands. To do this, I examine the history of archaeologically-derived models of the exploration of Polynesia developed since the invention of radiocarbon dating.

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  • Some inconvenient truths about education in Aotearoa-New Zealand

    Thrupp, Martin (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    How does poverty affect New Zealand children’s schooling? Answers to this question generally revolve around three perspectives. First, it is argued that the children of families in poverty in New Zealand are disadvantaged in schools because of the level and nature of their family resources. Such resources can be both material and cultural: ill health, poor nutrition, overcrowding and transience, fewer curriculum relevant experiences, limited literacy and little early childhood education all reduce the ability of children to progress at school (Biddulph, J, & Biddulph, 2003; Nash, 1993). Second, it is argued that schools serving poorer areas are under-resourced. This applies more to places such as the USA, where school funding depends on the tax-base of local districts (Kozol, 1991), than to New Zealand, where schools are funded nationally and extra funding is provided for low socio-economic “low-decile” schools. Nevertheless underfunding, or the method of funding, of low-decile schools remains an issue in New Zealand, both because of relatively low parent and community contributions in such schools, and because of the sheer scale of their students’ needs. A third perspective is that poor teaching and ineffective schools are the problem, rather than poverty. Yet quality teaching and school improvement cannot be divorced from the social context. Low socio-economic schools often find it difficult to recruit permanent, long-term teaching staff. Teachers at low-socio-economic schools struggle more to meet the learning needs of children and spend a lot more time on pastoral care than in those middle class settings (Thrupp, 1999).

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  • “Let's go round the circle:” How verbal facilitation can function as a means of direct instruction

    Brown, Mike (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter, the term facilitation refers to the act of conducting a verbal discussion prior to, or after an activity, with the aim of encouraging students to reflect on what will, or has been, learned from experiences. An overview of the role of the leader/facilitator, as advocated in some widely available adventure education texts, is discussed. This is followed by an outline of the methodological approach that guided the research project. The analysis section highlights how the leader was observed directing and orchestrating the direction of talk through the "common sense" and everyday ways of conducting verbal facilitation sessions. The primary focus of analysis is on the structure of the interaction in these sessions (i.e., a leader-initiated topic for discussion, a student reply, and leader evaluation of this response). Short excerpts of data are used to support and illustrate the claims that are made in regard to the nature of the interaction that is observed in these settings.

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