108 results for Book item, 2015

  • The Impact of Therapeutic Jurisprudence on the New Zealand Coronial Jurisdiction

    Moore, Jennifer (2015)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Coroners in New Zealand can make recommendations that may reduce the chances of occurrence of similar deaths in the future. Coronial recommendations can have pro-therapeutic outcomes. The recommendations hold therapeutic promise for bereaved families by refocusing families towards prevention of similar deaths. However, when coroners' recommendations are not implemented, this has counter-therapeutic outcomes for the community who deserve remedial action, and for families who hoped for change. This chapter uses evidence from New Zealand's first empirical study of coroners' recommendations. An empirical approach is taken because therapeutic jurisprudence is concerned with assessing the law's impact on people, and the study of impacts often requires data about people's experiences of legal processes.

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  • 'Mong'st the furies finde just recompence': Suicide and the supernatural in William Sampson's The Vow Breaker (1636)

    Martin, Fiona (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The prevailing view on suicide in early modern England was that it was absolutely 'contrary to the Lawes and ordinances of God: 1 and contemporary theologians including John Sym, William Willymat, Robert Hill and Richard Greenham expounded in sermons and treatises on the prohibitions against self-murder and the dire consequences attendant upon the soul of the deceased.2 To take one's own life indirectly challenged the authority of the Church, and suicide, in its violation of community values, also awakened fears of the supernatural and of what the condemned soul might be capable. On the popular stage, of course, dramatizations of suicide could provide shocking but arresting scenes of conflict, both on the personal level and within the affected community.

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  • Regional Assessment of Soil Change in Antarctica

    Balks, Megan R. (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Antarctica has a total area of 13.9 × 106 km², of which 44 890 km² (0.32 percent) is ice-free (Fox and Cooper, 1994; British Antarctic Survey, 2005) with potential for soil development. Ice free areas are mainly confined to the Antarctic Peninsula, a few places around the perimeter of the continent and along the Transantarctic Mountains. The largest ice-free area (approximately 5 000 km²) is the McMurdo Dry Valleys in the Ross Sea Region.

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  • Smart or Smarting: Student-library engagement in online distance education

    Ferrier-Watson, Anne (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This small-scale mixed methods study used surveys and focus groups to investigate the challenges faced by a cohort of online learners at the University of Waikato when seeking and referencing information for course assessments. The research also investigated the type of library support students value, as well as the barriers to their engagement with library information services. Findings revealed half the cohort reported they seldom used the library or library services during their degree; nearly three quarters of the cohort reported problems finding information; and over three quarters of the cohort did not seek help from the library. However, over three quarters of students reported they engaged with library referencing resources. This chapter makes observations about what it means to be ‘digitally smart’ in an academic library context, and suggests ways that library information services can be better provided and promoted to an information-saturated and time poor student audience.

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  • FLAX: Flexible and open corpus-based language collections development

    Fitzgerald, Alannah; Wu, Shaoqun; Marín, María José (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this case study we present innovative work in building open corpus-based language collections by focusing on a description of the opensource multilingual Flexible Language Acquisition (FLAX) language project, which is an ongoing example of open materials development practices for language teaching and learning. We present language-learning contexts from across formal and informal language learning in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Our experience relates to Open Educational Resource (OER) options and Practices (OEP) which are available for developing and distributing online subject-specific language materials for uses in academic and professional settings. We are particularly concerned with closing the gap in language teacher training where competencies in materials development are still dominated by print-based proprietary course book publications. We are also concerned with the growing gap in language teaching practitioner competencies for understanding important issues of copyright and licencing that are changing rapidly in the context of digital and web literacy developments. These key issues are being largely ignored in the informal language teaching practitioner discussions and in the formal research into teaching and materials development practices.

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  • Ein wahleignungstest für minderjährige?

    Munn, Nicholas (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In der modernen demokratischen Praxis gelten Alphabetisierungstests und andere Mechanismen, um Bürgerinnen und Bürger vom aktiven Wahlrecht auszuschließen, weithin und zurecht als verpönt. Dennoch scheinen zumindest einige Testformen ein probates Mittel darzustellen, um die Urteilsfähigkeit von Menschen mit bestimmten Defiziten zu erfassen. Der Beitrag diskutiert einen Vorschlag für ein Eignungstestregime, welches nur auf gegenwärtig von politischer Beteiligung ausgeschlossene junge Menschen angewendet wird, und setzt sich mit einer Reihe von Einwänden gegen einen solchen Vorschlag auseinander. Zuletzt macht er geltend, dass ein Eignungstestregime sowohl für die solcherart einbezogenen Individuen als auch für die demokratischen Staaten, die es implementieren würden, von Vorteil wäre.

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  • Far-flown markers

    Lowe, David J.; Alloway, Brent V.; Shane, Phil A.R. (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Tephras are fragmentary materials that are blasted explosively into the air during volcanic eruptions. Distributed throughout Zealandia, tephras provide useful markers for connecting and dating land surfaces, sediment layers, and archaeological sites.

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  • Regional Assessment of Soil Change in the Southwest Pacific

    Baldock, J.A.; Balks, Megan R.; Camps Arbestain, M.; Condron, L.M.; Elder-Ratutokarua, M.; Grundy, M.J.; Hewitt, A.E.; Kelliher, F.M.; Leys, J.F.; McKenzie, N.J.; McDowell, R.W.; Morrison, R.J.; Schoknecht, N.R. (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The Southwest Pacific region includes the 22 island nations of the Pacific1, New Zealand and Australia (Figure 15.1). The landscapes of the region are very diverse ranging from a large continental land mass through to tens of thousands of small islands across the enormous expanse of the southwest Pacific Ocean. There are extensive ancient flat lands through to some of the youngest and most tectonically active landscapes on the planet. Temperature and rainfall ranges are large because of the breadth of latitudes and elevations. As a consequence, the soils of the region are also diverse. The strongly weathered soils in humid tropical areas and the vast expanses of old soils across the Australian continent are particularly susceptible to disturbance and this is where some of the more intractable problems of soil management occur today.

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  • Dusty horizons

    Lowe, David J.; Tonkin, Philip J.; Palmer, Jonathan G.; Lanigan, Kerri Miriam; Palmer, Alan S. (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Dust whipped up and deposited by wind forms sheets of loess, which drape over the land. These loess deposits and the soils formed within them yield insights into past climatic and environmental change.

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  • Digital Smarts: Enhancing learning and teaching [Introduction]

    Wright, Noeline; Forbes, Dianne Leslie (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This book is a partnership on many levels—between co-editors, with and among the other chapter authors, external, international reviewers, and eventually with you, the book’s readership. Our colleagues have also had to trust us in the mentoring, leadership and fruition of this project. We also hope that the work is trusted in the sense of having a quality assurance process that stands up as rigorous and befitting an academic text. We will address that aspect in more detail later in this introduction. Partnership, trust and integrity are implicit in any edited book development that grows from within a shared context such as ours, the University of Waikato’s Faculty of Education.

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  • Scientific workflow management with ADAMS: building and data mining a database of crop protection and related data

    Reutemann, Peter; Holmes, Geoffrey (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Data mining is said to be a field that encourages data to speak for itself rather than “forcing” data to conform to a pre-specified model, but we have to acknowledge that what is spoken by the data may well be gibberish. To obtain meaning from data it is important to use techniques systematically, to follow sound experimental procedure and to examine results expertly. This paper presents a framework for scientific discovery from data with two examples from the biological sciences. The first case is a re-investigation of previously published work on aphid trap data to predict aphid phenology and the second is a commercial application for identifying and counting insects captured on sticky plates in greenhouses. Using support vector machines rather than neural networks or linear regression gives better results in case of the aphid trap data. For both cases, we use the open source machine learning workbench WEKA for predictive modelling and the open source ADAMS workflow system for automating data collection, preparation, feature generation, application of predictive models and output generation.

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  • Summer of Euphony

    Lodge, Martin (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This is a contribution included in the book ‘Jack! Celebrating Jack Body, Composer’. A book which celebrates the life and work of Jack Body through the recollections of friends and colleagues.

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  • Tephrochronology

    Lowe, David J.; Alloway, Brent V. (2015-06-18)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Tephrochronology is the use of primary, characterized tephras or cryptotephras as chronostratigraphic marker beds to connect and synchronize geological, paleoenvironmental, or archaeological sequences or events, or soils/paleosols, and, uniquely, to transfer relative or numerical ages or dates to them using stratigraphic and age information together with mineralogical and geochemical compositional data, especially from individual glass-shard analyses, obtained for the tephra/cryptotephra deposits. To function as an age-equivalent correlation and chronostratigraphic dating tool, tephrochronology may be undertaken in three steps: (i) mapping and describing tephras and determining their stratigraphic relationships, (ii) characterizing tephras or cryptotephras in the laboratory, and (iii) dating them using a wide range of geochronological methods. Tephrochronology is also an important tool in volcanology, informing studies on volcanic petrology, volcano eruption histories and hazards, and volcano-climate forcing. Although limitations and challenges remain, multidisciplinary applications of tephrochronology continue to grow markedly.

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  • Transformation geometry: Mā te nekehanga, mā te whakaata, mā te hurihanga

    Manuel, Hirāni; Hāwera, Mgārewa; Taylor, Merilyn (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The whakataukī (proverb) promotes the notion that navigating obstacles or barriers successfully is a natural part of learning. The learning and teaching of the Māori language and culture are key practices in Māori-medium settings. Teachers in such classrooms are actively promoting academic success as Māori through the medium of te reo Māori (the Māori language). This stance includes the learning of mathematics.

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  • A dramatic landscape

    Lowe, David J.; King, Carolyn M. (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter introduces the story of Pureora Forest Park (PFP), in the central North Island, New Zealand, by describing the extremely violent Taupo eruption of c. AD 232 and its consequences for the surrounding forests and mountains. It gives a broad-scale local geological history, detailing the origins of some important local sedimentary rocks and landforms with a bearing on the story, including limestone caverns and coal deposits. It describes the location of the future PFP on the western edge of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, and how the history of volcanic activity, together with erosion, have determined much of the character of its landscape, the radial drainage pattern and deep entrenchment of its rivers, the distribution of its vegetation, and its long isolation from human access and permanent settlement.

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  • Advancing Scholarship /scholarship in geography classrooms

    Chalmers, Lex (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The Scholarship examination is a longstanding feature of secondary school assessment. Scholarship is available to our “brightest and best” students in geography, and it is designed to recognise excellence and thereby enhance access to the tertiary education system. It is surprising, therefore, that geography Scholarship in New Zealand secondary schools has received little attention. Perhaps this is because Scholarship is a must-have feature of an education system shaped by meritocracy: it is hard to imagine a secondary education system that did not encourage students to think, act and perform independently at the highest level. Yet Scholarship is largely hidden; it has a publically available assessment specification and achievement standard, but it affects only a small proportion of the student population and teacher involvement in preparation for Scholarship is often modest, especially if low numbers cannot sustain a regular timetable slot. I will argue that while the intent of Scholarship is positive, the mechanism is crude: some very good students don’t enter Scholarship geography, some of the best don’t do themselves justice on the day, and not all forms of scholarship are revealed. The first substantive section of this chapter looks at the use of the word ‘Scholarship’ (capitalised) to describe the outcome of an assessment process in secondary schools. This section is followed by a commentary on ‘scholarship’ (lower case) as a broader description of learning, teaching, research and intellectual developments in a discipline. The initial focus is thus on geography Scholarship as a prescription in the secondary sector, the second on scholarship as a career aspiration of those engaged in geography in the tertiary sector: two different uses of the word underpinning a commitment to lifelong education. While there are clear connections between school geography Scholarship and the development of tertiary scholarship in geography, retaining them as discrete, item-bound entities is artificial. In the concluding sections of the chapter I argue that the opportunities provided by the particular nature of the Scholarship experience at Year 13 can build into intellectual futures that include broader definitions of scholarship. Central to this argument is recognition of the scholarly functions of secondary teachers of geography.

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  • Conclusion: Relationships of interdependence—Making the difference together

    Berryman, Mere (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter begins by taking a brief look at New Zealand history. It then presents two different Māori whakataukī as metaphors, both to reconnect to the beginning of the book and also to make connections throughout the book as a whole. These metaphors are used to bring the chapters together and to consider how inclusion, a term that is often highly contested and poorly understood (Wearmouth, 2009), might begin to be better understood and applied when working with Māori children and young people with disabilities, or special education needs, or both, and with their families.

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  • Hei Āwhina Mātua: A kaupapa Māori response to behaviour

    Berryman, Mere (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Hei Āwhina Mātua (strengthening parents and other adults), a kaupapa Māori research and development project, sought to capitalise on the strengths available within both whānau and teachers so that both groups could take joint responsibility for students' learning and behaviour. This required professionals trained in delivering learning and behavioural programmes for individual students working in culturally responsive and collaborative ways with adults, whānau, teachers and community members, This chapter returns to this study to reconsider the key findings.

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  • Akoranga whakarei: Learning about inclusion from four kura rumaki

    Berryman, Mere (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In 2004 the New Zealand Ministry of Education proposed two research projects to understand how learning, social and cultural outcomes were being promoted for tamariki and rangatahi Māori with special educational needs in both kura auraki (English-medium schools) and kura rumaki (Māori-medium schools). 1hey also wanted to understand how this played out for other whānau members. At the time, a description of the services being promoted for Māori with special education needs acknowledged the philosophy that "tamariki and rangatahi with special needs and their whānau learn effectively through the provision of culturally competent services, which will ensure mana and tikanga are upheld" (Ministry of Education, 2003, p. 56). This chapter will briefly describe how this research was undertaken in kura rumaki and then discuss the findings that emerged. Perhaps not surprisingly, it will show that the staff from the kura who participated in this study, as with all of their students and whānau, had a very holistic and inclusive view of educating all tamariki and rangatahi, especially those with identified special education needs. The conclusion will consider some of the implications of these findings for others and propose that these research outcomes maintain relevance in 2014, a decade later.

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  • Exploring discrepancies between beliefs and practices in ESL curriculum and syllabus design

    Fester, Anthea Marcelle; Johnson, Diane (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In response to a questionnaire-based survey of teachers of English as a second language (ESL) (involving a sample of teachers from five different countries), more than one third indicated that the institution in which they worked either did not have an overall curriculum for the English courses offered or that they did not know whether it had one or not. Many respondents added comments indicating that the curriculum documents that were made available to them were inadequate, incomplete or unhelpful. In follow-up in-depth interviews with a sample of language programme managers, interviewees were asked a series of questions about their institutional curricula. All but one claimed that their institutions had curricula relating to their ESL programmes, that each of the courses offered was described in terms of levels with associated proficiency-style level descriptor statements and that there were ‘can do’ learning outcome statements associated with each course. However, a review of the curriculum documents provided by the interviewees did not always confirm their perceptions of them. This paper presents and discusses some of the findings of the research project as a whole, suggesting some possible reasons why there appears to be so much confusion and disagreement about the nature of the ESL curriculum.

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