120 results for Book item, 2014

  • Open Polytechnic: Information and library studies programmes

    Fields, A. J. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • History: The development of library service in New Zealand

    Fields, A. J. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Policing art: Political potential of creative practices in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Diprose, G. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Explores how creativity and social art practices can be understood as political activism.

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  • Corporate governance in Malaysia: Cosiness, cronyism and corruption.

    Chang, A. L. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • LIS undergraduate education in New Zealand: Development and contemporary issues.

    Cossham, A. F.; Wellstead, P.; Welland, S. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This chapter reviews and discusses Library and Information Science (LIS) undergraduate education in New Zealand over the past 30 years, and identifies issues and research needs. It examines contemporary issues facing LIS education in a rapidly changing information environment, affected by a particular historical and social context and changes to the higher education sector nationally and internationally. Issues include professionalization, the tension between education and continuing professional development, the difficulty of keeping programmes up to date and reflective of industry needs in times of fiscal restraint, and the complexities of the particular student body, as well as changes in the LIS sector more generally. It highlights research needs and shows how professional associations and LIS educators are addressing these issues through a range of solutions designed to strengthen the library, records, and archives professions.

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  • From the Antipodes: embedded librarians at the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand.

    Fields, A. J.; Clarke, P. S. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    The authors of the book’s 12 chapters, academic librarians representing a broad range of colleges and universities, explore the evolution of the embedded librarian from physical to virtual, suggest how to develop and implement unique programs in and out of the classroom and explain how to scale programs once they are embedded.

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  • Case Study: The impact of social media on public information management

    Mersham, G. M. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Waste management following earthquake disaster

    Brown, C. (2014)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Waste management following earthquake disaster

    Brown, C. (2014)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Earthquakes can create large volumes of debris and solid waste. Depending on the severity of the earthquake and the nature of the built environment, waste volumes can be the equivalent of many times the annual waste generated by an affected community. Improved standards for built infrastructure are decreasing the probable impact of earthquakes in many communities. However, increased urbanisation and dependence on complex infrastructure networks increases a community’s vulnerability to a disaster. This also increases the likely amount of waste produced.

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  • From Picardy to Picton

    Oosterman, A (2014-01-22)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    When New Zealand bound itself militarily to Great Britain at the outbreak of war with Germany in August 1914, discussion arose over how the news of the conflict was to be conveyed to readers back home. This chapter considers how news of the war on the Western Front was conveyed to New Zealanders back home and the role played by the country's first official war correspondent, Malcolm Ross.

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  • Research in global software engineering: a systematic snapshot

    Raza, B; MacDonell, SG; Clear, Tony (2014-01-09)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper reports our extended analysis of the recent literature addressing global software engineering (GSE), using a new Systematic Snapshot Mapping (SSM) technique. The primary purpose of this work is to understand what issues are being addressed and how research is being carried out in GSE – and comparatively, what work is not being conducted. We carried out the analysis in two stages. In the first stage we analyzed 275 papers published between January 2011 and June 2012, and in the second stage we augmented our analysis by considering a further 26 papers (from the 2013 International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE’13). Our results reveal that, currently, GSE studies are focused on management- and infrastructure-related factors, using principally evaluative research approaches. Most of the studies are conducted at the organizational level, mainly using methods such as interviews, surveys, field studies and case studies. The USA, India and China are major players in GSE, with USA-India collaborations being the most frequently studied, followed by USA-China. While a considerable number of GSE-related studies have been published since January 2011 they are currently quite narrowly focused, on exploratory research and explanatory theories, and the critical research paradigm has been untouched. An absence of formulative research, experimentation and simulation, and a related focus on evaluative approaches, all suggest that existing tools, methods and approaches from related fields are being tested in the GSE context, even though these may not be inherently applicable to the additional scale and complexity of GSE.

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  • Off the grid. Left out and over.

    Douglas, C (2014-02-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • EEG signal processing for brain-computer interfaces

    Georgieva, P; Silva, F; Milanova, M; Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter is focused on recent advances in electroencephalogram (EEG) signal processing for brain computer interface (BCI) design. A general overview of BCI technologies is first presented, and then the protocol for motor imagery noninvasive BCI for mobile robot control is discussed. Our ongoing research on noninvasive BCI design based not on recorded EEG but on the brain sources that originated the EEG signal is also introduced. We propose a solution to EEG-based brain source recovering by combining two techniques, a sequential Monte Carlo method for source localization and spatial filtering by beamforming for the respective source signal estimation. The EEG inverse problem is previously studded assuming that the source localization is known. In this work for the first time the problem of inverse modeling is solved simultaneously with the problem of the respective source space localization.

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  • Ontologies and machine learning systems

    Tegginmath, S; Pears, R; Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this chapter we review the uses of ontologies within bioinformatics and neuroinformatics and the various attempts to combine machine learning (ML) and ontologies, and the uses of data mining ontologies. This is a diverse field and there is enormous potential for wider use of ontologies in bioinformatics and neuroinformatics research and system development. A systems biology approach comprising of experimental and computational research using biological, medical, and clinical data is needed to understand complex biological processes and help scientists draw meaningful inferences and to answer questions scientists have not even attempted so far.

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  • Information methods for predicting risk and outcome of stroke

    Liang, L; Krishnamurthi, R; Kasabov, N; Feigin, V (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Stroke is a major cause of disability and mortality in most economically developed countries. It is the second leading cause of death worldwide (after cancer and heart disease) [55.1, 2] and a major cause of disability in adults in developed countries [55.3]. Personalized modeling is an emerging effective computational approach, which has been applied to various disciplines, such as in personalized drug design, ecology, business, and crime prevention; it has recently become more prominent in biomedical applications. Biomedical data on stroke risk factors and prognostic data are available in a large volume, but the data are complex and often difficult to apply to a specific person. Individualizing stroke risk prediction and prognosis will allow patients to focus on risk factors specific to them, thereby reducing their stroke risk and managing stroke outcomes more effectively. This chapter reviews various methods–conventional statistical methods and computational intelligent modeling methods for predicting risk and outcome of stroke.

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  • Computational modeling with spiking neural networks

    Schliebs, S; Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter reviews recent developments in the area of spiking neural networks (SNN) and summarizes the main contributions to this research field. We give background information about the functioning of biological neurons, discuss the most important mathematical neural models along with neural encoding techniques, learning algorithms, and applications of spiking neurons. As a specific application, the functioning of the evolving spiking neural network (eSNN) classification method is presented in detail and the principles of numerous eSNN based applications are highlighted and discussed.

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  • Brain, gene, and quantum inspired computational intelligence

    Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter discusses opportunities and challenges for the creation of methods of computational intelligence (CI) and more specifically – artificial neural networks (ANN), inspired by principles at different levels of information processing in the brain: cognitive, neuronal, genetic, and quantum, and mainly, the issues related to the integration of these principles into more powerful and accurate CI methods. It is demonstrated how some of these methods can be applied to model biological processes and to improve our understanding in the subject area; generic CI methods being applicable to challenging generic AI problems. The chapter first offers a brief presentation of some principles of information processing at different levels of the brain and then presents brain inspired, gene inspired, and quantum inspired CI. The main contribution of the chapter, however, is the introduction of methods inspired by the integration of principles from several levels of information processing, namely: A computational neurogenetic model that in one model combines gene information related to spiking neuronal activities. A general framework of a quantum spiking neural network (SNN) model. A general framework of a quantum computational neurogenetic model (CNGM). Many open questions and challenges are discussed, along with directions for further research.

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  • International child abduction, intercountry adoption and international commercial surrogacy

    Henaghan, Mark; Ballantyne, Ruth (2014)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    The significance and complexities of both international child abduction and intercountry adoption led to the creation of two Hague Conventions. This chapter analyses the policy challenges facing the international aspects of The Hague Convention of 25 October 1980 on the Civil Aspects of International aspects of Child Abduction (the Abduction Convention) and The Hague Convention of 29 may 1993 on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (the Adoption Convention). Policy challenges for the Abduction Convention include the changing profile of the 'abducting parent'; domestic violence and the 'grave risk' exception; the 'child objection' exception; international interpretation inconsistencies; and the problem of non-signatory countries. Policy challenges faced by the Adoption Convention include the socio-economic realities of intercountry adoption and the resulting power imbalances; cultural and political differences; the difficulties of deciding what is in the best interests of children; problems of interpretation, implementation and enforcement; and the growing preference for international commercial surrogacy as a replacement for intercountry adoption. These policy issues highlight the need for these international conventions to constantly adapt and improve to meet the realities of international child abduction and intercountry adoption.

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  • Grandparents who Care for Grandchildren

    Henaghan, Mark (2014)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Both in New Zealand and abroad, a social trend is emerging of grandparents taking on the responsibility of parenting their grandchildren. This chapter examines the different ways in which grandparents can come to be legally involved in their grandchildren’s lives and their position under New Zealand’s legislative and common law regimes. By way of contrast, the somewhat different position of grandparents in the United States is analysed with reference to the United States Supreme Court decision of Troxel v Granville. The chapter also discusses the fundamental importance of children’s voices and concludes with an examination of the practical support available to grandparents who find themselves raising their grandchildren.

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  • A framework for product development

    McAloone, TC; Robotham, AJ (2014-01-07)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since the introduction of Integrated Product development in 1985, industry has widely been using this model to understand and articulate their design, business and production activities. Recently, however, the picture has started to alter, as the nature of industry’s business has had to adapt to a much more complex world and in many cases, Integrated Product Development is no longer a sufficient way of describing industry’s product development activity. This paper uses the model of Integrated Product Development as a start-point to exploring the changes that industry has been undergoing over the fifteen years since it was introduced and attempts to make pointers in the direction of a new framework for product development, which should guide industry in the future. The key research challenges that this paper identifies include: developing a framework that identifies and supports a multi-aspect approach to product development; understanding the strategic conditions that affect product development; developing a coherent approach to product quality based on product-life thinking; addressing environmental needs in a proactive manner through innovation techniques; and understanding both organisational and technical knowledge-management for improved product development

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