184 results for Book item, 2010

  • Transitions and home-based care : a literature review

    Everiss, L. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This literature review on the transition of young children from home to early childhood settings was undertaken as part of the Centre of Innovation (COI) project carried out by Hutt Family Day Care, Lower Hutt, in 2006-7. It has the potential to inform and guide practices for children settling into and moving between home and home-based or other early childhood settings, and between early childhood settings and school.

    View record details
  • Legal issues at Sommerside Pottery.

    Barrett, J. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    A case study which discusses the legal issues of Sommerside Pottery - a fictional busines.

    View record details
  • Simulating negotiation of a collective agreement.

    Barrett, J. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    A case study which discusses the negotiation of a collective agreement.

    View record details
  • A model for classroom and distance education

    Nichols, M. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    View record details
  • Self selection of athletes into sports via skeletal ratios.

    Stewart, A. D.; Benson, P. J.; Olds, T.; Marfell-Jones, M. J.; MacSween, A.; Nevill, A. M. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses self selection of athletes into sports via skeletal ratios.

    View record details
  • Intellectual property rights.

    Barrett, J. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    A case study which discusses intellectual property rights.

    View record details
  • Children experiencing poverty: Opportunities and challenges for New Zealand early childhood educators

    Rosewarne, S.; Shuker, M. J. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    View record details
  • Progress not perfection : the art of reflective pratice.

    Broadley, Mary-Liz; Fagan, T. J. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    View record details
  • The new media, cultural transformation, tourism and orientation

    Theunissen, P.; Mersham, G. M.; Rahman, K. A. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    View record details
  • Team-based, creative learning and bridging education

    Howland, P. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Frustrated by high student attrition and failure rates – both course-specific and overall within Victoria University of Wellington’s (VUW) Level 4 University Preparation programme – the author developed and introduced team-based, creative learning exercises and assessments into the social science elective (UP016) in an attempt to overcome this situation. The introduction of team-based, creative learning (TBCL) resulted in improved student retention and course pass rates for UP016 and has had positive socio-educational outcomes for both students and teachers. This article and the accompanying video, produced with the assistance of an AKO Good Practice Publication Grant (GPPG10-004), examines the rationales behind the introduction of TBCL; the operational mechanics (e.g. group formation); problems encountered and consequent refinements made; possible improvements for future applications of TBCL; and the impact of TBCL on student retention and success in UP016 over four trimesters during 2009–2010.

    View record details
  • Quality management system at the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand.

    Anderson, R.; Laurs, A.; Robinson, C, L.; Rawnsley, S. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses the Open Polytechnic's progress in developing and maintaining a best practice Quality Management System (QMS) by providing the context and evolution of the institution's QMS leading up to the major ITPQ Academic Audit in late 2006.

    View record details
  • Towards a social ontology of improvised sound work

    Russell, B. (2010)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Improvised sound work is one of the key areas of inter-generic hybridity in contemporary music. Any attempt to identify a social role and agree on a cultural meaning for such improvisational practice must grapple first with issues of definition. These issues are especially acute for emerging hybrid practices because their practical development outstrips the ability of the available critical/ideological structures to provide useful and generally agreed definitions for them.

    View record details
  • Towards a social ontology of improvised sound work

    Russell, B. (2010)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Improvised sound work is one of the key areas of inter-generic hybridity in contemporary music. Any attempt to identify a social role and agree on a cultural meaning for such improvisational practice must grapple first with issues of definition. These issues are especially acute for emerging hybrid practices because their practical development outstrips the ability of the available critical/ideological structures to provide useful and generally agreed definitions for them.

    View record details
  • The digitisation of New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture

    Stanger, Nigel (2010-09-15)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Over the last 25 years, it has become possible to digitise and store an ever-increasing amount and variety of material. New Zealand has been one of the leaders in this area, with early initiatives such as the New Zealand Digital Library in the mid 1990s and the more recent Digital Content Strategy (http://www.digitalcontent.govt.nz/) promoting the idea of digitising New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture and making it available online. The government is committed to ensuring “New Zealand will be a world leader in using information and technology to realise its economic, environmental, social and cultural goals” (New Zealand Government, 2005, p. 4). They see New Zealanders as world leaders in using information and technology to build globally connected science and technology research communities. A key benefit of digitising research, cultural and heritage material is improved accessibility. It can be difficult and laborious to find specific items in traditional “hard copy” collections, whereas digital collections can be quickly and easily searched. They can also be made available via the Internet to a much larger audience than was previously possible. Digitisation also removes the access bottleneck arising from there being few physical copies of an item, as many people can access the same digital item simultaneously. Finally, digitisation helps us to preserve fragile historical material by reducing the need for physical access, and hence the likelihood of further physical damage or even loss. The need to store and manage digital collections of this nature has driven the development of digital libraries and repositories of various kinds, including the already mentioned New Zealand Digital Library. More recently, the launch of the government’s Digital Strategy in 2005 resulted in a nationwide proliferation of digital research repositories at New Zealand tertiary institutions, and ultimately led to the development of the Kiwi Research Information Service (KRIS) by the National Library of New Zealand. These developments have made New Zealand’s research readily available to the wider world. The same technologies used to build these institutional research repositories are also now being applied in non-academic areas. In 2006, the Cardrona Online Museum was launched, with the aim of storing and making available heritage materials relating to the Cardrona district. The launch attracted strong interest and has led into an ongoing project to develop a similar repository for the Central Otago region. In parallel, the Horowhenua Library Trust and Katipo Communications, Ltd., developed the Kete software to facilitate online community collaboration, and recently, the National Library began to harvest and index content from New Zealand Web sites for its DigitalNZ project. In this chapter, we will examine these developments, their impact on the dissemination of New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture, and look forward to future developments in this area.

    View record details
  • Huw Price

    Legg, Catherine (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    A review of the life and work of Australian philosopher, Huw Price.

    View record details
  • Kant, Skepticism, and the Comparison Argument

    Vanzo, Alberto (2010)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Kant's writings on logic illustrate the comparison argument about truth, which goes as follows. A truth-bearer p is true if and only if it corresponds, or it agrees, with a portion of reality: the object(s), state(s) of affairs, or event(s) p is about. In order to know whether p agrees with that portion of reality, one must check if that portion of reality is as p states. Using the terms of the comparison argument, one must compare p with that portion of reality. This is impossible, because the only knowledge of reality we can have is in the form propositions, beliefs, or judgments, whose agreement with reality is as much in need of justification as the agreement of p with reality. Therefore, it is impossible to know which truth-bearers are true. In this paper, I reconstruct Kant's version of the comparison argument. I argue that, for Kant, the argument is sound only under the assumption of transcendental realism. Transcendental idealism avoids the sceptical consequences of the comparison argument.

    View record details
  • An introduction to ethical consideration in international environmental law

    Gillespie, Alexander (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this chapter is to give the reader an overview of where some of the ethical debates in international environmental law are currently found. This chapter builds upon my earlier work in this area, which is contained in “International Environmental Law, Policy and Ethics”.

    View record details
  • A continuum model for the dynamics of the phase transition from slow-wave sleep to REM sleep

    Sleigh, James W.; Wilson, Marcus T.; Voss, Logan J.; Steyn-Ross, D. Alistair; Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Li, Xiaoli (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Previous studies have shown that activated cortical states (awake and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep), are associated with increased cholinergic input into the cerebral cortex. However, the mechanisms that underlie the detailed dynamics of the cortical transition from slow-wave to REM sleep have not been quantitatively modeled. How does the sequence of abrupt changes in the cortical dynamics (as detected in the electrocorticogram) result from the more gradual change in subcortical cholinergic input? We compare the output from a continuum model of cortical neuronal dynamics with experimentally-derived rat electrocorticogram data. The output from the computer model was consistent with experimental observations. In slow-wave sleep, 0.5–2-Hz oscillations arise from the cortex jumping between “up” and “down” states on the stationary-state manifold. As cholinergic input increases, the upper state undergoes a bifurcation to an 8-Hz oscillation. The coexistence of both oscillations is similar to that found in the intermediate stage of sleep of the rat. Further cholinergic input moves the trajectory to a point where the lower part of the manifold in not available, and thus the slow oscillation abruptly ceases (REM sleep). The model provides a natural basis to explain neuromodulator-induced changes in cortical activity, and indicates that a cortical phase change, rather than a brainstem “flip-flop”, may describe the transition from slow-wave sleep to REM.

    View record details
  • ‘Doctoring’ our own: Confessions of a Māori doctoral supervisor

    Hohepa, Margie Kahukura (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    There is very little literature, empirically based or otherwise, on the supervision of Māori doctoral students (Fitzgerald, 2005; Pope, 2008; Kidman, 2007; Smith, 2007). There is even less relating to Māori supervisors working with Māori doctoral students (Kidinan, 2007), let alone Māori supervisors working with non- Māori students. While the relatively large corpus of literature on doctoral supervision may be of some assistance to Māori supervisors, there is also a dearth of studies that focus on the pedagogical aspects. Research undertaken by Elizabeth McKinley and her co-researchers (McKinley, Grant, Middleton, Irwin & Williams, 2009) will now help to fill the literature gap on the teaching and learning process of supervision as it pertains to Māori.

    View record details
  • In search of the audience

    Zanker, Ruth; Lealand, Geoff (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    We all are members of media audiences. On many occasions, we are self-consciously so – such as when we sit in darkness in a cinema, transfixed by a larger-than-life screen, sharing the experience with a group of relative strangers. More frequently, we are part of an audience through habit or circumstance. Much of our media use is habitual. We are often barely aware of it. We scan the morning newspaper, half-listen to the car radio or iPod on the journey to work or university, glance at billboards, check online daily news updates, glance at the evening news bulletin – all this happens amidst the clutter of domestic life and regular patterns of work and leisure.

    View record details