1,701 results for Book item

  • Waste management following earthquake disaster

    Brown, C. (2014)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Towards a social ontology of improvised sound work

    Russell, B. (2010)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Improvised sound work is one of the key areas of inter-generic hybridity in contemporary music. Any attempt to identify a social role and agree on a cultural meaning for such improvisational practice must grapple first with issues of definition. These issues are especially acute for emerging hybrid practices because their practical development outstrips the ability of the available critical/ideological structures to provide useful and generally agreed definitions for them.

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  • Computer literacy: where are nurse educators on the continuum?

    Hanley, E. (2006)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Computers are becoming ubiquitous in health and education, and it is expected that nurses from undergraduate nursing programmes are computer literate when they enter the workforce. Similarly nurse educators are expected to be computer literate to model the use of information technology in their workplace. They are expected to use email for communication and a range of computer applications for presentation of course materials and reports. Additionally as more courses are delivered in flexible mode educators require more comprehensive computing skills, including confidence and competence in a range of applications. A cohort of nurse educators from one tertiary institution was surveyed to assess their perceived computer literacy and how they attained this. A questionnaire that covered seven domains of computer literacy was used to assess this. The results were illuminating and identified specific training needs for this group. Their perceived lack of skill with Groupwise email and the student database program are of concern as these are essential tools for nurse educators at this polytechnic.

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  • Waste management following earthquake disaster

    Brown, C. (2014)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Earthquakes can create large volumes of debris and solid waste. Depending on the severity of the earthquake and the nature of the built environment, waste volumes can be the equivalent of many times the annual waste generated by an affected community. Improved standards for built infrastructure are decreasing the probable impact of earthquakes in many communities. However, increased urbanisation and dependence on complex infrastructure networks increases a community’s vulnerability to a disaster. This also increases the likely amount of waste produced.

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  • Towards a social ontology of improvised sound work

    Russell, B. (2010)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Improvised sound work is one of the key areas of inter-generic hybridity in contemporary music. Any attempt to identify a social role and agree on a cultural meaning for such improvisational practice must grapple first with issues of definition. These issues are especially acute for emerging hybrid practices because their practical development outstrips the ability of the available critical/ideological structures to provide useful and generally agreed definitions for them.

    View record details
  • Computer literacy: where are nurse educators on the continuum?

    Hanley, E. (2006)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Computers are becoming ubiquitous in health and education, and it is expected that nurses from undergraduate nursing programmes are computer literate when they enter the workforce. Similarly nurse educators are expected to be computer literate to model the use of information technology in their workplace. They are expected to use email for communication and a range of computer applications for presentation of course materials and reports. Additionally as more courses are delivered in flexible mode educators require more comprehensive computing skills, including confidence and competence in a range of applications. A cohort of nurse educators from one tertiary institution was surveyed to assess their perceived computer literacy and how they attained this. A questionnaire that covered seven domains of computer literacy was used to assess this. The results were illuminating and identified specific training needs for this group. Their perceived lack of skill with Groupwise email and the student database program are of concern as these are essential tools for nurse educators at this polytechnic.

    View record details
  • Work Related Musculoskeletal Pain and It’s Management

    McBride, David; Harcombe, Helen (2012-10)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    This is an ongoing project, your comments are welcome! david.mcbride@otago.ac.nz

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  • The digitisation of New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture

    Stanger, Nigel (2010-09-15)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Over the last 25 years, it has become possible to digitise and store an ever-increasing amount and variety of material. New Zealand has been one of the leaders in this area, with early initiatives such as the New Zealand Digital Library in the mid 1990s and the more recent Digital Content Strategy (http://www.digitalcontent.govt.nz/) promoting the idea of digitising New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture and making it available online. The government is committed to ensuring “New Zealand will be a world leader in using information and technology to realise its economic, environmental, social and cultural goals” (New Zealand Government, 2005, p. 4). They see New Zealanders as world leaders in using information and technology to build globally connected science and technology research communities. A key benefit of digitising research, cultural and heritage material is improved accessibility. It can be difficult and laborious to find specific items in traditional “hard copy” collections, whereas digital collections can be quickly and easily searched. They can also be made available via the Internet to a much larger audience than was previously possible. Digitisation also removes the access bottleneck arising from there being few physical copies of an item, as many people can access the same digital item simultaneously. Finally, digitisation helps us to preserve fragile historical material by reducing the need for physical access, and hence the likelihood of further physical damage or even loss. The need to store and manage digital collections of this nature has driven the development of digital libraries and repositories of various kinds, including the already mentioned New Zealand Digital Library. More recently, the launch of the government’s Digital Strategy in 2005 resulted in a nationwide proliferation of digital research repositories at New Zealand tertiary institutions, and ultimately led to the development of the Kiwi Research Information Service (KRIS) by the National Library of New Zealand. These developments have made New Zealand’s research readily available to the wider world. The same technologies used to build these institutional research repositories are also now being applied in non-academic areas. In 2006, the Cardrona Online Museum was launched, with the aim of storing and making available heritage materials relating to the Cardrona district. The launch attracted strong interest and has led into an ongoing project to develop a similar repository for the Central Otago region. In parallel, the Horowhenua Library Trust and Katipo Communications, Ltd., developed the Kete software to facilitate online community collaboration, and recently, the National Library began to harvest and index content from New Zealand Web sites for its DigitalNZ project. In this chapter, we will examine these developments, their impact on the dissemination of New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture, and look forward to future developments in this area.

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  • Building professionals and elevating the profession? The work of university-based teacher educators in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Berg, David. A. G.; Gunn, Alexandra C.; Hill, M. F.; Haigh, M. (2017)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Pre-Publication PROOF

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  • Huw Price

    Legg, Catherine (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    A review of the life and work of Australian philosopher, Huw Price.

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  • Advertising, Public Relations and Social Marketing: shaping behaviour towards sustainable consumption

    Muratovski, G (2013-12-09)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    As the world struggles to sustain mass consumption as a lifestyle of choice, the need for sustainable behaviour becomes increasingly evident. Even though there are already a number of technical and legislative solutions underway, we still need to work on changing our consumption habits. This calls for social marketing strategies that can lead to promotion and acceptance of sustainable behaviour on a global scale. The problem, however, is that social marketing for sustainability that dominates the media today is ineffective and even counterproductive. In this study, I will examine what drives consumerism, and argue that sustainable consumption could be promoted as an alternative lifestyle, based on the same strategies that have successfully established mass consumption as a way of life. Countering the claims made for traditional social marketing, I will suggest that appealing to people’s innermost desires in the same way commercial marketing does, is in fact a more effective means of behaviour change than the negative information campaigns that are prevalent today. This calls for a different type of social marketing—one based on positive appeals related to subjective wellbeing and self-fulfilment, and not on scare tactics and dull educational campaigns.

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  • Globalised desk-top skirmishes? Reporting from the colonies

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr. (2013-10-22)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Pacific youth connecting through Poly

    Fairbairn Dunlop, P

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • From chaos towards sense: a learner-centric narrative virtual learning space

    Reiners, T; Wood, L; Dron, J (2013-12-17)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Throughout educational settings there are a range of open-focused learning activities along with those that are much more closed and structured. The plethora of opportunities creates a confusing melee of opportunities for teachers as they attempt to create activities that will engage and motivate learners. In this chapter, we demonstrate a learner-centric narrative virtual learning space, where the unrestricted exploration is combined with mechanisms to monitor the student and provide indirect guidance through elements in the learning space. The instructional designer defines the scope of the story in which the teacher and learner create narratives (a sequence of actions and milestones to complete a given task), which can be compared, assessed, and awarded with badges and scores. The model is described using an example from Logistics; where incoming orders have to be fulfilled by finding the good and delivering it to a given location in a warehouse. Preliminary studies showed that the model is able to engage the learner, create an intrinsic motivation and therewith curiosity to drive the self-paced learning.

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  • From Picardy to Picton

    Oosterman, A (2014-01-22)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    When New Zealand bound itself militarily to Great Britain at the outbreak of war with Germany in August 1914, discussion arose over how the news of the conflict was to be conveyed to readers back home. This chapter considers how news of the war on the Western Front was conveyed to New Zealanders back home and the role played by the country's first official war correspondent, Malcolm Ross.

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  • Literacy and Thinking Tools for Science Teachers

    Whitehead, David (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Literacy and thinking tools, such as Venn diagrams, are construction tools for the mind. Just as carpenters use tools to construct a piece of furniture, literate thinkers learning science can use tools to construct new scientific understandings. Like tools used by a carpenter, some literacy and thinking tools are purpose-built for science education; Josephine used a Venn diagram tool because she wanted to compare her pet bird to a bald eagle. Just as a screwdriver is built to slot into the head of a screw and rotate it, you can use literacy and thinking tools for subject- and text-specific purposes. In this chapter, we examine some characteristics of literacy and thinking tools (Whitehead, 2001, 2004). A list of these tools, together with the chapters associ-ated with their use, is provided in Table 2:1.

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  • Love of teaching: reflections of what it means to be an effective Pasifika ECE lecturer

    Utumapu-McBride, T (2013-12-03)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper is based on my reflections of an effective Pasifika Early Childhood Education (ECE) lecturer (as a result of my own personal journey and insights, e.g. my career change from that of a Learning Development Lecturer) and also through a literature review. The Auckland University of Technology's (AUT) academic promotion evaluations clearly stipulates in the criteria the characteristics of an effective lecturer as being someone who is approachable; organised and well prepared; communicates effectively; enthusiasm helps students to learn; helps students learn by using explanations and practical examples; effectively uses subject knowledge to guide students' learning; assess understanding when teaching and gives constructive feedback about students' progress; seeks and responds to feedback from students; clearly communicates assessment requirements; treats students with respect; creates a positive learning environment for students; helps students to take responsibility for their own learning; and lastly is seen as a highly effective teacher.

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  • Research in global software engineering: a systematic snapshot

    Raza, B; MacDonell, SG; Clear, Tony (2014-01-09)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper reports our extended analysis of the recent literature addressing global software engineering (GSE), using a new Systematic Snapshot Mapping (SSM) technique. The primary purpose of this work is to understand what issues are being addressed and how research is being carried out in GSE – and comparatively, what work is not being conducted. We carried out the analysis in two stages. In the first stage we analyzed 275 papers published between January 2011 and June 2012, and in the second stage we augmented our analysis by considering a further 26 papers (from the 2013 International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE’13). Our results reveal that, currently, GSE studies are focused on management- and infrastructure-related factors, using principally evaluative research approaches. Most of the studies are conducted at the organizational level, mainly using methods such as interviews, surveys, field studies and case studies. The USA, India and China are major players in GSE, with USA-India collaborations being the most frequently studied, followed by USA-China. While a considerable number of GSE-related studies have been published since January 2011 they are currently quite narrowly focused, on exploratory research and explanatory theories, and the critical research paradigm has been untouched. An absence of formulative research, experimentation and simulation, and a related focus on evaluative approaches, all suggest that existing tools, methods and approaches from related fields are being tested in the GSE context, even though these may not be inherently applicable to the additional scale and complexity of GSE.

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  • Off the grid. Left out and over.

    Douglas, C (2014-02-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Street health: Practitioner service provision for Maori homeless people in Auckland

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Hodgetts, Darrin; Groot, Shiloh Ann Maree; Stolte, Ottilie Emma Elisabeth; Chamberlain, Kerry (2012-09)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Drawing insights from interviews with Maori homeless people, health professionals, and relevant local and international literatures, this chapter focuses on the provision of medical care to homeless people. In particular, we propose that health services orientate to accommodate the worldviews and circumstances of Maori homeless people. Below we consider colonialism and societal developments that have led to homelessness among Maori today. We then present a case study of ‘Grant’, which was compiled from common aspects of various Maori homeless people who access health services at the Auckland City Mission (ACM); an organisation with a long history of catering to the needs and hopes of dispossessed groups, providing food, clothing, advocacy, social and health services. The relational orientation of healthcare at the ACM is discussed, and leads to an exploration of ‘judgement-free service space’ for meeting client needs (cf., Trussell & Mair, 2010). Lastly, we focus on how health professionals can respond to the multiple healthcare needs of Maori homeless people, in partnership with social services.

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