113 results for Book item, 2013

  • Towards a Unified Concept of Distance Learning.

    Strongman, L. (2013)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Being a leader in Open and Distance Higher Education.

    Seelig, C. (2013)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Distance learning: the 'risk mitigation' case for independent governmental performance measures in New Zealand.

    Strongman, L.; Kobeleva, P. (2013)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Global challenges faced by Institutes of Technology or Polytechnics (ITP) are complex. With a particular focus on distance learning, this chapter discusses the key variables of global challenge (or threats and drivers) to ITPs and shows how these variables may be mitigated for organisational advantage. In addition, the focus of the argument is directed to an equity imbalance currently experienced in the distance learning ITP sector in New Zealand. Namely, that distance learning providers must compete under the same funding criteria as contact or face-to-face providers despite differences in learning delivery mode.

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  • Advertising, Public Relations and Social Marketing: shaping behaviour towards sustainable consumption

    Muratovski, G (2013-12-09)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    As the world struggles to sustain mass consumption as a lifestyle of choice, the need for sustainable behaviour becomes increasingly evident. Even though there are already a number of technical and legislative solutions underway, we still need to work on changing our consumption habits. This calls for social marketing strategies that can lead to promotion and acceptance of sustainable behaviour on a global scale. The problem, however, is that social marketing for sustainability that dominates the media today is ineffective and even counterproductive. In this study, I will examine what drives consumerism, and argue that sustainable consumption could be promoted as an alternative lifestyle, based on the same strategies that have successfully established mass consumption as a way of life. Countering the claims made for traditional social marketing, I will suggest that appealing to people’s innermost desires in the same way commercial marketing does, is in fact a more effective means of behaviour change than the negative information campaigns that are prevalent today. This calls for a different type of social marketing—one based on positive appeals related to subjective wellbeing and self-fulfilment, and not on scare tactics and dull educational campaigns.

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  • Globalised desk-top skirmishes? Reporting from the colonies

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr. (2013-10-22)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • From chaos towards sense: a learner-centric narrative virtual learning space

    Reiners, T; Wood, L; Dron, J (2013-12-17)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Throughout educational settings there are a range of open-focused learning activities along with those that are much more closed and structured. The plethora of opportunities creates a confusing melee of opportunities for teachers as they attempt to create activities that will engage and motivate learners. In this chapter, we demonstrate a learner-centric narrative virtual learning space, where the unrestricted exploration is combined with mechanisms to monitor the student and provide indirect guidance through elements in the learning space. The instructional designer defines the scope of the story in which the teacher and learner create narratives (a sequence of actions and milestones to complete a given task), which can be compared, assessed, and awarded with badges and scores. The model is described using an example from Logistics; where incoming orders have to be fulfilled by finding the good and delivering it to a given location in a warehouse. Preliminary studies showed that the model is able to engage the learner, create an intrinsic motivation and therewith curiosity to drive the self-paced learning.

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  • Love of teaching: reflections of what it means to be an effective Pasifika ECE lecturer

    Utumapu-McBride, T (2013-12-03)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper is based on my reflections of an effective Pasifika Early Childhood Education (ECE) lecturer (as a result of my own personal journey and insights, e.g. my career change from that of a Learning Development Lecturer) and also through a literature review. The Auckland University of Technology's (AUT) academic promotion evaluations clearly stipulates in the criteria the characteristics of an effective lecturer as being someone who is approachable; organised and well prepared; communicates effectively; enthusiasm helps students to learn; helps students learn by using explanations and practical examples; effectively uses subject knowledge to guide students' learning; assess understanding when teaching and gives constructive feedback about students' progress; seeks and responds to feedback from students; clearly communicates assessment requirements; treats students with respect; creates a positive learning environment for students; helps students to take responsibility for their own learning; and lastly is seen as a highly effective teacher.

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  • To act or not to act? That is the question!

    Bruce Ferguson, Pip (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The year was 2003. I was a new Research Manager working in a Māori tertiary institution that had a history of inequitable treatment by government, through not receiving establishment funding that had gone unproblematically to non-Māori institutions. Repeating a common pattern in New Zealand, our government had decided to implement a research funding scheme, to be measured at the level of the individual academic. My institution’s decision to participate in the PBRF was not without its difficulties, and it is here that the ethics of participation become problematic. This chapter is about our ability to articulate our values, to show how we work these out in our practice, and how we are accountable to ourselves and others for that practice. Would I, with the benefit of hindsight, have encouraged my institution to enter the PBRF again?

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  • Drug delivery by electroporation: Review

    Talele, Sadhana (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. Most common routes of administration include the preferred non-invasive peroral (through the mouth), topical (skin), transmucosal (nasal, buccal/sublingual, vaginal, ocular and rectal) and inhalation routes. Current effort in the area of drug delivery include the development of targeted delivery in which the drug is only active in the target area of the body (for example, in cancerous tissues) and sustained release formulations in which the drug is released over a period of time in a controlled manner from a formulation. This is achieved by combining electroporation with the input of drugs at a location. This paper reviews the process of electroporation and then further discusses the electrochemotherapy, one of the most upcoming application of electroporation in biotechnology.

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  • A fair go for all: a problematic contribution to anti-racism praxis in Aotearoa

    Came, H (2013-11-23)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In New Zealand, the Human Rights Commission is the lead agency in countering institutional racism. They have recently undertaken a major research project, A Fair Go For All (Human Rights Commission 2011), to inform the development of a national strategy/approach to counter structural discrimination. This paper, from an activist scholarship standpoint argues their chosen approach has ignoring the power relations inherent in researching racism. Furthermore their approach has minimised both the historic element of racism against Māori and the significance of Te Tiriti o Waitangi to anti-racism praxis in Aotearoa. Rather than endorse an ad hoc approach with a focus on practitioner bias (personally-mediated racism), and addressing ethnic inequalities (the outcome of institutional racism) this paper advocates for a Tiriti based systems change approach to transform institutional racism as it manifests in the neo-colonial context of Aotearoa.

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  • Coopetition in supply chains: a case study of a coopetitive structure in the horticulture industry

    Wood, LC (2013-11-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Supply chain management has been increasingly seen as a strategic tool to improve the competitiveness of companies. Coopetition, the mingling of competitive and cooperative relationships, has been utilised by New Zealand companies in the horticulture industry to help break into and develop new markets. Using a case study various elements of the supply chain are examined from both strategic and operational perspectives for this group of companies and their customers and suppliers. The connections to the customer are shown to be enhanced through careful implementation, as the group of companies act to adjust their entire supply chains to make them increasingly customer-orientated. Significant benefits that are shown to accrue include improved information flow, increased ability to supply, and flexibility to meet customer requirements.

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  • Poverty reduction strategies via public-private partnerships: the role of e-government solutions in supporting supplier diversity programmes

    Jeeva, AS; Wood, LC (2013-11-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Government procurement practices influence large volumes of spending in communities and further procurement can be influenced through legislative efforts. Through these mechanisms government bodies carry significant influence on the way in which procurement spend occurs and they have the ability to influence the direction that the procurement may take. Carefully constructed parameters in public-private partnerships (PPP) can shift the focus of procurement activities towards engaging with the local businesses and communities. This represents an approach for government bodies to increase supplier diversity so that, in alignment with UN Millennium goals of poverty reduction, local suppliers can be provided with business opportunities and methods to reduce poverty. A two-focus approach is adopted; first, government drivers and policies are examined in the context of social engagement. Second, the roles and challenges faced by small firms in the local communities are highlighted. This demonstrates the way in which e-government procurement systems play a pivotal role in supporting local sourcing initiatives.

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  • Wine maturation using high electric field

    Talele, Sadhana; Benseman, Mark (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Wine maturation can take a long time and consumes storage space which can be a drawback while considering commercial aspect of wine making. In the past scientists have carried out experiments on maturing wine quickly using ultrasounds or gamma radiations. This study reports about maturing wine with high electric field at different frequencies applied for a short time duration. The electric field intensity and the frequency of the field along with the exposure time of wine to this field seem to be important parameters that could affect the the treated wine. Results obtained are encouraging and have a potential for commercial interest.

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  • Immersive Virtual Environments to facilitate authentic education in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    Reiners, T; Wood, LC (2013-11-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter will cover our current research focus concerning developing and trialling immersive environments as an innovative and authentic approach to teaching and learning in Logistics and Supply Chain Management, incorporating seamlessly integrated assessment and feedback. Developed educational and assessment tools will allow students to demonstrate that they have successfully applied theoretical knowledge in real contexts and developed appropriate skills before entering the workforce. Greater authenticity allows students to experience different roles and exposes them to multiple business cases over supply chains that, in reality, span the globe. The project addresses the inauthentic pedagogical approaches in current classroom and distance-learning environments, and will propose a methodology that utilises existing technologies. The simulation will combine emerging technologies to represent multiple problem dimensions into one space; enabling students to observe, engage, interact, and participate in self-guided or group-based learning scenarios; receiving instant, multi-perspective, media-rich feedback to support their learning; and enabling further iterative scenario-based training.

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  • Graphical displays in eco-feedback: a cognitive approach

    Ford, Rebecca; Karlin, Beth (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Psychological research indicates that the provision of feedback is a key element in reinforcing and/or changing behavior, and whilst results from empirical studies on eco-feedback are positive, variation in findings suggests that its effectiveness may depend on both what information is provided and how it is presented. The design of graphical displays is an important component, but past display research has been primarily qualitative and exploratory. This paper introduces and tests a cognitive model of visual information processing applied to eco-feedback to evaluate differences in interpretation and preference between images. Participants were shown images that varied by number of data points as well as display features and were asked to interpret the images and report on image usability. Findings support the cognitive model, suggesting that eco-feedback displays appear to be more successful when they: (1) contain fewer data points; (2) employ data chunking; and/or (3) include pictures.

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  • Global Regulation of Nanotechnologies and Their Products in Medicine

    Moore, Jennifer (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Nanotechnology, an emerging technology, is creating innovative medicinal products for clinical use. The convergence of nanotechnologies with medicine is predicted to transform the health care sector, particularly pharmaceutical development. Jurisdictions, such as the European Union, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, have witnessed the launch of medical products containing nanomaterials. Many of the nanomedicines on the market, in clinical testing, or under regulatory review, promise to improve existing products and treat diseases more effectively. The purposes of this chapter are to (a) describe nanotechnology, in particular, its clinical applications; (b) analyze the application of medical products regulation in several jurisdictions (the European Union, United States, Australia, and New Zealand); and (c) assess the adequacy of this law for managing the potential risks posed by nanomedicines. There are gaps in the public health/health science evidence about the risks associated with nanomedicines, and there is concern that the novel properties of some nanomedicines will bring unforeseen human and environmental health and safety risks. Analysts project that, by 2014, the market for medical products containing nanomaterials will be US$18 billion per year. Given the predicted market for nanomedicines, and the growing evidence of their potential risks, it is important to have adequate regulation of these products to prevent adverse public health outcomes. Regulators and clinicians will need to consider the risks posed by some nanomedicines against the potential benefits to patients who are prescribed these products.

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  • Maximizing the good and minimizing the bad: relationships in organizations

    Cooper-Thomas, HD; Morrison, R (2013-11-28)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this chapter we introduce the complexities of relationships in organizations, and outline why they are important to study. We discuss the main themes of this book providing a brief overview of the chapters and making links between them. The chapters canvas a wide range of organizational relationships, both positive and fruitful, and dysfunctional and damaging.

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  • The state in action: an insider’s view of how the state regulates the use of PGD with HLA tissue-typing in New Zealand

    Henaghan, Mark; Cleary, Thomas (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand the choice by intending parents to use reproductive technology is limited by legislation. This default restriction on the prospective parents’ procreative autonomy applies unless the use of the assisted reproductive procedure has been approved on the basis of guidelines or regulations. The task of creating these guidelines falls to a non-governmental advisory committee, the Advisory Committee on Assisted Reproductive Technology (ACART). This advisory committee is supposedly unconstrained by political considerations and, in theory, provides a forum for deliberative discussions on the ethical and social disagreements that surround the use of assisted reproductive technologies. This chapter provides an analysis, from the perspective of a member of ACART, of how the advisory committee functions in reality. It focuses specifically on the developments of guidelines controlling the use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tissue-typing, more commonly referred to as creating ‘saviour siblings’.

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  • Position and direction finding for exploration and mapping

    Goodwin, David (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Land Tenure: The Wide View

    Goodwin, David (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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